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NEWS
January 28, 2015
PEDESTRIANS, the Philadelphia Police Department has your back. Actually, it's on your back. Motorists and bicyclists, you can ease back. Last year's numbers put a torch to assurances from the city that enforcement is necessary for bikes and cars and pedestrians to coexist. Even the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia applauds enforcement. How did that pie in the sky taste? Let's start with tickets written to motorists for moving violations in Philadelphia last year.
NEWS
November 28, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Driver beware. Cruising through a crosswalk filled with pedestrians in New Jersey could cost you $43. That's the fine in a state statute rarely enforced in this busy shopping district until now, according to local police. As a reminder, the police department is putting up removable 36-inch signs each weekend at three busy intersections on North and South Main Streets, telling drivers to brake for pedestrians, a tactic already used in such towns as Haddonfield, Woodbury, Swedesboro and Hammonton.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | by Martha Rowen
As the nation was still reeling from the schoolyard shooting in San Diego, it must have been disturbing for Philadelphians to learn that they can be threatened by guns even in their cars, that most sacrosanct of realms. News reports told of the sentencing of a gun-toting patent attorney, Jeffrey Spangler. Last June, when a car drove dangerously close to him as he attempted to cross the street, Spangler, who describes himself as an "aggressive pedestrian," pulled a gun from his briefcase.
NEWS
December 12, 2002
WHENEVER it snows, the city plows Roosevelt Boulevard and Broad Street to make them safer for drivers. But what about the pedestrians? When the city plows these streets, they block the corners where people have to cross. Crossing the Boulevard at Rising Sun Avenue was horrendous! The snow was plowed up on the walkway! We had to walk in the street alongside of incoming traffic and hope we did not get hit. It is bad enough to have to cross any section of the Boulevard or Broad Street without snow.
NEWS
July 19, 2008
It was a hair-raising adventure for many of the folks on foot who carefully made their way to the center lanes of Benjamin Franklin Parkway for Thursday's public announcement of a welcome $17.1 million plan to upgrade the boulevard. Cars whizzed along the outer lanes as usual, making some pedestrians' journey a potential life-and-death moment. Gov. Rendell and Mayor Nutter needed no better illustration of why the Parkway needs to be more pedestrian-friendly. Their announcement was welcome to those who have waged a years-long effort to wrest back the Parkway from car and truck traffic.
NEWS
February 6, 2005 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lindenwold has found a way to bridge the gap between the old and historic. Borough officials said that when a new United States Avenue bridge is built, the old bridge, which dates to 1904, will not be demolished. Instead, it will be restored and preserved as a span for pedestrians and bicycle traffic. Mayor Frank DeLucca said the old bridge was closed in 2000 because of deterioration and was deemed unsafe for cars, trucks and emergency vehicles. The two-lane wooden plank bridge is 140 feet long and 16.4 feet wide, and is steel-enforced.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Have you seen the new Walnut Street Bridge? If you haven't, don't bother. It's as if they took a highway overpass, slapped it across the Schuylkill, and walked away without a second thought. Great for cars, maybe, but not exactly something you'd want to look at or walk across. The new bridge, which opened in the fall, is more than just an eyesore. It's another lost opportunity. As the bridges linking Center City and West Philadelphia have been replaced this century, they've become increasingly ugly and anti-pedestrian.
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As anyone venturing through Center City on foot during this sweltering summer must surely have noticed, Philadelphia is one of the few American cities that compete with nature to blow hot air in your face. The steamy vapor that wafts up from more than 500 sidewalk vents and heats your already overheated body is the unintended byproduct of a century-old steam utility that still provides heat and hot water to offices, hospitals, hotels and other large commercial users in Center City.
NEWS
March 19, 2011
A commercial vehicle struck and killed two pedestrians just before 5:30 a.m. Saturday along Route 100 in Chester County, police said. Uwchlan Township Police did not immediately release the names of the pedestrians, who they said were hit by a southbound vehicle between Rutgers and Worthington drives. The victims were pronounced dead at the scene. Anyone with information on the accident was asked to call Uwchlan police at 610-692-5100. - Claudia Vargas
NEWS
July 28, 2011
By Brian Hickey There are 19 reasons to set aside the hysteria over last week's erroneous reports that Philadelphia plans to punish people for texting while walking. Police should be on the lookout for - and even issue fines to - egregiously distracted pedestrians. The city's continuing "Give Respect - Get Respect" campaign to reduce distraction, which generated the exaggerated stories, is not unprecedented. A yearlong 1997 initiative called "Operation Crosswalk" also increased traffic enforcement and education.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE HIT-AND-RUN tour bus that killed a pedestrian Tuesday in Center City struck the man at the front of the bus, dragged him 50 feet underneath and then "lurched" when the rear wheels rolled over him. But driver Walter Jefferson, 66, told police he didn't know he'd hit anyone and continued on his journey to Washington, D.C., unaware that pedestrian Joseph Heard, 46, lay dying in the bus' wake, said Capt. John Wilczynski, commander of the Accident Investigation Division. The 9:45 a.m. accident happened just outside Philly police headquarters, at Race and Franklin streets, so investigators used surveillance video from the Roundhouse to identify the striking vehicle, Wilczynski said.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan and Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writers
A 47-year-old pedestrian was fatally struck Tuesday morning outside Philadelphia police headquarters by a bus that left the scene, police said. There were unconfirmed reports that the man was dragged several dozen feet by the bus, and that it was a white tour bus with tinted windows. Paramedics rushed to the victim and took him to Hahnemann University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after 10 a.m. His shoes and headphones and a pool of blood could be seen in the street.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police will face a massive task in screening the 100,000 pedestrians a day expected to cross the Ben Franklin Bridge from New Jersey to see the pope in Philadelphia next month. If 100,000 people are screened, that would be four times as many people as are screened at Philadelphia International Airport on an average day. Law enforcement officials briefed on bridge security plans said all papal visitors would be individually screened before they crossed the bridge. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about the plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Jim Kenney's famous temper was on full view the day we strolled around Center City, looking at construction sites. More specifically, we were looking at construction sites where the sidewalks had been blocked. There aren't many things that make the Democratic mayoral candidate madder than having to cross the street because of a sidewalk closure - except when contractors treat the cordoned-off space as free parking. "Tell me why that's necessary," Kenney sputtered as we reached the corner of 15th and Chestnut, where the 51-story W Hotel is going up. His face reddened, his eyes flashed.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
NEARLY TWO MONTHS after a Ride the Ducks boat struck and crushed his wife at a Center City intersection, a Texas man is suing the company and the city of Philadelphia. Daniel Karnicki, of Beaumont, Texas, filed the lawsuit yesterday, claiming that Liz Karnicki's wrongful death was at the hands of Ride the Ducks. The lawsuit was filed on the fifth anniversary of another Ride the Ducks collision that killed two Hungarian tourists who were on board. Karnicki's attorney, Robert Mongeluzzi, said that the duck boat's blind spots made it nearly impossible for the driver to see Liz Karnicki when she crossed the street, and that the driver was distracted because he also acted as a tour guide.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northeast Philadelphia man accused of racing another driver, who allegedly struck and killed a mother and three of her sons on Roosevelt Boulevard, pleaded guilty Monday to four counts of vehicular homicide. Ahmen Holloman, 32, was sentenced to five to 10 years in prison in a deal negotiated one day before his trial was to begin. Holloman, prosecutors said, did not hit Samara Banks or her sons on July 16, 2013, as they crossed the Boulevard near Second Street in Olney. Rather, prosecutors said, he was racing the driver who did strike them.
NEWS
June 3, 2015
ISSUE | CAMPAIGNS Votes, not dollars Like many of those who advocate that money equals speech, George Will sees it as a violation of free speech to limit a person's right to introduce as much advocacy money as they want into a political campaign ("Enough reform mischief," May 29). But campaign-reform advocates are not trying to limit free speech; they are merely trying to maintain a separate element of democracy: one person, one vote. Just because someone has the loudest horn in the room does not mean he has a right to drown out all others.
NEWS
January 28, 2015
PEDESTRIANS, the Philadelphia Police Department has your back. Actually, it's on your back. Motorists and bicyclists, you can ease back. Last year's numbers put a torch to assurances from the city that enforcement is necessary for bikes and cars and pedestrians to coexist. Even the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia applauds enforcement. How did that pie in the sky taste? Let's start with tickets written to motorists for moving violations in Philadelphia last year.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An 18-year-old Temple University student who may have been taking pictures from an eighth-floor Center City dorm room Thursday evening fell to her death and struck and injured a pedestrian on the sidewalk below, police said. Shortly before 6 p.m., police responded to numerous 911 calls reporting that one or two people may have fallen from a building in the 100 block of South 16th Street, said Chief Inspector Scott Small. They found two women lying next to each other on the sidewalk outside the H&M store at the high-traffic corner of 16th and Chestnut Streets, Small said.
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