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BUSINESS
August 22, 2010 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evan Kohlmann had just settled into his seat on his first day of law school at the University of Pennsylvania on Sept. 11, 2001, when he was overcome with a sense of foreboding. Law school was going to be boring. The course that day was civil procedure, an arcane body of law laying out rules for courts hearing civil lawsuits. Very important stuff in the legal world, to be sure, but the start of the class only confirmed Kohlmann's sense, building for weeks, that legal studies really didn't interest him and that he had made a terrible mistake.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Law students at the University of Pennsylvania will be required to perform at least 70 hours of unpaid public service under a plan approved yesterday by the Penn Law faculty. The new graduation requirement, which will take effect with the entering class this fall, is the first of its kind at a major law school, according to Penn officials. "With the new pro bono program, we hope to foster the habit of public service as part of the professional life and responsibility of the lawyer by building it into the students' law school experience," said Robert H. Mundheim, Penn Law dean.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
The University of Pennsylvania law school on Monday officially dedicated a new courtroom at Golkin Hall that was funded by Philadelphia plaintiffs lawyers Thomas Kline and Shanin Specter, on behalf of their law firm, Kline & Specter P.C. The courtroom will be used for student education and includes the latest in courtroom technology, the law firm said. Golkin Hall, a newly constructed 40,000 square foot addition to the law school campus, itself will be officially dedicated April 5 at an event to be attended by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael A. Fitts, dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school since 2000, has been named president of Tulane University in New Orleans and will take over there July 1. Penn made the announcement late Tuesday afternoon, praising Fitts' leadership of the law school during a time of significant academic change. "Mike Fitts is an inspired choice to become the next president of Tulane University," Penn president Amy Gutmann said. "He is a skilled and strategic leader whose vision has propelled Penn Law to ever greater heights.
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Wolfman, 87, the University of Pennsylvania Law School dean from 1970 to 1975, died of heart failure Saturday, Aug. 20, while visiting a relative in West Orange, N.J. He resided in Cambridge, Mass. Michael A. Fitts, current Penn Law dean, wrote in an appreciation on the Penn Law website: "For more than 60 years, Bernie was a highly distinguished tax academic and expert - as well as a very loyal Penn alumnus. He will be greatly missed. " Mr. Wolfman went on to be Fessenden Professor of Law at Harvard Law School from 1976 to 2007.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a brief but poignant gesture, students at the University of Pennsylvania Law School made a silent statement of protest Tuesday over the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. At noon, more than 60 law students, black and white, gathered in the law school's Great Hall and lay on the marble floor for 41/2 minutes of silence in what they described as a "die-in. " The quick, quiet protest was a reference to the 41/2 hours that Brown's body lay on the street on Aug. 9 after he was fatally shot by Officer Darren Wilson.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Michael Fitts was appointed dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2000, legal education, like the profession itself, was at the beginning of a years-long boom. Hiring at firms exploded and pay at the most sought-after law firms reached stratospheric levels - starting salaries of $145,000 a year in Philadelphia, and higher in New York, Washington, and Los Angeles. Firms made fortunes charging out young, inexperienced lawyers at rates that fueled burgeoning profits.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2012 | By Chris Mondics and Inquirer Staff Writer
When images of Chinese students occupying Tiananmen Square in Beijing and the ensuing government crackdown began flashing across television screens in 1989, Amy Gadsden was simply a curious teenager who wanted to know more. The following year, she went with her father on a business trip to China. He was there to complete the sale of a Pennsylvania steel mill to a factory an hour and a half outside Beijing. She soon was captivated by the Chinese. The energy and dynamism of Chinese society and the sense that the country was on the cusp of historic change eventually helped launch a career that has taken Gadsden from academia to the State Department to a prominent non-governmental organization seeking to promote democracy in China.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capping a two-year construction project, the University of Pennsylvania Law School plans to open a 40,000-square-foot building with a ceremony on April 5 attended by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. The $33.5 million project includes a 350-seat auditorium and courtroom. The building - named Golkin Hall for its lead donors, Penn graduates Perry Golkin and his wife, Donna - faces Sansom Street on Penn's West Philadelphia campus, and more closely connects the other main buildings at the law school, including Silverman Hall, its 110-year-old Georgian-style building, the university said.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was the ultimate lawyer role model, a valiant fighter for human rights who battled against steep odds. The fondest hope of many young lawyers a generation ago was to be like the dashing Gregory Peck as he played Atticus Finch in the film To Kill a Mockingbird . Such was the case for Michael Fitts, dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school, who saw Finch as the embodiment of lawyerly ideals. To Fitts, Finch was a lawyer of incomparable decency, courage, and sure-handedness, as fine a lawyer prototype as you might want.
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NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Towne, 33, was eating lunch in a tent at base camp on Mount Everest when the ground beneath him began to sway. He and others scrambled out of the tent, said Towne, a new graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. That's when "we saw this wall of snow descending to the north. " The avalanche that followed would bury large areas of base camp, killing 19 climbers - just a fraction of the devastation in Nepal, where that magnitude-7.8 earthquake on April 25 and a second one on May 12 left more than 8,000 dead and 20,000 injured and destroyed 489,000 homes.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than most, Ted Ruger understands legal complexity. And a good thing, too. The former Supreme Court law clerk is set to take over as dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school July 1. Penn, along with a handful of other elite U.S. law schools, brands itself as a training ground for top students who learn to grapple with the most difficult legal problems. That's why so many of the highest-paying law firms want to hire them, even in a job market that still is struggling.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A $10 million gift from the W.P. Carey Foundation to endow a joint law and M.B.A. degree program was announced Thursday by the University of Pennsylvania. Students in the program graduate with law and master of business administration degrees, attending both the university's law school and Wharton, its business school. The foundation was established by William Polk Carey, a Penn graduate and founder of W.P. Carey Inc., a real estate investment trust with global operations valued at more than $11 billion.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore Ruger, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School since 2004, has been appointed dean of the law school, effective July 1. Ruger, 46, who teaches constitutional law and health-related law and regulation, succeeds Michael A. Fitts, who left in July to become president of Tulane University. Wendell Pritchett has been interim dean and will continue as a professor on the faculties of the law school and the Graduate School of Education. Pritchett, 50, taught at Penn Law from 2001 to 2009, when he left to become chancellor of Rutgers-Camden.
NEWS
January 18, 2015
ISSUE | FREE SPEECH Echoes of Penn Penn professor Anne Norton purports to protect speech but not bigotry, yet confuses both and protects neither ("Protect free speech, but don't defend bigotry," Jan. 14). Norton's model appears to be her employer, the University of Pennsylvania, which The Inquirer once branded as the nation's most politically correct university. That stemmed from a student's use of the term "water buffalo," for which Penn acted to expel him for violating its speech code.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a brief but poignant gesture, students at the University of Pennsylvania Law School made a silent statement of protest Tuesday over the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. At noon, more than 60 law students, black and white, gathered in the law school's Great Hall and lay on the marble floor for 41/2 minutes of silence in what they described as a "die-in. " The quick, quiet protest was a reference to the 41/2 hours that Brown's body lay on the street on Aug. 9 after he was fatally shot by Officer Darren Wilson.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the University of Pennsylvania Law School, students in professor Leo Katz's criminal law class are equipped with laptops, coffee, and fat red law books. Halfway through class, Katz begins to fire off questions on Barber v. Superior Court . Some students stutter and hesitate. Others breeze through. Together, the class debates the legal difference between killing and letting die. That's a real-life Penn law classroom. A fictional version premiered on Sept. 25, when ABC debuted the series How to Get Away With Murder (Thursdays at 10 p.m.)
BUSINESS
June 24, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Listening to bankers - the local kind - Penn Law professor David Skeel , a historian of bankruptcy, "corporate shaming," and other questions of money and morals, hears two almost contradictory complaints: They feel "hammered" by tighter federal rules - while big nationwide banks, which have more resources to keep regulators at bay, are lending too much. "They are making no-document loans again, and lending to people who shouldn't be borrowing. " So says the author of The New Financial Deal (2010)
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alice Belew Lonsdorf, 89, of Gladwyne, a former assistant dean for alumni affairs at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and a tireless civic leader, died Thursday, April 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at her home in Waverly Heights. "She was entertaining visitors and going to meetings until a week ago," said her son, George. "She was fierce about maintaining her activities until she couldn't. " A Fort Worth, Texas, native, Mrs. Lonsdorf graduated at age 19 from the University of Texas with a bachelor's degree in fine arts.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Michael Fitts was appointed dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2000, legal education, like the profession itself, was at the beginning of a years-long boom. Hiring at firms exploded and pay at the most sought-after law firms reached stratospheric levels - starting salaries of $145,000 a year in Philadelphia, and higher in New York, Washington, and Los Angeles. Firms made fortunes charging out young, inexperienced lawyers at rates that fueled burgeoning profits.
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