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SPORTS
March 13, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stephen B. Burbank's voice-mail greeting at the University of Pennsylvania last weekend informed callers that the law professor was on vacation, providing the number of a Southern California beach resort to call "in case of emergency. " Then came the emergency - the San Francisco 49ers traded Terrell Owens to the Baltimore Ravens instead of to the Eagles - and everyone called. On Monday, the NFL Players Association dusted off a seldom-used article in its labor contract with the league, requesting that an impartial "special master" review the Owens situation.
NEWS
May 23, 1997 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk about overnight success. Two University of Pennsylvania law school students, Bruce Bellingham, 45, and Jeffrey Powell, 24, hit pay dirt when a jury awarded their client nearly $1 million in a federal age-discrimination lawsuit this week. The verdict came a day after graduation ceremonies at Penn. The duo graduated on Sunday; the verdict was read at 4 p.m. Monday. "You couldn't get better legal experience than this," said Bellingham, a sociology professor at Florida State University, who is embarking on a second career as a lawyer.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | By LINDA CHAVEZ
Women, on average, make mediocre law school students. That's a fair summary of the findings from a new study of law students at the University of Pennsylvania. According to the study, women participate less in class than men, receive lower grades and fewer honors, and rate their school experience more negatively. The chief author, Penn law professor Lani Guinier, has impeccable liberal and feminist credentials. Guinier, a former Yale Law School classmate of President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, first gained national recognition when the President tapped her to be his chief civil rights attorney in 1993 but withdrew her nomination when critics assailed her views on voting-rights issues as too radical and left-wing.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A prominent University of Pennsylvania Law School professor has agreed to join the Harvard faculty, but it isn't Lani Guinier. At least, not this year. "I talked to her this morning and she said she is not going anywhere yet," Penn spokeswoman Barbara Beck said yesterday, referring to a report in the Boston Globe that Guinier would move to Harvard in September. "She is still on sabbatical and she plans to be here in the fall to resume teaching. " The professor who is leaving Penn for Harvard is Elizabeth Warren, who teaches commercial law. Guinier, 45, gained national attention in 1993 when President Clinton nominated her to be assistant attorney general for civil rights, then withdrew that nomination five weeks later because of her controversial views.
NEWS
February 23, 1995 | By Lily Eng, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every once in a while, the University of Pennsylvania Law School's student newspaper, a stolid monthly tabloid, takes a stab at satire. Last week, it tried again, with a spoof aimed at a respected associate dean. Nobody laughed. Instead, the brief article - an off-color, fictionalized list of the "Top Ten Things Students Missed Seeing Associate Dean Heidi Hurd Do at the Faculty X-Mas Party" - sent the law school into high dudgeon. Nearly two dozen professors, including Dean Colin Diver, called on all 22 members of the paper's staff to either resign or publicly disavow the "insulting and sexist" piece.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jefferson B. Fordham, 88, an educator who was dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School from 1952 until 1970 and a leader in the struggle for racial equality, died Friday in Salt Lake City. A. Leo Levin, a professor emeritus at the law school, said Dr. Fordham "was absolutely a leading force in building the Penn Law School up to great heights. " A six-footer with sparkling blue eyes and enormous energy, Dr. Fordham was called on by everyone from the President to Penn law students for advice.
LIVING
December 2, 1993 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Six months ago it looked as if "Loony Lani" Guinier, the "Quota Queen," was about to exit the national stage in disgrace. Her old pal Bill Clinton had decided her views on race and voting rights were just too controversial for his administration. On June 3, five weeks after nominating Guinier to be assistant attorney general for civil rights, he yanked her nomination. That was her cue to disappear quietly, the way Zoe Baird and Kimba Wood had done before her. But Lani Guinier hasn't disappeared.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lani Guinier came here last night to set the record straight. The former Clinton Justice Department nominee, who was derided for several weeks in the spring as a "race-obsessed" radical, anti-democratic "Loony Lani" and the "Quota Queen," said she was none of those things. Instead, Guinier told a receptive audience on the Widener University campus, she was smeared and her ideas were vilified because she was doing something politically and socially unthinkable in America - talking frankly about race and justice and ways to empower minority voters.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in April 1968 was a turning point for Colin Diver, a young, idealistic student who was just finishing his final year at Harvard Law School. Ranked near the top of his class of 550, Diver had accepted a lucrative job offer from a prestigious Washington law firm. But in the aftermath of Dr. King's death, he decided to take a lower-paying job as an aide to Boston Mayor Kevin White, who would give him an opportunity to work on some of urban America's most pressing social problems.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Law students at the University of Pennsylvania will be required to perform at least 70 hours of unpaid public service under a plan approved yesterday by the Penn Law faculty. The new graduation requirement, which will take effect with the entering class this fall, is the first of its kind at a major law school, according to Penn officials. "With the new pro bono program, we hope to foster the habit of public service as part of the professional life and responsibility of the lawyer by building it into the students' law school experience," said Robert H. Mundheim, Penn Law dean.
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