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Penn Law

NEWS
December 20, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert H. Mundheim, dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, will leave the school's top administrative post to return to full-time teaching at the law school next year. In a Dec. 11 letter to Penn President Sheldon Hackney, Mundheim, who has been dean since 1982, said there were "strong personal reasons" for his decision not to seek another term as dean when his seven-year term expires in February. "More importantly," he added, "I think the time is ripe to find new leadership which will be able to consolidate and extend the significant strides the law school has made in reasserting a leadership role in legal education.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A prominent University of Pennsylvania Law School professor has agreed to join the Harvard faculty, but it isn't Lani Guinier. At least, not this year. "I talked to her this morning and she said she is not going anywhere yet," Penn spokeswoman Barbara Beck said yesterday, referring to a report in the Boston Globe that Guinier would move to Harvard in September. "She is still on sabbatical and she plans to be here in the fall to resume teaching. " The professor who is leaving Penn for Harvard is Elizabeth Warren, who teaches commercial law. Guinier, 45, gained national attention in 1993 when President Clinton nominated her to be assistant attorney general for civil rights, then withdrew that nomination five weeks later because of her controversial views.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jefferson B. Fordham, 88, an educator who was dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School from 1952 until 1970 and a leader in the struggle for racial equality, died Friday in Salt Lake City. A. Leo Levin, a professor emeritus at the law school, said Dr. Fordham "was absolutely a leading force in building the Penn Law School up to great heights. " A six-footer with sparkling blue eyes and enormous energy, Dr. Fordham was called on by everyone from the President to Penn law students for advice.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The venerable University of Pennsylvania Law School has been thrust into controversy over its academic ranking, its loss of top-flight faculty members, its tenure practices and what some critics regard as its tilt toward commercial and corporate law. Almost everyone familiar with the school agrees that the institution, which traces its history to 1790, remains one of the nation's premier centers for the study of law. But many among Penn's status-conscious...
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alice Belew Lonsdorf, 89, of Gladwyne, a former assistant dean for alumni affairs at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and a tireless civic leader, died Thursday, April 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at her home in Waverly Heights. "She was entertaining visitors and going to meetings until a week ago," said her son, George. "She was fierce about maintaining her activities until she couldn't. " A Fort Worth, Texas, native, Mrs. Lonsdorf graduated at age 19 from the University of Texas with a bachelor's degree in fine arts.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the time, the usual order of business for members of the Supreme Court is that they are approached gingerly by supplicant lawyers arguing their cases. They - members of the court, that is - are the ones who get to ask the questions during oral argument. But for a few days last week, the order was reversed when Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy visited the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He taught a class on constitutional law, huddled with faculty, and engaged in an hour-long conversation with law school dean Michael A. Fitts before about 100 faculty, students, and lawyers.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dean of Pennsylvania State University's Dickinson School of Law has announced he will step down effective July 31 to take a position at Peking University, Penn State said Thursday. Philip J. McConnaughay, who also was founding dean of Penn State's School of International Affairs, will become dean of Peking's School of Transnational law in Shenzhen, China, beginning Aug. 1. McConnaughay has led the law school, now with locations at both University Park and Carlisle, since 2002.
NEWS
February 4, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the hunt for U.S. communists after World War II, John O. Honnold Jr. was one of eight University of Pennsylvania law professors who signed a statement against the proposed Subversive Activities Control Act of 1948. During the Democratic National Convention in Chicago in 1968, Mr. Honnold was a Delaware County delegate who later accused the Chicago police of reacting violently to street demonstrations there. Yet Mr. Honnold was better known for something less eye-catching but more far-reaching.
NEWS
April 3, 2009 | By Adrienne Lu INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rutgers University yesterday named a University of Pennsylvania Law School professor the next chancellor of Rutgers University-Camden. Wendell E. Pritchett, 44, was Mayor Nutter's policy director and deputy chief of staff last year before returning to Penn, where he teaches property, land use, and urban policy. He also is president of the Philadelphia Housing Development Corp. and vice chairman of the Redevelopment Authority of Philadelphia. Pritchett will start at Rutgers on June 30. As chancellor, he will be chief executive officer of Rutgers-Camden, which has an annual budget of $50 million, according to the university.
SPORTS
March 13, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen B. Burbank's voice-mail greeting at the University of Pennsylvania last weekend informed callers that the law professor was on vacation, providing the number of a Southern California beach resort to call "in case of emergency. " Then came the emergency - the San Francisco 49ers traded Terrell Owens to the Baltimore Ravens instead of to the Eagles - and everyone called. On Monday, the NFL Players Association dusted off a seldom-used article in its labor contract with the league, requesting that an impartial "special master" review the Owens situation.
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