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NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Weld Coxe, Special to The Inquirer
Redress - 1 to set right; rectify or remedy Re-dress - to dress again - Webster's New World Dictionary Although much of the current attention of architectural observers is focused on the future of postmodernism, an equally significant architectural development is going on with buildings of the past. It is a contradiction. At one and the same time our society is: Restoring with historical accuracy most of the older, eclectic architectural excesses of the past, ranging from the City Hall tower to the Frank Furness Library at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 19, 2007
NEW ORLEANS - A $2.2 million grant from the Rockefeller Foundation will fund more than a dozen positions for urban redevelopment professionals to work on Hurricane Katrina recovery efforts, New Orleans' recovery director, Ed Blakely, said yesterday. The University of Pennsylvania's Center for Urban Redevelopment Excellence, which is running the foundation's fellowship program, expects to hire 15 people from a variety of fields and disciplines, including real estate, finance and economic development.
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | By Roger Cohn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not even Barbara J. Kaplan, executive director of the City Planning Commission, knows exactly how the numbering system in the Penn Center office corridor west of City Hall works. Which building is 5 Penn Center, and which is 11 Penn Center? Even Kaplan admits she sometimes has to consult one of the Center City maps in her office or ask for an exact street location before heading to an appointment in one of the buildings. And so, life for Kaplan - and perhaps for a lot of other folks who have ever wandered along Market Street in search of a specific building in Penn Center - was simplified a little yesterday as 3 Penn Center, the first in the corridor of office buildings that extends west to 19th Street, was officially renamed 1515 Market Street.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's law school will launch a center focused on improving the country's criminal justice system with a $15 million gift from a banker and alumnus who spent several years fighting charges in the criminal justice system, the university said this week. Former Credit Suisse Group banker Frank Quattrone was convicted of obstructing a federal probe into Credit Suisse First Boston, but the verdict was overturned on appeal in 2006. The government agreed to drop its case if Quattrone did not break the law for a year.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Universities are brimming with research, and four in the Philadelphia region rank in the top 50 worldwide for the number of U.S. patents granted for groundbreaking technologies in 2015. The University of Pennsylvania was No. 19 among 600 universities, with 93 patents issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office last year. Rutgers University ranked 27th, with 65 patents. The University of Pittsburgh came in 35th, with 58 patents. Drexel University was No. 49 with 42 patents issued in 2015.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, Staff Writer
Here's how simple it can be to bring someone back from the brink of death: It took just a few minutes Tuesday to train dozens of people in hands-only CPR. Eager volunteers, from teens to seniors, leaned over specially designed dummies outside the WHYY studios, pushing firm and fast to music selected to inspire the right speed: 100 beats a minute. As for pressure? The more the better, said Benjamin Abella, the physician who is leading the new Mobile CPR Project Philadelphia. No need to worry about further injuring a person in cardiac arrest, said Abella, who directs Penn's Center for Resuscitation Science.
NEWS
February 18, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Alexander Calder's "Three Disks, One Lacking" is to be moved today from this site at 8 Penn Center to the Reading Terminal Headhouse. The city bought the work in 1969. The Headhouse opens Sunday.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | By Andy Wallace and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
Frank G. Binswanger, 88, founder and former chairman of the Binswanger Co., who put trolleys in Fairmount Park, got Penn Center development off the ground and plugged Philadelphia around the world and from pole to pole, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Tireless, enormously creative and lucky, Mr. Binswanger built the Binswanger Co. into one of the largest industrial real estate firms in the country between 1932 and 1973, when he retired and turned the company over to his three sons.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1992 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
The upkeep of the corridors outside the businesses in the Penn Center- Suburban Station Concourse can be a dirty affair. Take, for example, the corridor dividing two facing businesses, Cookie Express and Bakery, and Old City Coffee. The half of the corridor outside Old City Coffee is regularly swept, mopped and waxed, says Valerie Fucetola, owner of Cookie Express and Bakery. But the half outside Fucetola's business is caked with black dirt and grime. "You see that red spot there," she says, pointing to the floor.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Universities are brimming with research, and four in the Philadelphia region rank in the top 50 worldwide for the number of U.S. patents granted for groundbreaking technologies in 2015. The University of Pennsylvania was No. 19 among 600 universities, with 93 patents issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office last year. Rutgers University ranked 27th, with 65 patents. The University of Pittsburgh came in 35th, with 58 patents. Drexel University was No. 49 with 42 patents issued in 2015.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
John Quigley, who resigned in May as Gov. Wolf's environmental protection secretary, will join the University of Pennsylvania's Kleinman Center for Energy Policy as a senior fellow on July 1. Quigley, who was forced to resign after he sent a private email encouraging environmental activists to lobby for gas-drilling regulations, "brings a wealth of policy expertise to Penn's students and faculty," Mark Alan Hughes, the Kleinman Center's director, said...
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, Staff Writer
Here's how simple it can be to bring someone back from the brink of death: It took just a few minutes Tuesday to train dozens of people in hands-only CPR. Eager volunteers, from teens to seniors, leaned over specially designed dummies outside the WHYY studios, pushing firm and fast to music selected to inspire the right speed: 100 beats a minute. As for pressure? The more the better, said Benjamin Abella, the physician who is leading the new Mobile CPR Project Philadelphia. No need to worry about further injuring a person in cardiac arrest, said Abella, who directs Penn's Center for Resuscitation Science.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
Hemispherx Biopharma Inc., Philadelphia, said it terminated its founder, chairman, and CEO William A. Carter, 77, and reorganized the management team "to provide effective and competent leadership" and position the "company to achieve its commercial goals and increase stockholder value. " The company named William M. Mitchell, professor of pathology, microbiology and immunology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, as chairman of Hemispherx' board. David R. Strayer will be chief scientific officer, and Adam Pascale was named chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth Grice, a University of Pennsylvania assistant professor, embodies the new way that academia and drug companies collaborate on research to generate cash for schools and profitable medicines for manufacturers. Grice, like many researchers, gets most of her funding from government agencies such as the National Institutes of Health and foundations. Like some, she also is doing work for a for-profit pharmaceutical company - in her case, Janssen Pharmaceuticals. What's changed in recent years is the nature of that academic-industry relationship.
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania has tapped coworking-space operator Benjamin's Desk to run its Pennovation Center research and business hub. Benjamin's Desk will operate two floors of shared workspace and laboratories and one floor of Penn engineering labs in the 58,000-square-foot facility, company spokesman Joe Taylor Jr. said Thursday. The building, a former industrial structure, is part of the $37.5 million first phase of development of the 23-acre Pennovation Works site along the southern bank of the Schuylkill.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Kleinman Center for Energy Policy announced Monday that it will bestow its inaugural $25,000 Carnot Prize on Daniel Yergin, the energy historian. Yergin, vice chairman of the research firm IHS, will receive the prize Oct. 12 at the official opening of the center's new space in Penn's Fisher Fine Arts Library. The prize recognizes "distinguished contributions to energy policy. " The Kleinman Center, which is associated with Penn's School of Design, was established last year.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hoping to ride the recent biotechnology stock boom, Regenxbio Inc., a gene-therapy firm with local ties, began selling shares publicly on the NASDAQ stock market Thursday. When the IPO was priced on Wednesday, the company sold 6.3 million shares at $22 through underwriters, thereby raising $138.6 million. Regenxbio was cofounded by University of Pennsylvania researcher James M. Wilson, whose 1999 clinical trial ended with the death of an 18-year-old patient. Besides anguish for his family, Jesse Gelsinger's death set back gene-therapy research for at least a decade.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THE HUB OF HOPE is headed back home. After Project HOME's seasonal social-services center for the homeless was inexplicably shut out of its old space inside Suburban Station, it was told that it could return. Talk about a welcome about-face. In November, the landlord who had donated the space for the past three winters sent word that he no longer would be able to do so, "due to complaints from tenants and brokers. " What those complaints were was anyone's guess, because no one in the know was talking.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
BY NOW, the Hub of Hope, Project HOME's seasonal social-service center for the homeless in Suburban Station, should be buzzing with men and women wanting to see a case worker or a doctor or just get a short reprieve from the cold with a tepid cup of coffee or a pair of socks. But in a cruel irony, the Hub of Hope is homeless. In November, the landlord who had donated the space for the past three winters sent word that he would no longer be able to "due to complaints from tenants and brokers.
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