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NEWS
March 12, 2012
The University of Pennsylvania law school on Monday officially dedicated a new courtroom at Golkin Hall that was funded by Philadelphia plaintiffs lawyers Thomas Kline and Shanin Specter, on behalf of their law firm, Kline & Specter P.C. The courtroom will be used for student education and includes the latest in courtroom technology, the law firm said. Golkin Hall, a newly constructed 40,000 square foot addition to the law school campus, itself will be officially dedicated April 5 at an event to be attended by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capping a two-year construction project, the University of Pennsylvania Law School plans to open a 40,000-square-foot building with a ceremony on April 5 attended by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. The $33.5 million project includes a 350-seat auditorium and courtroom. The building - named Golkin Hall for its lead donors, Penn graduates Perry Golkin and his wife, Donna - faces Sansom Street on Penn's West Philadelphia campus, and more closely connects the other main buildings at the law school, including Silverman Hall, its 110-year-old Georgian-style building, the university said.
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Wolfman, 87, the University of Pennsylvania Law School dean from 1970 to 1975, died of heart failure Saturday, Aug. 20, while visiting a relative in West Orange, N.J. He resided in Cambridge, Mass. Michael A. Fitts, current Penn Law dean, wrote in an appreciation on the Penn Law website: "For more than 60 years, Bernie was a highly distinguished tax academic and expert - as well as a very loyal Penn alumnus. He will be greatly missed. " Mr. Wolfman went on to be Fessenden Professor of Law at Harvard Law School from 1976 to 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2011 | By Peter Mucha and John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writers
After setting the table for Sheryl Crow in 2009 and having to endure the ignominy of opening for the Goo Goo Dolls last year, Philadelphia and Late Night With Jimmy Fallon band the Roots will finally get to headline its hometown July 4 celebration! Mayor Nutter announced the bill Tuesday morn for the free concert on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at the Art Museum. Along with the Roots, the lineup includes classic R&Bers Earth Wind & Fire , singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles , blue-eyed Doobie Brother Michael McDonald , British hip-hop soul singer Estelle , and, on the wheels of steel, Philadelphia's DJ Jazzy Jeff . Aaron Neville , whose Joe Henry -produced gospel album I Know I've Been Changed was one of the overlooked treasures of last year, and Philadelphia bass man Gerald Veasley will play Penn's Landing during the Taste of Philadelphia festival, which runs June 24-26.
NEWS
February 4, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the hunt for U.S. communists after World War II, John O. Honnold Jr. was one of eight University of Pennsylvania law professors who signed a statement against the proposed Subversive Activities Control Act of 1948. During the Democratic National Convention in Chicago in 1968, Mr. Honnold was a Delaware County delegate who later accused the Chicago police of reacting violently to street demonstrations there. Yet Mr. Honnold was better known for something less eye-catching but more far-reaching.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Finished with a 30-year career in the Senate, Arlen Specter will take his talents to the University of Pennsylvania's law school, Penn announced Tuesday. As an adjunct faculty member, Specter will teach an upper-level course on the relationship between Congress and the Supreme Court, beginning in fall 2011, Penn officials said. "It's a subject matter which could use a lot more understanding. And it's a subject which warrants additional study. Penn Law is a good place to do it," Specter, 80, said in an interview.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2010 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Evan Kohlmann had just settled into his seat on his first day of law school at the University of Pennsylvania on Sept. 11, 2001, when he was overcome with a sense of foreboding. Law school was going to be boring. The course that day was civil procedure, an arcane body of law laying out rules for courts hearing civil lawsuits. Very important stuff in the legal world, to be sure, but the start of the class only confirmed Kohlmann's sense, building for weeks, that legal studies really didn't interest him and that he had made a terrible mistake.
NEWS
April 3, 2009 | By Adrienne Lu INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rutgers University yesterday named a University of Pennsylvania Law School professor the next chancellor of Rutgers University-Camden. Wendell E. Pritchett, 44, was Mayor Nutter's policy director and deputy chief of staff last year before returning to Penn, where he teaches property, land use, and urban policy. He also is president of the Philadelphia Housing Development Corp. and vice chairman of the Redevelopment Authority of Philadelphia. Pritchett will start at Rutgers on June 30. As chancellor, he will be chief executive officer of Rutgers-Camden, which has an annual budget of $50 million, according to the university.
NEWS
March 7, 2006 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a number of academic leaders, University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann strongly opposed being required to allow military recruiting on Penn's campus or lose federal funding. In September, she said the Pentagon's " 'take it or leave it' attitude" threatened "fundamental First Amendment protections and core values of academia. " So yesterday's 8-0 Supreme Court ruling in the military's favor puts Gutmann and her counterparts in a real bind: Compromise their "core values," by associating their institutions with the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy toward gays in its ranks or forgo billions of dollars in federal funds, about $600 million for Penn alone.
SPORTS
March 13, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen B. Burbank's voice-mail greeting at the University of Pennsylvania last weekend informed callers that the law professor was on vacation, providing the number of a Southern California beach resort to call "in case of emergency. " Then came the emergency - the San Francisco 49ers traded Terrell Owens to the Baltimore Ravens instead of to the Eagles - and everyone called. On Monday, the NFL Players Association dusted off a seldom-used article in its labor contract with the league, requesting that an impartial "special master" review the Owens situation.
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