CollectionsPenn Law
IN THE NEWS

Penn Law

NEWS
March 7, 2006 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a number of academic leaders, University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann strongly opposed being required to allow military recruiting on Penn's campus or lose federal funding. In September, she said the Pentagon's " 'take it or leave it' attitude" threatened "fundamental First Amendment protections and core values of academia. " So yesterday's 8-0 Supreme Court ruling in the military's favor puts Gutmann and her counterparts in a real bind: Compromise their "core values," by associating their institutions with the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy toward gays in its ranks or forgo billions of dollars in federal funds, about $600 million for Penn alone.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Finished with a 30-year career in the Senate, Arlen Specter will take his talents to the University of Pennsylvania's law school, Penn announced Tuesday. As an adjunct faculty member, Specter will teach an upper-level course on the relationship between Congress and the Supreme Court, beginning in fall 2011, Penn officials said. "It's a subject matter which could use a lot more understanding. And it's a subject which warrants additional study. Penn Law is a good place to do it," Specter, 80, said in an interview.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | By LINDA CHAVEZ
Women, on average, make mediocre law school students. That's a fair summary of the findings from a new study of law students at the University of Pennsylvania. According to the study, women participate less in class than men, receive lower grades and fewer honors, and rate their school experience more negatively. The chief author, Penn law professor Lani Guinier, has impeccable liberal and feminist credentials. Guinier, a former Yale Law School classmate of President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, first gained national recognition when the President tapped her to be his chief civil rights attorney in 1993 but withdrew her nomination when critics assailed her views on voting-rights issues as too radical and left-wing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2011 | By Peter Mucha and John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writers
After setting the table for Sheryl Crow in 2009 and having to endure the ignominy of opening for the Goo Goo Dolls last year, Philadelphia and Late Night With Jimmy Fallon band the Roots will finally get to headline its hometown July 4 celebration! Mayor Nutter announced the bill Tuesday morn for the free concert on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at the Art Museum. Along with the Roots, the lineup includes classic R&Bers Earth Wind & Fire , singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles , blue-eyed Doobie Brother Michael McDonald , British hip-hop soul singer Estelle , and, on the wheels of steel, Philadelphia's DJ Jazzy Jeff . Aaron Neville , whose Joe Henry -produced gospel album I Know I've Been Changed was one of the overlooked treasures of last year, and Philadelphia bass man Gerald Veasley will play Penn's Landing during the Taste of Philadelphia festival, which runs June 24-26.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
CRAIG HETHERINGTON, a 44-year-old Bedford County trucker, held a sign reading, "Pat Toomey, You Are Fired. " Kay Hartman, a Mifflin County "tea-party patriot old enough to be wise," carried a large white flag featuring a black AK-47 over the words "Come and Take It. " Another woman held a sign: "Gun Control is False Hope; Jesus Christ is the True Hope. " And a bearded man wearing a "Don't Tread on Me" red vest held a sign: "We Come Unarmed (this time). " Welcome to the Pennsylvania gun club.
LIVING
December 2, 1993 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six months ago it looked as if "Loony Lani" Guinier, the "Quota Queen," was about to exit the national stage in disgrace. Her old pal Bill Clinton had decided her views on race and voting rights were just too controversial for his administration. On June 3, five weeks after nominating Guinier to be assistant attorney general for civil rights, he yanked her nomination. That was her cue to disappear quietly, the way Zoe Baird and Kimba Wood had done before her. But Lani Guinier hasn't disappeared.
NEWS
March 21, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than half the students enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania Law School have signed a petition protesting a recent faculty vote denying tenure to a popular assistant professor who is regarded as a national expert in jurisprudence. The professor, Drucilla Cornell, who has been teaching at Penn since 1983, plans to file a suit accusing the university of sex discrimination, breach of contract and denial of academic freedom if the tenure vote is not overturned, said Alice Ballard, her attorney.
NEWS
July 19, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul W. Bruton, 84, a former professor of constitutional law at the University of Pennsylvania and the first chairman of the Philadelphia Tax Review Board, died Saturday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Bruton began his teaching career at Penn Law School in 1937 as a visiting associate professor, specializing in constitutional law and federal taxation. He was named a full professor in 1939 and served as the school's acting dean in 1951-52. By the time he retired in 1974, Mr. Bruton had held two endowed chairs - the Ferdinand Wakeman Hubell chair and the Algernon Sidney Biddle chair - and he was the author, with two other scholars, of a major textbook on constitutional law. John Honnold, a former colleague at Penn Law, recalled Mr. Bruton for his intelligence, judgment and, above all, his sense of fairness.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania yesterday named Colin S. Diver, dean of the Boston University School of Law, to head its 750-student law school, one of the oldest and most prestigious in the nation. Diver's family was one of three profiled in J. Anthony Lukas' award-winning 1985 book, Common Ground, a social history of Boston school desegregation. Diver said he expects to assume the dean's post at Penn by Sept. 1. "I know the school well and I realize it is poised to really make a dramatic move in legal education," said Diver, 45, who was a visiting law professor at Penn five years ago. "I just see this as a glittering opportunity.
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert H. Mundheim, dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, will leave the school's top administrative post to return to full-time teaching at the law school next year. In a Dec. 11 letter to Penn President Sheldon Hackney, Mundheim, who has been dean since 1982, said there were "strong personal reasons" for his decision not to seek another term as dean when his seven-year term expires in February. "More importantly," he added, "I think the time is ripe to find new leadership which will be able to consolidate and extend the significant strides the law school has made in reasserting a leadership role in legal education.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|