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Peking Duck

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NEWS
October 4, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
If your dream is to adopt a bundle of joy, the Philadelphia Zoo has bundles ranging from a few pounds to more than five tons. For 20 years, the zoo has invited people to adopt any of its 1,700 residents for donations of as little as $25. To help celebrate that anniversary, on every Monday this month the zoo will be offering Daily News readers the chance to win an adoption of a zoo resident. Today's Adopt-a-Critter contest adoptee is a white Peking duck, originally from China.
FOOD
March 21, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
If ever there was a beloved dive, it was the old Sang Kee in Chinatown. Its crispy Peking duck and wonton soup were always more than enough to lure a devoted league of adventurous diners. They saw beyond - yes, even relished - the plain white walls of its dingy 40-seat dining room, as unadorned and anonymous as any other Chinatown storefront. Even owner-chefMichael Chow (Sang Kee means "Michael's Restaurant" in Chinese) recalls with a certain measure of satisfaction how "people used to say it was a hole in the wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Yin Kee Peking Duck Restaurant has opened quietly in Chinatown, but it shouldn't be long before hungry hordes begin clamoring to get in. The food is well prepared, the menu diverse, the prices wonderful and the service excellent. The restaurant is typical duck house in appearance: ducks, chickens and such dangling in the window, people lining up in the vestibule waiting for takeout and a dining area designed strictly for function. At lunch, which generally runs until 3 p.m., Yin Kee offers special combinations that cost from $3.25 to $4.50.
FOOD
August 10, 1997 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Joe Poon is up to some new tricks. The wisecracking, veggie-sculpting chef (original owner of Joe Poon's Peking Duck House) has an upscale new restaurant that plays mind games with those who think of our Chinatown's Chinese food as locked into tradition. At the new Joseph Poon, spinach nachos arrive with the wonton soup. Grilled Chinese-spiced cuttlefish gets an Italian dressing of balsamic vinegar and extra-virgin olive oil. A classic version of Peking duck - the dish that made Poon's earlier restaurant one of the district's most popular eateries - is joined on the menu by duck-embellished sushi rolls, duck salad and even duck polenta.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new Hunan House in Cherry Hill is living proof that looks can be deceiving. A blazing neon sign in the front window of this tiny shopping center restaurant emphasizes takeout service, and from busy Route 70, the restaurant looks hardly big enough to hold more than two or three tables. Hunan House is, in fact, a pretty little place serving very good Chinese cuisine for up to 50 diners. Instead of emphasizing its takeout service, the restaurant should really tell you that it is one of the few restaurants that offer free delivery, in this case to any place in Cherry Hill, Haddonfield or Pennsauken.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
As David's Fortune Cookie shows, good Chinese restaurants - long clustered in the Cherry Hill area - are fanning out through South Jersey; indeed, this year-old Medford restaurant can hold its own with the region's best. The menu offers a sensible number of dishes, including several that are seldom found in the region. Best of all, the chef's level of accomplishment is high; even the dozen or so spicy Szechuan and Hunan dishes are somewhat more fiery than many chefs will dare. The restaurant also is one of the few that offers Peking duck ($l9)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
There are a number of Chinese restaurants that employ the word empress in their names. So many that at times it sparks confusion. But there is no confusion when it comes to Trudie Ball's Empress - the name and the place are easy to remember. Empress claims that it is famous for its Peking duck. That's probably true, but it is also famous for its high ceilings, its nonconformist decor and its very reasonably priced, well-prepared dishes. And it is noted for being one of the first popular Chinese restaurants in the city outside of Chinatown.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is hard to believe, but the Oriental Inn has been in business more than nine years, a long time by Chinese restaurant standards. Thankfully, the food is still far superior to most other places; indeed, the place remains one of South Jersey's best Chinese restaurants. The relatively large dining room is decorated traditionally with red- flocked wallpaper, giant temple lanterns, Chinese scrolls and panels, a giant landscape painting, even Chinese symbols painted on room dividers.
NEWS
February 21, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the Chinese New Year celebrations still going on, it seems appropriate to take another look at the Peking Restaurant in Media, one of the region's oldest Chinese restaurants. Open since 1974, a phenomenally long time for a Chinese restaurant, the Granite Run Mall dining place has consistently served above-average food, some of it imaginative, at acceptable prices. For 4686, the Year of the Dragon, owner Margaret Kuo has put together a special holiday dinner that, combined with the regular menu, gives several good dining choices; the one holiday dish sampled was the best part of a recent meal.
FOOD
September 30, 2010
Albertson's Cooking School, P.O. Box 27, Wynnewood. 610-649-9290 ( www.albertsoncooking school.com). Authentic Vietnamese, with chef David Boyle of Davios, at Madsen Center, 2901 Springfield Rd., Broomall. Oct. 25, 6:30-9 p.m., $45. Atlantic Cape Community College Academy of Culinary Arts, 5100 Black Horse Pike, Mays Landing, 609-343-4829 ( www.atlantic.edu/aca ). Degree programs and continuing-education classes available. Avalon Restaurant , 312 S. High St., West Chester, 610-436-6100 ( www . avalonrestaurant.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
October 18, 2012
Midtown Village has a wealth of cuisines, but Szechuan was not one of them until recently when Jack Chen, who owns Chinatown's Sakura Mandarin, moved in with Spice 28, a restaurant-lounge just a few steps off the 13th Street restaurant row. Spice 28 cooks a credible dan dan noodle and kung pao chicken, but the Asian-fusion appetizers, made for pairing with cocktails, are the stars. Blue crab fajitas look like stuffed flat sandwiches whose crab-spread filling provides a cool counterpoint.
FOOD
September 30, 2010
Albertson's Cooking School, P.O. Box 27, Wynnewood. 610-649-9290 ( www.albertsoncooking school.com). Authentic Vietnamese, with chef David Boyle of Davios, at Madsen Center, 2901 Springfield Rd., Broomall. Oct. 25, 6:30-9 p.m., $45. Atlantic Cape Community College Academy of Culinary Arts, 5100 Black Horse Pike, Mays Landing, 609-343-4829 ( www.atlantic.edu/aca ). Degree programs and continuing-education classes available. Avalon Restaurant , 312 S. High St., West Chester, 610-436-6100 ( www . avalonrestaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
It's easy to get distracted by the sideline pursuits of Michael Schulson's culinary career, from hosting B-list TV food shows such as TLC's Pantry Raid and Ultimate Cake-Off to a spice-company endorsement and his mail-order line of frozen dumplings. But beyond the poster-boy tousled hair and brand-building ambitions, Schulson has also proven to be a cook with legitimate skills, an Asian fusion ace as adept at truffling edamame dumplings as he is at tracking the spotlight.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
If your dream is to adopt a bundle of joy, the Philadelphia Zoo has bundles ranging from a few pounds to more than five tons. For 20 years, the zoo has invited people to adopt any of its 1,700 residents for donations of as little as $25. To help celebrate that anniversary, on every Monday this month the zoo will be offering Daily News readers the chance to win an adoption of a zoo resident. Today's Adopt-a-Critter contest adoptee is a white Peking duck, originally from China.
FOOD
March 21, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
If ever there was a beloved dive, it was the old Sang Kee in Chinatown. Its crispy Peking duck and wonton soup were always more than enough to lure a devoted league of adventurous diners. They saw beyond - yes, even relished - the plain white walls of its dingy 40-seat dining room, as unadorned and anonymous as any other Chinatown storefront. Even owner-chefMichael Chow (Sang Kee means "Michael's Restaurant" in Chinese) recalls with a certain measure of satisfaction how "people used to say it was a hole in the wall.
FOOD
August 10, 1997 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Joe Poon is up to some new tricks. The wisecracking, veggie-sculpting chef (original owner of Joe Poon's Peking Duck House) has an upscale new restaurant that plays mind games with those who think of our Chinatown's Chinese food as locked into tradition. At the new Joseph Poon, spinach nachos arrive with the wonton soup. Grilled Chinese-spiced cuttlefish gets an Italian dressing of balsamic vinegar and extra-virgin olive oil. A classic version of Peking duck - the dish that made Poon's earlier restaurant one of the district's most popular eateries - is joined on the menu by duck-embellished sushi rolls, duck salad and even duck polenta.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When Joe's Peking Duck House opened back in 1984, it became an overnight sensation. It wasn't much larger than a duck pen, and you certainly wouldn't frequent it for the decor. But you went for the food. During the short period of time it takes most restaurants to get their feet wet, Joe's became a Chinatown mainstay. It was the kind of place many people seemed to assume had been there nearly forever. And because of the name, many people also thought that Joe Poon was its sole owner.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | By Ginny Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although the Chinese have been showcasing duck their own special way for centuries without colliding with the law, Peking ducks are on the Philadelphia Health Department's Most Wanted list. Inspectors say the crisp, reddish-brown delicacies shouldn't be displayed for hours on end in the windows of restaurants in Chinatown. Hanging around like that promotes the growth of bacteria, they say, which can make diners sick. Joe Poon, ebullient owner of Joe's Peking Duck House in Chinatown, has a very American response to that: "Forget it!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
One of the great Chinatown lunch bargains is undoubtedly at Tang's Peking Duck House where, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., you can get soup, egg roll, fried rice and a platter for less than $5. That's a price even one of those curbside food trucks might have difficulty meeting. There are additional pluses attached to this bargain. The food is well- prepared and the restaurant has a comfortable and relaxing aura. Portions are more than ample. At one lunch, we even had leftovers.
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