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Peer Review

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NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's Class 500 grants program once again is living up to its tradition of controversy, with Mayor Goode and City Council grappling over control of the giveaway. Among those caught in the middle: at least 17 Northeast groups. Those community organizations were among nearly 150 groups in the Northeast that were expecting to receive money this year, according to a list of recommendations submitted to the mayor by Council. But the administration, which has the final say on awards, has decided against awarding the 17. The biggest loser is Glen Foerd on the Delaware, the community mansion and estate in East Torresdale.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
In a decision that some medical experts say could inhibit the willingness of doctors to criticize their colleagues' mistakes, the state Supreme Court has ruled that physician "peer reviews" at hospitals cannot always be kept confidential. In a nine-page opinion issued last Friday, the court unanimously concluded that a surgeon at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby is entitled to an audiotape of a meeting at which other physicians reviewed his conduct in a surgery that allegedly went awry.
NEWS
October 20, 2006 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, if Stanford professor Peter P. Lee's paper on leukemia was not accepted by a journal, it would be banished to academic oblivion. But, faced with a handful of fraud cases, publications are beginning to put the evaluation process online, in a sort of academic Wikipedia that upends traditional secret peer review. That's why Lee's paper was available for critiques, good and bad, on Nature's Web site. From June to September, the journal allowed authors to put their work online, and required reviewers to post their names and affiliations.
NEWS
November 4, 2005 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a first-year medical student, Haig Setrakian spends a lot of time with his lab partners - up to 12 hours a week, not counting evenings out. Now, his professors want to know what he's learned about his fellow would-be doctors, and whether he thinks they should be doctors at all. After a few months in his gross anatomy class at the Drexel University College of Medicine, his professors handed out a peer-evaluation form, asking him to evaluate his...
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | By Dan Lovely, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff writer Joseph Grace contributed to this report
City Council yesterday began probing the Class 500 money mess, and quickly found a solution: Take back control of the money. "No organization has greater wisdom than the collective judgment of City Council," Councilman David Cohen said as a special Council committee discussed reforms in the city's distribution of more than $10 million to community and cultural groups. Committee chairman John F. Street, after announcing Council had no preconceived ideas on how to award Class 500 grants, said this year's process - initially controlled by Mayor Goode - "should never be repeated.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
The Bush administration is determined to give new meaning to the term political science. While jabbering about "sound science," President Bush has packed advisory panels with ideological appointments, censored reports, and gagged government scientists. Now, an obscure administrative power grab, camouflaged as a scientific gold standard, will likely result in giving politics even more control over science. The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is tarnishing "peer review," a respected process routinely used by academic journals and government agencies.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Wednesday released detailed plans for its comprehensive radiation study of oil and gas development and said it intends to begin sampling this month. The agency plans to analyze radioactivity levels of flowback waters, treatment solids, drill cuttings, and drilling equipment, along with the transportation, storage and disposal of drilling wastes. DEP says current data do not indicate any health risks, but activists have raised concerns about naturally occuring radioactivity in materials extracted from the mile-deep wells.
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
In an attempt to end a long-running debate over the size of the borough's Police Department, the Hatboro Council has voted to conduct a study of the department. The Borough Council voted, 6-1, Monday to have a police chief outside the department review the manpower and the deployment of the 12-member department. In December, the council approved a budget calling for one less police officer than the previous budget provided for - a move that rankled the mayor and police chief.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
A Delaware County police chief has been selected to study financially strapped Hatboro's Police Department in an attempt to resolve a political dispute over manpower levels. Brookhaven Police Chief John Eller was selected by the state Department of Community Affairs (DCA) and approved by the Hatboro Borough Council to perform the study of efficiency and staffing, council President Thomas McMackin said after the council's Monday night meeting. In December, the council approved a budget with money for a 12-member Police Department, one less officer than in the 1987 budget.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council President Joseph E. Coleman has sent congratulatory letters to hundreds of private groups favored by Council for city Class 500 grants, pre- empting a selection process established by the Goode administration in the wake of a public controversy. Administration officials have said they planned to announce the awards of $10 million in cultural and community grants in mid-August, after weighing the recommendations of Council against those of "peer review panels" made up of experts outside government.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Wednesday released detailed plans for its comprehensive radiation study of oil and gas development and said it intends to begin sampling this month. The agency plans to analyze radioactivity levels of flowback waters, treatment solids, drill cuttings, and drilling equipment, along with the transportation, storage and disposal of drilling wastes. DEP says current data do not indicate any health risks, but activists have raised concerns about naturally occuring radioactivity in materials extracted from the mile-deep wells.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania environmental regulators announced Thursday that they will study the naturally occurring radioactivity associated with oil and natural gas development, which activists have raised as a threat from Marcellus Shale drilling. The Department of Environmental Protection said the peer-reviewed study would examine radioactivity levels in liquid and solid wastes from drilling, and how the materials are transported, stored, and disposed. Some environmentalists have raised fears that the natural radioactive material contained in deep bedrock might contaminate drilling wastes, streams, and even the natural gas itself.
NEWS
October 20, 2006 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, if Stanford professor Peter P. Lee's paper on leukemia was not accepted by a journal, it would be banished to academic oblivion. But, faced with a handful of fraud cases, publications are beginning to put the evaluation process online, in a sort of academic Wikipedia that upends traditional secret peer review. That's why Lee's paper was available for critiques, good and bad, on Nature's Web site. From June to September, the journal allowed authors to put their work online, and required reviewers to post their names and affiliations.
NEWS
November 4, 2005 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a first-year medical student, Haig Setrakian spends a lot of time with his lab partners - up to 12 hours a week, not counting evenings out. Now, his professors want to know what he's learned about his fellow would-be doctors, and whether he thinks they should be doctors at all. After a few months in his gross anatomy class at the Drexel University College of Medicine, his professors handed out a peer-evaluation form, asking him to evaluate his...
NEWS
July 23, 2005
Most members of Congress who want to unravel a scientific controversy call a hearing. There, witnesses with opposing views make their best case. Or they call the National Academies of Science or another independent panel for expert advice. Not Texas Republican Joe Barton, chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. He has opted for a witch hunt. Last month, Barton launched an investigation into the research and backgrounds of three prominent climate scientists.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
The Bush administration is determined to give new meaning to the term political science. While jabbering about "sound science," President Bush has packed advisory panels with ideological appointments, censored reports, and gagged government scientists. Now, an obscure administrative power grab, camouflaged as a scientific gold standard, will likely result in giving politics even more control over science. The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is tarnishing "peer review," a respected process routinely used by academic journals and government agencies.
NEWS
November 17, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
There are an estimated 15,000 senior centers across the nation, serving close to 10 million older adults annually. Many are supported by federal and state funds funneled through local government agencies and, in some cases, money from private groups such as United Way chapters. Some senior centers run a better operation than others, but there is little oversight, except from county governments that give them money, and no formal agreement on what these centers should do. That may be changing, though, if the National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC)
NEWS
August 27, 2001
Surprise is the great intoxicant in the scientist's life. To discover something you never dreamed of, or to discover that the universe doesn't behave in the way everyone thought ... for the questing mind, it doesn't get better than that. Well, questing minds, you've had a great month. Turns out one of the fundamental concepts in physics, a little thing called the "fine structure constant" - or just alpha - may have changed over time. All over the world, erasers are being ground down to the nub as scientists revise the way they once saw the universe.
NEWS
July 3, 2001 | by Charles Krauthammer
As the Bush administration approaches a decision on stem-cell research, the caricatures have already been drawn. On one side are the human benefactors who wish only a chance to use the remarkable potential of stem cells - primitive cells that have the potential to develop into any body tissue with the proper tweaking - to cure a myriad of diseases. On the other side stand the Catholic Church and the usual anti-abortion zealots who, because of squeamishness about the fate of a few clumps of cells, will prevent this great boon to humanity.
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