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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman Kendall, 87, a retired pediatrics professor whose association with Temple University, its medical school and its hospital spanned half a century, died Tuesday of throat cancer at his home in Center City. Before moving to Center City about 10 years ago, Dr. Kendall was a longtime resident of Wyncote. Dr. Kendall began teaching pediatrics at Temple University School of Medicine in 1949, rising to full professor in 1966. He was Temple University Hospital's director of newborn services from 1946 to 1972, and headed its Division of Neonatology from 1972 to 1979, when he accepted emeritus status.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
BINKIES, BLANKETS, bottles, Boppies, burp cloths . . . Now add books to the list of indispensable items for baby. Aiming to improve early-childhood literacy, the Free Library of Philadelphia is partnering with the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in a program that will get library cards into the hands of infants at their earliest checkups with the doctor. The program, "Read, Baby, Read," will be piloted at four of the hospital's Care Network and Pediatric & Adolescent Care practices.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lillian Beatrice Panzer Kravis, 93, of King of Prussia, a longtime physician and professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died Monday, Feb. 10, at her home. Dr. Kravis was born in Philadelphia on Dec. 8, 1920, the daughter of Julius and Tillie Markowitz Panzer. A graduate of Philadelphia High School for Girls, Dr. Kravis was the first in her family to go to college, earning a scholarship to attend the University of Pennsylvania. After completing her undergraduate studies, Dr. Kravis attended Penn's medical school, graduating in 1943.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Madeline S. Daily, 49, of Philadelphia, former director of ambulatory pediatrics at Hahnemann Hospital and mother of two young boys, died Wednesday at Albert Einstein Hospital due to complications from Crohn's disease. Relatives say Dr. Daily's life was marked by her feisty battle to overcome two serious physical illnesses, and a later decision to put her medical career on hold in order to devote full-time attention to her sons. Though she excelled in school, Dr. Daily never considered college after graduating from Frankford High School in 1967.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Victor C. Vaughan 3d, 81, former chairman of Temple University Medical School's department of pediatrics and medical director of St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, died Thursday at Stanford University Hospital in California of complications following a heart attack. A clinical professor of pediatrics at Stanford University, he had lived in Carmel Valley, Calif. In 1952, Dr. Vaughan joined the Temple faculty as an associate professor of pediatrics and the St. Christopher's staff as director of the hospital's hematology laboratory.
NEWS
January 15, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles H. Classen, 90, of Bryn Mawr, a retired physician and former director of pediatrics at Bryn Mawr Hospital, died of heart failure Friday at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Dr. Classen was a physician for more than 60 years, remaining in private practice until he was 83. He served as chief of pediatrics at Bryn Mawr Hospital for 10 years and taught students and physicians at area medical schools and hospitals, including the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 4, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
J. Ronald Halenda, 78, of Chadds Ford, former chairman of the division of pediatrics at Riddle Memorial Hospital, died of complications from a stroke on Friday, April 29, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Born in Dickson City near Scranton, he graduated from Dickson City High School in 1949, was an Eagle Scout, and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Scranton in 1953. Dr. Halenda graduated in 1957 from the Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Halenda began his private practice at the Media Clinic in 1962 and, after Riddle Memorial opened, he became chairman of its division of pediatrics in 1964.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rushing down the hall in his white frock, Dr. Peter Trinkaus, director of inpatient services in the pediatrics department of Albert Einstein Medical Center, Northern Division, didn't notice the three women wearing Mickey Mouse shirts in the corridor of his own department. He didn't see their makeshift desk or scrawled sign - Visitors please sign in - until these pediatric safety police officers stopped the doctor, late for an lecture to medical students, in his tracks. "Who are you?"
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Francis Jacobs, 81, of West Chester, a prominent pediatrician, died of cardiac arrest Monday at Chester County Hospital. A lifelong resident of West Chester, Dr. Jacobs began his practice there in 1947 in a two-room office at his home on Walnut Street. In 1952, he was joined by Dr. Harold H. Alderfer, and they had offices in a Victorian home on East Biddle Street. Both physicians retired in 1991. Early in his practice, young patients were few, Dr. Jacobs said in a 1991 interview.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Think of all the things your hands touched so far today: the railings, doorknobs, elevator buttons. How dirty did your hands get? And how clean should they be? Given the plethora of nasties that abound on these surfaces, many people turn to antibacterial soaps. But one ingredient, triclosan, has come under increasing scrutiny because of the potential for interfering with hormone systems. Triclosan also is in wipes, creams, toothpastes, and more. One survey found that 76 percent of liquid soaps and 29 percent of bar soaps contained triclosan or its close relative, triclocarban.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Besides spending his career as a pediatric neurologist, James E. Wark often gave evenings to the Russian writers Anton Chekhov and Alexander Pushkin. Though their works are well known in English, his interest was in translating some of them from the Russian himself, said his wife, Soryl Angel. Though he had visited Siberia on a brief medical assignment years ago, she said, Dr. Wark tutored himself in Russian vocabulary and grammar through evening classes at Main Line School Night.
NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
"Many things we need can wait. The child cannot. Now is the time his bones are being formed, his blood is being made, his mind is being developed. To him we cannot say tomorrow, his name is today. " - Gabriela Mistral, Chilean Poet, Nobel Laureate The main aim of pediatrics is prevention. Prevention of diseases, of injury, of emotional problems, of developmental and intellectual delays. Our armamentarium include vaccines; screening instruments; and guidance on development, safety, and nutrition.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Tom Avril and Dylan Purcell, STAFF WRITERS
St. Christopher's Hospital for Children said Monday that it had stopped conducting elective heart surgeries pending an internal review. The North Philadelphia facility continues to perform emergency heart surgery, hospital spokeswoman Kate Donaghy said. The hospital did not indicate what prompted the review. "The hospital's heart surgery and trauma teams remain ready to respond to the needs of emergency patients, including emergency cardiac surgery," Donaghy said in an email.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sitting on his bed at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the first child in the world to receive a double hand transplant talked about his big plans. Zion Harvey, 8, of Baltimore, wants to climb the monkey bars. Throw a football. Play the guitar. Maybe even become a doctor. "But I'll be the kind that doesn't give shots," he said with an impish grin Monday. On Tuesday afternoon, a team from Children's and the University of Pennsylvania announced its early-July surgical tour de force, then introduced Zion; his mom, Pattie Ray; stepdad Kevon Gant; and little sister Zoe. "The planning took approximately 18 months," said transplant team leader L. Scott Levin, who established Penn's hand-transplant program and expanded it to Children's.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Victor H. Auerbach, 86, of Ambler, a biochemistry professor and researcher in the field of pediatric disorders at Temple University School of Medicine, died Saturday, May 23, of an infection at Abington Memorial Hospital. A longtime resident of Ambler, he had lived at the Artman Lutheran Home for the last three years. Born in New York City, he attended the Bronx School of Science as an honors student and received a bachelor of arts degree from Columbia University. He pursued his love of science at Harvard University, where he earned a master's degree in medical sciences in 1955 and a doctorate in biochemistry two years later.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WORKING WITH the cantankerous C. Everett Koop had to have been a challenge. But Jack Templeton was up to it. The two doctors shared a simple philosophy: No case, however desperate, however seemingly impossible, was hopeless. While the two were pediatric surgeons at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, they participated in the separation of numerous conjoined twins, some of which other surgeons considered hopeless cases. Not as long as Koop and Templeton were on duty. No child was just going to be left to die. Jack Templeton, who died Saturday at age 75, trained in pediatric surgery under Koop, the hospital's surgeon-in-chief, from 1973 to 1975.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2015
The public relations and crisis communications firm Bellevue Communications Group , Philadelphia and Harrisburg, has promoted Diana Torralvo to senior account executive from account executive. In her new role, Torralvo will be responsible for handling media, public relations, and social-media strategies for clients. NRG Energy , Philadelphia, has hired Keri Murschell as director of business and product innovation, East retail. She founded Keri Golf, a company focused on women's products, and later sold it to a large manufacturer.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Robert William Lloyd, 70, of Jenkintown, a pediatric dentist caring for children, teens, and special-needs patients for more than 40 years in his private practice in Jenkintown, died suddenly Friday, April 18, of a heart attack. "Bob," as he was known by most, also cared for the residents at the Home of the Merciful Savior in Philadelphia and the Lynch Home in Gwynedd Valley, and was on the dental staff at Abington Memorial Hospital and at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for 39 years.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | BY ASHLEY KUHN, Daily News Staff Writer kuhna@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
FOR GREG and Gracie Pfeiffer, having a son born with a genetic disorder affecting his skull called for the expertise of craniofacial specialists at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Doctors diagnosed their son, Danny, with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, a rare condition. Nearly 14 years later, Danny has had five reconstructive surgeries. "My doctors make me feel like an unstoppable person even through the hard times of surgeries," Danny said. "My doctors are my superheroes. " Danny's story was showcased yesterday to illustrate the importance of continuing the funding of medical resident programs at CHOP and other U.S. pediatric hospitals.
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