CollectionsPen Pals
IN THE NEWS

Pen Pals

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / PAOLA TAGLIAMONTE
Two servicemen who served in Operation Desert Storm - Chris Niles, a Navy corpsman, and Sam Galarza of the Marines - paid a visit Monday to Hillendale Elementary School in Chadds Ford to answer students' questions about the Persian Gulf war. Fourth and fifth graders at the school corresponded with Niles' and Galarza's battalion while it was overseas.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | By Greg McCullough, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Second graders from a class at the William Cramp Elementary School, North Philadelphia, boarded a bus yesterday morning and headed off to another world in search of their pen pals. "A lot of the children think that crossing the bridge to get here is like crossing the ocean," said teacher Lorraine Scott after the group arrived on the lush green of Haverford College's Elwell Field. Helping bridge the gap were about 30 Haverford and Bryn Mawr College students, who signed up several months ago to become pen pals with members of Scott's class.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The following report is about a blue plate special that cost its buyer $14,850. And no, it wasn't the special of of the day at the Melrose Diner. The winning bid for this Vermont white-on-blue porcelain automobile tag is believed to be the highest figure ever paid for an antique license plate, reports the collectors publication Old Cars Weekly. The auction was held in the Vermont village of Townshend. The person who made the winning bid for the plate requested anonymity. The number "9" plate has the lowest number known to survive in a series of tags issued between 1905-07, said reporter Keith Marvin.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The smiles on their faces said it all: The music of children was a welcome sound. Especially welcome because the children were their pals. Pen pals. To mark National Nursing Home Week last week, the residents of Harlee Manor Nursing Home in Springfield got together with youngsters from the Walden School in Swarthmore with whom they have been exchanging letters. The younger correspondents, from first through eighth grade, performed on the piano or sang for the older correspondents such tunes as the theme from Beauty and the Beast.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
"Ready, now go," Todd Flynn, 11, yelled with all the authority he could muster while clinging to the video camera on his shoulder. If he didn't stay still, the shot at Red Bank Battlefield would be squiggly. He shifted his weight and pointed the camera at Matthew Galbraith, 11, standing square, his shoulders as stiff as the breeze whipping off the Delaware at the Red Bank Memorial. "I said, 'Go,' " Todd hollered at his classmate. "In October of 1777, 1,200 Hessians attacked Fort Mercer, which used to stand here," Matthew started, reading from a paper he had to grip with two hands to save from the wind.
NEWS
June 16, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a day for finally putting a face with a name. Meridith Laskin, 7, predicted that Cherese Verdi, 8, would have long, black hair. Cherese bounced into the room, her smiling face surrounded by blond curls. Cherese, on the other hand, had figured Meridith for a blonde with short hair. Wrong again. Meridith had long, dark hair. But then, these girls had met only on paper - pen pals who began their school-year-long correspondence in October. The affair Thursday at the Lynnewood School was the seventh annual Pen Pal Picnic, the culmination of letter writing between second graders of teachers Mary Stein at Lynnewood and Marge Vowler at the Manoa School.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Jeanne Lennon, 58, and Barbara Kitchen, 59, have been friends since they were teenagers, but they met face to face for the first time Sunday . The two women formed a friendship 43 years ago, and it has developed through the written word. Lennon, of Upper Darby, and Kitchen, of Devon, England, never even thought of communicating by phone until October 1986. That telephone conversation led to a visit by Kitchen. "I wrote in early 1986 and suggested we exchange phone numbers, and one day my husband, Dennis, simply said, 'Why don't you give her a call?
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Fourth graders at Lynnewood Elementary School in Haverford Township School District have adopted the members of a Navy fleet hospital, a 500-bed medical outpost in Saudi Arabia, as pen pals. The students have been writing regularly to the soldiers at the hospital since September. One of the fourth graders, Dennis Mahoney, has an uncle, Michael Mahoney, a medical doctor, stationed with the hospital. Dennis and his teacher, Kay Shearer, organized the program, which now includes other fourth-grade classes.
NEWS
June 15, 1988
The last thing anybody heard, Gov. Casey was still reading the report of his own judicial reform commission. But that explanation for his silence on the commission's sweeping recommendations is becoming shopworn now that the governor has had the report for five months, even in the unlikely event that he really is a slow reader. It's apparent Mr. Casey has little or no interest at this time in implementing the chief recommendations of the commission, which called for establishing a non-elective system of selecting appellate judges in Pennsylvania and strengthening the state's judicial disciplinary procedures.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Sharon Matthews knew she couldn't take a textbook approach to teaching her seventh graders about growing old. So the 34-year-old home economics teacher at Medford Township Memorial Middle School sought help from a local retirement community. With the aid of Medford Leas resident Newlin Smith, about 25 residents of the development were enlisted, starting in late November, to become pen pals with Matthews' 160 seventh-graders. "I wanted to let the students know that when you are older, you still have a lot to offer," Matthews said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
After the release of her Pulitzer Prize-winning Civil War novel, Gone With the Wind , author Margaret Mitchell exchanged letters with a fan in Montgomery County, providing a unique glimpse of the book's creation and characters. Not much is known of the recipient, Mrs. Harold Jennings, not even her first name. But the Wyncote woman's previously unpublished Mitchell letters are now part of an ongoing online auction expected to bring up to $30,000 by its conclusion Thursday. In the correspondence, Mitchell wrote Jennings that she "had every detail" of the epic novel in her head before setting "a single word on paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
It all began when the girls were 10-year-olds, clutching pencils at their school desks and writing letters to a stranger halfway around the world. The class assignment ended, but the connection didn't. Now, almost 30 years later, Tina Fuoco of Philadelphia, U.S.A., and Vanessa Hunt of Auckland, New Zealand, are still in touch. Randomly matched when Fuoco was a fifth grader at Haddonfield Friends School and Hunt was a student at Bucklands Beach Primary School, their relationship was bonded by countless missives sent in airmail envelopes, cassette tapes, eventually e-mail, and now Facebook messages.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | Associated Press
CORINTH, Miss. - A Mississippi man was arrested Wednesday, accused of sending letters to President Obama and Sen. Roger Wicker that tested positive for the poisonous substance ricin. Paul Kevin Curtis, 45, was arrested at 5:15 p.m. at his apartment in Corinth, near the Tennessee state line about 100 miles east of Memphis, said FBI Special Agent in Charge Daniel McMullen. It wasn't immediately known where he was being held. Authorities still waited for definitive tests on the letters to Obama and Wicker, R-Miss.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: I'm a contented, widowed, retired elementary-school teacher. I live in the same condo complex as my fraternal twin sister and her seventh husband. She has always been a cougar — never satisfied with what she has. She's attractive and looks 15 years younger than her age. For almost a year she has been pen pals with a handsome man 30 years her junior. They exchange naughty nude photos and have phone sex. She likes the fantasy, but he wants it to become reality by flying across country for a long, steamy weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2010
DEAR ABBY: I am a parole officer, and while I agree with and support your response to "Smitten in New York," I would like to offer an additional comment. People can and do change their lives while incarcerated. However, when they are in a controlled environment, their changed lives on the outside are still in their imaginations. Many inmates who make very positive plans for their future when they're released, discover that life "on the outs" doesn't unfold the way they imagined it would.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010
DEAR ABBY: I have been writing to an inmate from the Florida prison system for about two years. It has slowly developed into more than a friendship. "Mike" is a born-again Christian, as am I. He doesn't get out until 2013 at the earliest, so we have plenty of time to see where this goes. Am I wrong for considering someone who is in prison? Mike has made mistakes, nothing violent, and has turned his life around. If he does become part of my life, how do I introduce him to my family so they may better accept him?
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
The career criminal and a raven-haired sidekick accused of murdering an Atlantic City tourist are now in different jails, nearly 40 miles apart, because of jailhouse letters discovered by authorities. Craig Arno and Jessica Kisby are still in the same troubled legal boat, though, and it's one that keeps sinking as more charges pile on. Arno, 44, of Atlantic City, and his accomplice, Kisby, 24, of Egg Harbor Township, pleaded not guilty to murder charges yesterday in Atlantic County Superior Court in connection with the stabbing death of Martin Caballero, a grocery-store manager from North Bergen, N.J., in the Trump Taj Mahal parking garage on May 21. Atlantic County Prosecutor Ted Housel said Kisby was moved to the Salem County Jail Friday, after authorities discovered she had written letters to Arno in the jail.
NEWS
August 22, 2008 | Daily News reporters Catherine Lucey, Chris Brennan, John Baer, Michael Hinkelman and Bob Warner contributed to this report
THE CORPORATIONS that used to finance nonstop partying at the national political conventions face a new hurdle this time around. A new law prohibits lobbyists from buying meals for members of Congress - leading to some odd party-planning. One tactic - don't provide chairs. People don't eat "meals" standing up. Another tactic - no forks, just finger food. Gov. Rendell told reporters yesterday that he can live with the restrictions. "We never had forks at the convention," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the age of instant-messaging, we're offered a love story about pen pals who relish the delayed gratification of touching hearts before touching flesh? Such is The Lake House, an enjoyably sudsy romance starring a moody Keanu Reeves, a broody Sandra Bullock, and the titular structure - a jewel box of glass and steel perched on stilts over Lake Michigan. There's just one little wrinkle: a wrinkle in time. Kate (Bullock), a doctor, lives in 2006, while Alex (Reeves), an architect, exists in 2004.
NEWS
November 5, 2004 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The stack of files on her desk, the line of young prosecutors outside her office vying for her attention, and the constantly ringing telephone made it clear that the relentless pace of Wendy Demchick-Alloy's life as Montgomery County's sex-crimes expert left little time for much else. She realized she needed to choose in September when the first day of school for her two daughters came and went - and she didn't have time to ask them about their day. The next day, Demchick-Alloy submitted her resignation to her boss, District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. Her last official day at the District Attorney's Office is today.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|