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Peer Pressure

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NEWS
September 6, 1989 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
In the middle of his nationally-televised address last night on his $7.9 billion anti-drug plan, President Bush made a simple statement: "Peer pressure spreads drug use. Peer pressure can help stop it. " Kevin Sawyer, 18, who knows all about peer pressure and drugs, must have felt the president was speaking to him straight from the Oval Office. "The president said peer pressure causes drug use, and it does," said Sawyer, one of a group of Philadelphians whose lives have been touched by drugs and who agreed to share their impressions of the speech.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | By Tom Sheridan, Special to The Inquirer
Calvin Murphy is uniquely qualified to talk to teenagers about handling pressure. Murphy played in the National Basketball Association for 13 years with the San Diego and Houston Rockets. The 5-foot-9 guard finished his career with the second-highest career free-throw percentage in NBA history and was the fifth- leading scorer in the league in 1977-78. When he spoke to students at Council Rock Tuesday to offer advice about dealing with peer pressure and avoiding drug abuse, Murphy recounted his experiences with another sport - baton twirling.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | By Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald "Dinky" Palmer, 16, was being subjected to peer pressure. "How do you feel about drugs?" asked Warren Sanders, also 16, staring hard into Palmer's eyes. "I'm against them," stammered Palmer, taken aback by the blunt question. "Why?" continued Sanders. "Too many people get killed," said Palmer, sitting up straighter and rising to the challenge. "You got any stronger feelings?" asked Sanders. "How do you feel about parents on drugs?" "I feel it's a shame.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | BY LINDA WRIGHT AVERY
"I was shocked . . . because he wasn't a bad mouth," says Michael Richardson Jr. He is referring to Brian Penn, the Mount Airy boy fatally shot on the corner of Vernon Road and Fayette Street last week. Michael and Brian, both 15, went to the same school. They were friends. They lived on the same street, the 7900 block of Fayette Street. It is a long, densely populated block, with lots of children, including teenage boys who hang out on the corner of Fayette St. and Vernon Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2011
DEAR ABBY: My best friend, "Brianna," often invites me to big parties at her older friends' homes. At first I was thrilled because I'm only 15. At the parties I saw some people doing bad things - but I didn't, at first. Soon, Brianna pressured me into doing some things that I didn't feel comfortable doing. My parents are very strict about these things, and I knew it was wrong. I have tried to get out of going to the parties, but Brianna says bad things to me. I have even had to lie to my parents about where I'm going.
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | By Bill Doherty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cardinal O'Hara junior Tim Sorochen admits it. He fell victim to it. Good old-fashioned peer pressure - as much a part of the teenage years as acne and low-paying summer jobs. Sorochen, you see, spent his previous springs playing baseball and running track. Fine pursuits, both. But if one grows up in Springfield, there is only one spring sport, lacrosse. The sport was already popular, but its popularity went through the roof after Springfield won the 1992 state championship.
NEWS
May 29, 1997 | By Natalie Kostelni, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was a chance for Perkiomen Valley high school and middle school students to smoke out the facts about tobacco before an audience of susceptible fourth and fifth graders. To snuff out smoking and its lure to youngsters, about 40 high school and middle school students joined a group called Teens Against Tobacco Use, or TATU. The group goes into elementary schools to preach the evils of tobacco to younger children before they reach their experimental teenage years, when peer pressure to sneak cigarettes heightens.
NEWS
January 10, 2002 | By Barbara Boyer, Martha Woodall and Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A small army of specialists converged on Roberto Clemente Middle School yesterday, a day after 28 students - 12 of whom received hospital treatment - had taken powerful doses of Xanax that had been pillaged from a relative's home by a 13-year-old girl. Veteran police, school officials and experts agree they had never seen a mass consumption like the one at the North Philadelphia school. The prescription antianxiety drug had been passed among friends, ages 12 to 15, at lunch and swallowed mostly because of peer pressure, authorities said.
NEWS
September 29, 2009 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
BY MOST ACCOUNTS, Marquis Moses was a deeply troubled teen. He used marijuana. He skipped school so many times and got so many flunking grades that he had to repeat the 11th grade. By age 17, he'd already been arrested twice as a juvenile - once for assault and once for drug possession. And he lived on a seedy North Philadelphia block with a single mother who, he has said, frequently beat him and called him names. No one foresaw that he would become a killer. But, maybe, someone should have.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 20 teenagers yesterday gave community leaders their frank views on youth violence at a hearing in a recreation center in Northwest Philadelphia. The teenagers, who belong to the City Wide Improvement & Planning Agency, a group that works with Philadelphia youth, read prepared questions and then answered them for the adults, who had come to listen. Do you think crime in the schools has made it hard to learn? "You come for an education, then you turn around and there's a fight and everybody goes out to the hall to see it and you don't get anything done," said Gary Peterson, 19, a first-year student at the Community College of Philadelphia who served as moderator.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Ever notice how nearly everything we read about African American males isn't about how they're portrayed as people but what they represent as data? Almost always cited as the highest dropout, unemployment, homicide, incarceration, baby-daddy, insert-negative-stereotype-here statistic. Hardly ever depicted as someone who feels or loves, who is respected as a son, pupil, spouse, or simply a kid with a dream. Well, this week, newly minted authors Amir Isley, Cameron Pollard, Hasan Saunders-Prioleau, Tyhee Robinson, Vaughn Hines, Christian Hankerson, Isaiah Lee and Kyheim Little - middle schoolers at Gesu School in North Philly - blew those bleak images out of the water with the words of their new book, Listen to Our Voices , produced with longtime educator Christine S. Beck, the recently retired CEO and president at Gesu.
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | BY GERALD K. McOSCAR
ASK THE average person to describe the typical young drug addict or alcoholic, and odds are he will describe a poor, inner-city high-school dropout from a single-parent household, usually a racial minority. Not so fast. A new study identifies a link between high IQ in childhood and illegal drug use at ages 16 and 30. Writing in the British Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health , researchers James White and G. David Batty used data from a study that tracked over 30 years 8,000 Britons born in 1970.
NEWS
January 18, 2012
PATCO rail commuters will soon have their own "quiet car. " Following the lead of Amtrak, SEPTA and other transit agencies that have prohibited cellphone use or loud conversation in one train car, PATCO will designate the last car in each of its train as a quiet car on weekdays, starting March 1. The quiet-car experiment will last three months, and if it is well received, the designation will be made permanent, PATCO general manager John...
NEWS
November 4, 2011
THE SUPREME Court of Pennsylvania costs us $1 million for each of our Supreme Court justices, including staffers with $650 monthly car allowances, as reported by the Pennsylvania Independent . The Supreme Court of the United States functions from one location for all 50 states. Why does the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania require three separate and expensive locations? Can you imagine what we are going to pay for pensions, in light of the fact that very few are ever not "retained"?
NEWS
August 22, 2011
CERTAINLY the violent flash-mob issue merits both serious investigation and stern punishment. But as I was listening to the news on the radio about the mayor touting a successful flash-mob-free weekend, filled with additional activities for youth, and promises of even more from private industry, I have to ask why this wasn't done before the incident rather than after. What message does this send? Len Trower Philadelphia I want to first say to all the good decent responsible teens who are black: This letter wants to separate you from the rest.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2011
DEAR ABBY: My best friend, "Brianna," often invites me to big parties at her older friends' homes. At first I was thrilled because I'm only 15. At the parties I saw some people doing bad things - but I didn't, at first. Soon, Brianna pressured me into doing some things that I didn't feel comfortable doing. My parents are very strict about these things, and I knew it was wrong. I have tried to get out of going to the parties, but Brianna says bad things to me. I have even had to lie to my parents about where I'm going.
SPORTS
June 1, 2011 | By LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
LeSean McCoy didn't mince words yesterday, when asked if his conditioning is where it normally would be, as May turns to June. "Nah," McCoy said after joining the Eagles' impromptu player-organized workouts in Burlington County, McCoy's first appearance. "I'm a couple pounds heavier than I want to be. It's one of those things where you work out every day, but it's not the same. [Normally you would have] teammates pushing you, guys you got to war with out on the field, day in and day out, for practices and camp, and games.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2011
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 21-year-old male who feels lost and unfulfilled, and it's because I don't know what I want or deserve. I am one of three adopted children. I was the child who always needed the family support system the most. I come from a not-so-happy family, one with all its priorities centered around money. (Or, more accurately, lack of money.) I never felt the love a child should feel from his family. My problem these days is my alcohol intake. I can't stay away from beer. I drink to forget my family problems and the fact that I can't seem to get anything right.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010
ACTRESS Tasha Smith has made a name for herself by playing loudmouth, neck-rolling black women with too much attitude. Best known for playing the role of the argumentative - but perfectly coifed - diva in Tyler Perry 's "Why Did I Get Married?" and the skanky-but-ghetto-fabulous mother in "Daddy's Little Girls," the Camden native has overcome great odds to achieve her Hollywood dreams. This weekend she's coming back to South Jersey to show her fiance her old stomping grounds and also to share her story in hopes of inspiring other women.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2010
"Excuses are the tools with which persons with no purpose in view build for themselves great monuments of nothing. " - Actor Steven Grayhm NEARLY EVERY day of his adult life, most people who meet him ask Larry Charleston IV if he's a basketball player. Sure the 6-foot-6-inch, athletic, classically black and beautiful 32-year-old could have taken that path. However, Larry, a very eligible bachelor, answers that most frequently asked question with a confident and knowing smile and a simple, "No, actually I am a doctor, a neurologist.
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