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NEWS
March 10, 1995 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A prominent University of Pennsylvania Law School professor has agreed to join the Harvard faculty, but it isn't Lani Guinier. At least, not this year. "I talked to her this morning and she said she is not going anywhere yet," Penn spokeswoman Barbara Beck said yesterday, referring to a report in the Boston Globe that Guinier would move to Harvard in September. "She is still on sabbatical and she plans to be here in the fall to resume teaching. " The professor who is leaving Penn for Harvard is Elizabeth Warren, who teaches commercial law. Guinier, 45, gained national attention in 1993 when President Clinton nominated her to be assistant attorney general for civil rights, then withdrew that nomination five weeks later because of her controversial views.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | By Lily Eng, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every once in a while, the University of Pennsylvania Law School's student newspaper, a stolid monthly tabloid, takes a stab at satire. Last week, it tried again, with a spoof aimed at a respected associate dean. Nobody laughed. Instead, the brief article - an off-color, fictionalized list of the "Top Ten Things Students Missed Seeing Associate Dean Heidi Hurd Do at the Faculty X-Mas Party" - sent the law school into high dudgeon. Nearly two dozen professors, including Dean Colin Diver, called on all 22 members of the paper's staff to either resign or publicly disavow the "insulting and sexist" piece.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jefferson B. Fordham, 88, an educator who was dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School from 1952 until 1970 and a leader in the struggle for racial equality, died Friday in Salt Lake City. A. Leo Levin, a professor emeritus at the law school, said Dr. Fordham "was absolutely a leading force in building the Penn Law School up to great heights. " A six-footer with sparkling blue eyes and enormous energy, Dr. Fordham was called on by everyone from the President to Penn law students for advice.
LIVING
December 2, 1993 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six months ago it looked as if "Loony Lani" Guinier, the "Quota Queen," was about to exit the national stage in disgrace. Her old pal Bill Clinton had decided her views on race and voting rights were just too controversial for his administration. On June 3, five weeks after nominating Guinier to be assistant attorney general for civil rights, he yanked her nomination. That was her cue to disappear quietly, the way Zoe Baird and Kimba Wood had done before her. But Lani Guinier hasn't disappeared.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lani Guinier came here last night to set the record straight. The former Clinton Justice Department nominee, who was derided for several weeks in the spring as a "race-obsessed" radical, anti-democratic "Loony Lani" and the "Quota Queen," said she was none of those things. Instead, Guinier told a receptive audience on the Widener University campus, she was smeared and her ideas were vilified because she was doing something politically and socially unthinkable in America - talking frankly about race and justice and ways to empower minority voters.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in April 1968 was a turning point for Colin Diver, a young, idealistic student who was just finishing his final year at Harvard Law School. Ranked near the top of his class of 550, Diver had accepted a lucrative job offer from a prestigious Washington law firm. But in the aftermath of Dr. King's death, he decided to take a lower-paying job as an aide to Boston Mayor Kevin White, who would give him an opportunity to work on some of urban America's most pressing social problems.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Law students at the University of Pennsylvania will be required to perform at least 70 hours of unpaid public service under a plan approved yesterday by the Penn Law faculty. The new graduation requirement, which will take effect with the entering class this fall, is the first of its kind at a major law school, according to Penn officials. "With the new pro bono program, we hope to foster the habit of public service as part of the professional life and responsibility of the lawyer by building it into the students' law school experience," said Robert H. Mundheim, Penn Law dean.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania yesterday named Colin S. Diver, dean of the Boston University School of Law, to head its 750-student law school, one of the oldest and most prestigious in the nation. Diver's family was one of three profiled in J. Anthony Lukas' award-winning 1985 book, Common Ground, a social history of Boston school desegregation. Diver said he expects to assume the dean's post at Penn by Sept. 1. "I know the school well and I realize it is poised to really make a dramatic move in legal education," said Diver, 45, who was a visiting law professor at Penn five years ago. "I just see this as a glittering opportunity.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The story you are reading will be carefully cut out by Raymond F. Trent. He will put it in a file, perhaps next to a bibliography of articles on Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall or an audio tape of musician Hugh Masakela or a dissertation on black lawyers in Chicago. Its inclusion will be carefully penned into a blue notebook, of which there are many. And there it will rest, with thousands of other items, either in his Lindenwold apartment or in cramped quarters at the University of Pennsylvania's Biddle Law Library.
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert H. Mundheim, dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, will leave the school's top administrative post to return to full-time teaching at the law school next year. In a Dec. 11 letter to Penn President Sheldon Hackney, Mundheim, who has been dean since 1982, said there were "strong personal reasons" for his decision not to seek another term as dean when his seven-year term expires in February. "More importantly," he added, "I think the time is ripe to find new leadership which will be able to consolidate and extend the significant strides the law school has made in reasserting a leadership role in legal education.
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