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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
It's all about Africa on Saturday as the Penn Museum hosts it annual Celebration of African Cultures, honoring the traditions of the continent and its diaspora. Take a folk and modern-dance workshop with Anssumane Sillá, formerly of the National Ballet of Guinea Bissau, or a Tunisian and Moroccan belly-dance workshop with Habiba. Odunde 365, which extends the annual Odunde Festival's cultural outreach year-round, will operate a craft station. You can take an African proverbs family-gallery tour and hear "Stories From the Motherland: An Interactive Storytelling Celebration" with Queen Nur and Yomi Jojolo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Take a cultural trip Sunday at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's 18th annual Peace Around the World holiday celebration. From 1 to 4 p.m. guests will receive a passport enabling them to explore cultures via speakers from Kenya, Pakistan, Cameroon, Brazil, India, and the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. Middle Eastern percussionist Joe Tayoun will lead an instructional drum circle at 1:30. At 2, guests can enjoy an Indian dance performance by Nrutika Sankar, Leena Chakraborty, Sonal Makwana, and children from the Bhartiya Vidalaya Cultural Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Gallop down to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on Saturday to celebrate the Chinese New Year, the Year of the Horse, as part of World Culture Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Festivities will include performances by dance troupe MeiMei, an East vs. West Chinese music demonstration, the Pennsylvania Chinese Dance Club, the cappella group PennYo, and more. A drop-in calligraphy class will be offered from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and a language class from 12:30 to 2. Arts and crafts will be featured, including Year of the Horse crafts, painting, and paper cutting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Observe International Peace Day on Sunday with poetry, music, and art at Penn Museum's "Footprints of Peace. " Special guests will be poet and peace activist Sonia Sanchez and Philadelphia youth poet laureate Soledad Alfaro-Allah. Sanchez and Alfaro-Allah will share their poetic words of peace, and the artwork of more than 100 children from the Artistic and Cultural Enrichment summer program in West Philadelphia will be showcased. Other performers include poet Black Ice; actor and storyteller Vinie Burrows; poet and actor Jessica Care Moore; singer Lady Alma; vocalist and interdisciplinary artist Imani Uzuri; and actor T.C. Carson, who portrayed Kyle Barker on the sitcom Living Single . The event is part of Peace Day Philly 2014.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Jewelry lovers might want to make time this weekend to visit the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. As part of the 127-year-old museum's fund-raising efforts, it's hosting "Treasures," a four-day baublefest starting Thursday that features a private reception, talks with jewelry historians, and fall fashion advice from local stylists. In addition, 26 jewelry designers will be selling handmade, one-of-a-kind accessories to shoppers with a sweet spot for frippery.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
For those worried about an apocalypse supposedly predicted by the Maya calendar and coming at the end of the year 2012, there's very good news at a spectacular exhibition that opens in the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology this weekend. That notion of the world's end is firmly debunked in "Maya 2012: Lords of Time. " So those stressed about what might happen come late December can exhale, thanks to the scholars involved in this fascinating study of the Maya culture - and their calendar.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beer experts - among them the author of the new book Uncorking the Past - will bring ancient ales to life Thursday at the Penn Museum, with a lively discussion accompanied by ample quaffing. "If people want to taste the oldest chemically attested alcoholic beverage in the world, 'Chateau Jiahu' from 7000 B.C. China, this may well be one of their few chances," said Patrick McGovern, biomolecular archaeologist at the museum and a leading authority on ancient fermented beverages. He will be joined by Sam Calagione, founder and president of Dogfish Head Brewery in Rehoboth Beach, Del., maker of Chateau Jiahu, which won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival last week in Denver.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Kathy Matheson, Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - The Penn Museum will indefinitely lend ancient jewelry known as "Troy gold" to Turkey in exchange for a future exhibition of King Midas artifacts, officials announced Tuesday. The deal is part of what Penn Museum officials call a landmark agreement to work more collaboratively with Turkey's Ministry of Culture and Tourism. The Penn Museum acquired the early Bronze Age jewelry in 1966. But it wasn't until 2009 that scholars identified the items as likely being from the historic city of Troy.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gillian Wakely, 67, of Center City, the longtime head of education programming at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Wednesday, Aug. 14, of colon cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Wakely worked at the museum for 40 years, most of which she spent as head of its education department. She managed nearly 80 volunteer guides. A native of London, Ms. Wakely grew up viewing collections at the British Museum. When she moved to Philadelphia at 26 and visited the Penn museum for the first time, she was immediately captivated by the collections, she wrote in a letter published in the museum's magazine.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
When the Berlin-Baghdad railway was under construction in the 1890s, German engineers spotted massive mounds in the remote waste southwest of Ankara. Two classicists excavated the largest of the mounds in 1900 and concluded they were digging at Gordion, the ancient capital of the Phrygian kingdom, ruled millennia ago by legendary King Midas. But at the end of the summer they packed up and left. Gordion sat untouched for 50 more years, until archaeologists from the Penn Museum launched what has been an astonishing ongoing exploration of one of the most fruitful sites of antiquity.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
The outdoor Summer Nights Concert Series at the Penn Museum continues Wednesday with this Philly Afro-Cuban/West African drum, music, and dance ensemble, combining modern folk and jazz with traditional Yoruba call-and-response songs.
NEWS
July 18, 2016
Amanda X . Kensington-born rock trio fronted by guitarist Cat Park and bassist Kat Bean, whose follow-up to their 2014 Siltbreeze Records debut, Amnesia, is starting to seem long-awaited. With Winter Break, Shelf Life, and Yankee Bluff. Monday at PhilaMOCA. Zydeco-A-Go-Go. Le bon-tons will be rolling at the fais do-do with this Philadelphia Cajun- and Creole-spiced dance band. Wednesday at the Summer Night concert series at the Penn Museum. Freakwater. Carter Family-friendly Louisville, Ky., duo of Catherine Irwin and Janet Beveridge Bean, who were way ahead of the Americana gothic alt-country curve with their 1989 self-titled debut, and who are at the top of their game with the new Scheherazade . Wednesday at Sellersville Theater.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
Beginning Monday, Philadelphia will become the center of the Sumerian universe when nearly 300 Assyriologists descend on the Penn Museum for four days of hobnobbing, scholarly presentations, receptions, and Sumerian scuttlebutt. The Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania will be hosting the 62nd Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale, the worldwide association of scholarly Mesopotamian enthusiasts, and a very big deal indeed. It is only the fifth time since its 1950 founding that the organization has held its annual gathering in the United States, and the second time it has been to Penn.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Tom Hines
One of the first things visitors encounter in "Look Again: Contemporary Perspectives on African Art," the centerpiece exhibition of the five-show " Creative Africa " event at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, is a diviner's kit. The kit, from the Ovimbundu culture of Angola, consists of an array of seemingly miscellaneous objects, including some tiny figurines, a colored crystalline rock, and a number of more enigmatic items. The diviner carried them in a basket, and when someone sought his advice or predictions, he tossed them out. His skill was in looking at how they landed and interpreting the position and juxtaposition of the objects in a way that was useful to those who sought his services.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
'Tonight, we commune with the dead," declared the intermission lecturer, Philip Jones, a Babylonian specialist. Is that so different from many classical music concerts? This occasion was different. It was called "Ancient Echoes," a special concert at the Penn Museum's Chinese Rotunda on Tuesday, surrounded by Tang Dynasty sculptures. Egyptian sarcophagi lay in the next room. The event was special, indeed. The rotunda is a 90-foot-high dome: Acoustic spaces this diffuse and reverberant are so tough on preexisting repertoire that two new pieces were written for the space.
NEWS
April 24, 2016
Face(book)ing the Music. The San Francisco Symphony says it will become the first major symphony orchestra to stream on Facebook Live on Wednesday, when it performs the world premiere of Mason Bates' Auditorium. Pablo Heras-Casado conducts, with Bates performing on electronica - the piece samples the sounds of baroque instruments - at Davies Symphony Hall on Wednesday at 8:15 p.m. California (11:15 p.m. East Coast) time. Information: www.facebook.com/sfsymphony . And while you're Facebooking your way around the classics, search for Kanye and Beethoven to hear the mashup created with the Los Angeles Young Musicians Foundation that comingles Kanye with the traditional symphony orchestra in a strangely compelling way. - Peter Dobrin Ancient Echoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016
Friday-Sunday Changing spaces A trio of installation artists - ceramicist Matthew Courtney , paper sculptor Sun Young Kang , and painter Zahra Nazari - have created large-scale works for the show Transformations , ending this weekend at the Main Line Art Center, 746 Panmure Rd., Haverford. Times: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday. Admission is free. Information: 610-525-0272 or www.mainlineart.org Friday Short subjects The invaluable Secret Cinema presents Movies for Every Occasion: The Best and Worst of Castle and Official Films, a selection of nine-minute reels made to be sold to projector owners for home showings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016
Repertory Films Bryn Mawr Film Institute 824 W. Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-527-9898. www.brynmawrfilm.org . The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984) $5; $4 children. 3/12. 11 am. Pather Panchali (India, 1955) $12; $9 seniors; $8 students and children. 3/15. 7:15 pm. El Velador (Mexico, 2011) $12; $9 seniors; $8 students and children. 3/16. 7 pm. Colonial Theatre 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-1228. www.thecolonialtheatre.com . Bicycle Thieves (Italy, 1948)
NEWS
February 21, 2016
Penn Museum celebrated the world-exclusive premiere of its "The Golden Age of King Midas" exhibition on Feb. 6 with a gala attended by more than 300 guests who enjoyed a cocktail reception, exhibition preview, and dinner fit for a king. The exhibition features 150 objects, including more than 120 ancient artifacts on loan from four museums in Turkey. Among the speakers were Julian Siggers, Williams director of the Penn Museum; Ertan Yalcin, consul general at the Turkish Consulate in New York; honoree Charles K. Williams II; and Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, CULTURE WRITER
When the Berlin-Baghdad railway was under construction in the 1890s, German engineers spotted massive mounds in the remote waste southwest of Ankara. Two classicists excavated the largest of the mounds in 1900 and concluded they were digging at Gordion, the ancient capital of the Phrygian kingdom, ruled millennia ago by legendary King Midas. But at the end of the summer they packed up and left. Gordion sat untouched for 50 more years, until archaeologists from the Penn Museum launched what has been an astonishing ongoing exploration of one of the most fruitful sites of antiquity.
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