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NEWS
December 25, 1991 | By Sue Chastain, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report are the Associated Press, USA Today, The Washington Post, The New York Daily News and Reuters
It started out as a novelty stocking stuffer but just may turn out to be the collectible of the season. The item: a white No. 2 pencil with gold lettering, printed up by Kitty Bayh, wife of former Indiana senator Birch Bayh. The inscription: "I Believe Her. " "I had them printed up after the Clarence Thomas hearings, not even thinking about the William Kennedy Smith trial," Bayh said. "I should have put 'I believe Anita' on them. " But the pencils are proving versatile since Smith's acquittal on rape charges filed by Patricia Bowman.
NEWS
July 10, 2000 | by Michelle Malkin
The most valuable truths about economics and liberty can be found in a lowly lead pencil. When my children are old enough, I will read them a classic little essay by the late philosopher Leonard E. Read that turns a mundane writing instrument into an elementary lesson about free-market capitalism. "I, Pencil" teaches what left-wing fossils on college campuses to this day refuse to admit: Governments and bureaucrats don't make what people want and need. They only get in the way. It is individuals, cooperating peacefully and voluntarily, working together without mandate or central design, who produce the world's goods and services.
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lew Trowbridge is a big, bear of a man with a ready smile, the build of a former college football player and a stock of trivia culled from steady Jeopardy! viewing. The New Jersey State Police detective has been a road trooper, a narcotics officer and a training academy gun-range instructor. But, for the last 11 years, his weapon of choice has been a slim, silver mechanical pencil. With that pencil, Trowbridge - one of the state police's two composite artists - has helped track down some of the region's most notorious criminals: John List, who murdered his entire family in Westfield in 1971 and then disappeared for 18 years before being caught.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | By Bill Frischling, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a small corner room on the second floor of a home on Aldwyn Lane, the future takes its shape in pencil-traced outlines on sketching paper. Following a simple command, "Miguel is hanging upside down, ropes coiled around his body," Rick Leonardi creates a dark image of a bound man dangling above a crowd of angry, futuristic people carrying swords and other weapons. The image, a rough sketch, still transmits his image of an anti-utopia where Miguel O'Hara takes the place of the original Spiderman, Peter Parker, to fight larger-than-life evil dudes in the comic book series Spiderman 2099.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a PTA meeting at the Haviland Avenue School last night, school officials defended their response to a September pencil-stabbing incident that sent a sixth grader to a doctor. Some Haviland parents had complained that Audubon school officials kept them in the dark about the incident and meted out a weak punishment. Police were not immediately notified of the incident, and the boy who jabbed the pencil was given an hour of detention and a one-day, in-school suspension. Audubon officials, while saying they recognized the public's concern about school violence in the year of the Columbine school slayings, called the stabbing an isolated incident and said their disciplinary actions were appropriate.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2000 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Back when Harvey Pollack first started his gig keeping statistics for Philadelphia's National Basketball Association franchise, things were about as low-tech as they come. It was the late 1940s, and Eddie Gottlieb, the owner of the Philadelphia Warriors, often did not have the proverbial two nickels to rub together. But Pollack always found an extra pencil and paper to mark down the shots, rebounds, and assorted other stats that he could gather during the games. It has been his mission since.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
If you missed it in Saturday's paper, the Editorial Board's 2004 Year-in-Review Crossword Puzzle can be found online at inquirer.philly.com/ opinion/. Click on "Philly Year-in-Review Puzzle, 2004", make a printout, and put pencil to puzzle. Entries must be postmarked by tomorrow. Send them to The Inquirer Editorial Board, c/o Carolyn Davis, P.O. Box 41705, Philadelphia, 19101.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
An elderly Northeast Philadelphia woman lost her life savings of $30,000 yesterday when two women talked their way into her home and took the money from a bedroom drawer, police said. The 86-year-old woman, who lived with a sister in the Oxford Circle section, had withdrawn the money from a bank so she could have it readily available when she needed to pay doctor bills, police said. Detective Kenneth Biddle of the Northeast Detective Division said the incident was the largest theft in more than a half-dozen similar crimes in which elderly Northeast residents have been bilked out of money in the last four months.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2007
Written and directed by Mike White. With Molly Shannon, Regina King, Josh Pais, John C. Reilly, Peter Sarsgaard. 1 hour, 37 mins. PG-13 (mature themes, profanity) Distributed by Paramount Vantage. In Year of the Dog , Molly Shannon, button-eyed and purse-lipped, resembles Julia Louis-Dreyfus' wan sister, earnest rather than ironic, timid rather than bold. What animates Peggy (Shannon) is . . . animals. Specifically her beagle. Pencil and Peggy are the perfect couple, an ideal of mutual understanding.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Initiative is a wonderful quality, part of what made America great. For example, there used to be a Chicago cop on the South Side who made a practice of carrying a couple of dozen wood pencils in his pocket while on duty. When he stopped a motorist for a traffic violation, he would explain the seriousness of the offense. Then, in a friendly manner, he would say: "I have three kinds of pencils which I sell - a $5 pencil, a $10 pencil and a $25 pencil. " Depending on the degree of the violation, he would then tell the motorist what kind of pencil was appropriate.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The cropped top and matching pencil skirt are staging a comeback so sleek that it's surely on the way to silhouette-of-the-year status. Nearly every runway designer or private label took a stab this spring at this version of matchy-matchy: Alexander Wang created a trés sexy version for Balenciaga that featured a ribcage-grazing midriff in black leather and a matching sheer skirt. Humberto Leon and Carol Lim dropped their cropped tops to the waist for Kenzo. Fashioned from white eyelet fabric that's patterned to look like smiling emojis, these skirt-and-top ensembles are perfect for happy, summer days.
NEWS
August 30, 2013
B uzz: Hey Marnie, how come they add such strange ingredients to wine? Marnie: I'm not sure what you mean, Buzz. By definition, wines are made with 100 percent grapes. Buzz: I was reading a bottle label at the store the other day that said the wine had gooseberries and cut grass in it. Marnie: Those weren't ingredients, Buzz. They were wine "descriptors," terms used to describe wine's sensory traits - usually smells. Since there are so few words for aromas, winemakers often compare their wines to foods and other things that have distinctive scents.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2011
LONG AGO, I went into journalism - as do many naïve young men - harboring the ridiculously stereotypical fantasy that I might someday become that hard-drinking, cigar-chomping, Mencken-esque city columnist of yesteryear. In the black-and-white newsreel of my imagination, my workday would end like this: After banging out 800 words of tough-guy prose, I would rise from my Underwood, adjust my fedora (with the press card tucked into the hat band) and slip off to the local press club. There, at a dark and smoky bar populated with rogue characters, I would order a double rye with a beer back.
SPORTS
September 29, 2011 | By Bill Iezzi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shawnee's Emily Arnot has been painting pretty pictures with her field hockey stick on South Jersey landscapes natural and artificial over the last four years. The midfielder is an artful dodger and passer who can place the ball on the sticks of forwards in the circle, resulting in scores and prompting Shawnee coach Renee Phelps to call her an "unsung hero. " Arnot has only two assists so far because there have been multiple touches on the ball she sends into the circle before it goes in the net. However, she has a way of finding the back of the net on her own - she has scored five goals in eight games.
SPORTS
May 24, 2011 | By DAVID MURPHY, dmurphy@phillynews.com
Four thousand, three-hundred and twenty-four times Chase Utley had taken that walk from the on-deck circle to home plate. Never before had he done it like this. After doing his best to tune out a lengthy standing ovation from a home crowd that had waited 46 games for his arrival, Utley dug into the batter's box, took a fastball for a ball, then made solid contact on 1-0 sinker. The at-bat, like four others he would take last night, ended in an out. But after nearly 3 months of pain-staking rehabilitation, his mere presence on a baseball field was accomplishment enough.
SPORTS
February 28, 2011 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
INDIANAPOLIS - After his sophomore year at Temple, Muhammad Wilkerson made two changes. He moved from defensive tackle to defensive end, and he made a more unusual transition for a lineman, taking jersey No. 9, instead of 96. The number switch was a sign of his standing on the team, where former coach Al Golden had rules about who could wear single digits. To earn that right, you had to be a person who "did things right, on or off the field, and was recognized by your peers as one of the toughest players on the team," Wilkerson said Sunday at the NFL scouting combine.
SPORTS
November 12, 2010
ABOUT THE only thing certain concerning Randy Moss this season is that no other receiver in recent memory has done so little, but been discussed so much. The reason is simple: potential. Moss has yet to reach 100 yards this season and is 63rd among wide receivers in catches. Some of those with more receptions are Chansi Stuckey, Earl Bennett and Jason Avant , who is generally the Eagles' fifth option when he's on the field. For all the plays Moss takes off, there are the highlight-reel touchdowns.
SPORTS
August 21, 2010
CINCINNATI - Very few NFL teams buy their offensive tackles at Kmart anymore. Peruse the league's depth charts and you'll find that most of the starters at that position are high-round blue bloods. Of the 32 Week 1 starting tackles in the NFC last season, 25 were selected in the first four rounds of the draft, including 14 first-rounders. Only four of those 32 starters entered the league as undrafted free agents. Which brings us to Austin Howard. The 6-7, 333-pound rookie from Northern Iowa, who signed with the Eagles after getting snubbed in the April draft, has been one of the revelations of the summer.
NEWS
November 3, 2009 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
High school for the Malfi sisters of Burlington Township is the difference between e-mail and a shopping cart. Megan Malfi, a junior at Holy Cross High School in Delran, has her own tablet PC supplied by the school. She e-mails her electronic homework to her teachers' virtual drop-box. Melissa Malfi graduated from Holy Cross two years ago. There was no portable personal computer for her. She dropped her neatly typed and stapled assignments into the grocery store shopping cart that her history teacher kept parked in the classroom.
NEWS
October 17, 2007 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas Snyder can crack an easy Sudoku nearly as fast as he can write. The really hard ones take a minute or two longer. That dazzling speed has made him the reigning world champ of the American-born game with the Japanese name. And it makes him the puzzler to beat when he comes to town this weekend to compete in the first U.S. Sudoku championship, sponsored by The Inquirer. "Most people who know of me consider me the favorite," says Snyder, 27, who won the world championship in Prague in March.
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