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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
It's all about Africa on Saturday as the Penn Museum hosts it annual Celebration of African Cultures, honoring the traditions of the continent and its diaspora. Take a folk and modern-dance workshop with Anssumane Sillá, formerly of the National Ballet of Guinea Bissau, or a Tunisian and Moroccan belly-dance workshop with Habiba. Odunde 365, which extends the annual Odunde Festival's cultural outreach year-round, will operate a craft station. You can take an African proverbs family-gallery tour and hear "Stories From the Motherland: An Interactive Storytelling Celebration" with Queen Nur and Yomi Jojolo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Take a cultural trip Sunday at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's 18th annual Peace Around the World holiday celebration. From 1 to 4 p.m. guests will receive a passport enabling them to explore cultures via speakers from Kenya, Pakistan, Cameroon, Brazil, India, and the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. Middle Eastern percussionist Joe Tayoun will lead an instructional drum circle at 1:30. At 2, guests can enjoy an Indian dance performance by Nrutika Sankar, Leena Chakraborty, Sonal Makwana, and children from the Bhartiya Vidalaya Cultural Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Gallop down to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on Saturday to celebrate the Chinese New Year, the Year of the Horse, as part of World Culture Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Festivities will include performances by dance troupe MeiMei, an East vs. West Chinese music demonstration, the Pennsylvania Chinese Dance Club, the cappella group PennYo, and more. A drop-in calligraphy class will be offered from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and a language class from 12:30 to 2. Arts and crafts will be featured, including Year of the Horse crafts, painting, and paper cutting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Observe International Peace Day on Sunday with poetry, music, and art at Penn Museum's "Footprints of Peace. " Special guests will be poet and peace activist Sonia Sanchez and Philadelphia youth poet laureate Soledad Alfaro-Allah. Sanchez and Alfaro-Allah will share their poetic words of peace, and the artwork of more than 100 children from the Artistic and Cultural Enrichment summer program in West Philadelphia will be showcased. Other performers include poet Black Ice; actor and storyteller Vinie Burrows; poet and actor Jessica Care Moore; singer Lady Alma; vocalist and interdisciplinary artist Imani Uzuri; and actor T.C. Carson, who portrayed Kyle Barker on the sitcom Living Single . The event is part of Peace Day Philly 2014.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Jewelry lovers might want to make time this weekend to visit the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. As part of the 127-year-old museum's fund-raising efforts, it's hosting "Treasures," a four-day baublefest starting Thursday that features a private reception, talks with jewelry historians, and fall fashion advice from local stylists. In addition, 26 jewelry designers will be selling handmade, one-of-a-kind accessories to shoppers with a sweet spot for frippery.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
For those worried about an apocalypse supposedly predicted by the Maya calendar and coming at the end of the year 2012, there's very good news at a spectacular exhibition that opens in the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology this weekend. That notion of the world's end is firmly debunked in "Maya 2012: Lords of Time. " So those stressed about what might happen come late December can exhale, thanks to the scholars involved in this fascinating study of the Maya culture - and their calendar.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Beer experts - among them the author of the new book Uncorking the Past - will bring ancient ales to life Thursday at the Penn Museum, with a lively discussion accompanied by ample quaffing. "If people want to taste the oldest chemically attested alcoholic beverage in the world, 'Chateau Jiahu' from 7000 B.C. China, this may well be one of their few chances," said Patrick McGovern, biomolecular archaeologist at the museum and a leading authority on ancient fermented beverages. He will be joined by Sam Calagione, founder and president of Dogfish Head Brewery in Rehoboth Beach, Del., maker of Chateau Jiahu, which won a gold medal at the Great American Beer Festival last week in Denver.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Kathy Matheson, Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - The Penn Museum will indefinitely lend ancient jewelry known as "Troy gold" to Turkey in exchange for a future exhibition of King Midas artifacts, officials announced Tuesday. The deal is part of what Penn Museum officials call a landmark agreement to work more collaboratively with Turkey's Ministry of Culture and Tourism. The Penn Museum acquired the early Bronze Age jewelry in 1966. But it wasn't until 2009 that scholars identified the items as likely being from the historic city of Troy.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gillian Wakely, 67, of Center City, the longtime head of education programming at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Wednesday, Aug. 14, of colon cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Wakely worked at the museum for 40 years, most of which she spent as head of its education department. She managed nearly 80 volunteer guides. A native of London, Ms. Wakely grew up viewing collections at the British Museum. When she moved to Philadelphia at 26 and visited the Penn museum for the first time, she was immediately captivated by the collections, she wrote in a letter published in the museum's magazine.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
No tiptoeing Saturday-evening spiders had disturbed the dominoes, no rumbling trucks passing in the dark. "Nothing overnight," Steve Perrucci said. "The mice were kind, the spiders. " But early Sunday afternoon, a 2-year-old boy dropped a ball no bigger than a cough drop and knocked over a short line of Perrucci's dominoes. Quickly repaired, the line was made upright. And so at 3 p.m. Sunday, about 100 folks clustered around a maze of, yes, 10,000 dominoes on the third-floor rotunda of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each spring, Philadelphia's tech start-up founders and promoters come blinking into the light, renting halls, and putting on shows in search of investors, clients, new hires, and public attention for it all. This town, for all its history of innovations (such as the first modern computer, ENIAC), has not grown into a world tech center like Palo Alto or Cambridge. Rather, it's a city "where technology gets commercialized," where medical and engineering scholars solve problems for software, telecom, drug, and investment companies, says Fairmount Partners investment banker Allen Born.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
It would be hard for any real-life archaeologist to match the fictional Indiana Jones, but Julian Siggers gives it a good run. Siggers, 50, director of the Penn Museum since July 2012, may not crack a bullwhip or sport a battered fedora, but he does have a fondness for motorcycles and tattoos. He's also handsome, charming, and possessed of an impressive academic pedigree, including a doctorate from the University of Toronto in Near Eastern prehistoric archaeology. Born in England and educated at University College London, he came to Penn from the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where he was vice president for programs, education, and content communication.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
GINGER-mopped comedian Ellie Kemper , one of the cutest new sitcom stars, will be coming to the University of Pennsylvania later this month. Kemper, a Kansas City, Mo., native, plays the eponymous Kimmy Schmidt in Tina Fey and Robert Carlock 's "The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" on Netflix. She'll be gracing our fair city with a talk organized by Penn's Social, Planning and Events Committee. Perhaps best known for her role as the adorable and endearing receptionist in "The Office," Kemper brings that same charm in depicting the innocent and trusting Kimmy, who escapes from an underground doomsday cult in Indiana and ventures out to start life over in New York City.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia-based organizations received a total of nearly $1.4 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the NEH announced Monday. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts received $300,000 to develop an exhibition, publication, and programs exploring the relationship between World War I and American art. The grant was made through a special endowment program called Standing Together, designed to support projects that explore war and its aftermath, promote discussion of the experience of military service, and support returning veterans and their families, the endowment said.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talon Bazille Ducheneaux, 22, sits in a conference room at the University of Pennsylvania's Greenfield Intercultural Center. Born and raised in South Dakota, he identifies as Lakota and Dakota. He remembers that, in his boyhood classrooms, "they start indigenous history at 1492. " But Ducheneaux is writing his full history, in rap. On Saturday, the Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (which, fittingly enough, was built on Lenape land) will present "Modern Native Voices: The Medium of Hip Hop New Music with a Distinctly Native Beat.
NEWS
March 16, 2015
A Conversation with Pussy Riot. Nadya Tolokonnikova and Masha Alekhina of the Russian protest band Pussy Riot come to the University of Pennsylvania to screen the video for "I Can't Breathe," their Eric Garner-inspired single, and lead a discussion. Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. at the Penn Museum. Free. Kim Gordon, "Girl in a Band" (Dey Street, $27.99). Sonic Youth bassist dishes on the dissolution of her marriage to bandmate Thurston Moore, disses Lana Del Rey and Courtney Love, and tells her story, from growing up in Southern California to becoming a downtown Manhattan paragon of arty cool.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2015 | The Inquirer Staff
Pussy Riot at Penn! Next Tuesday, from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Penn Museum's Harrison Auditorium, 3260 South St., two members of the Russian band  Pussy Riot , cofounders  Nadya Tolokkonnikova  and  Masha Alyokhina , will be on hand for "A Conversation with Pussy Riot. " They'll screen their film  I Can't Breathe , followed by a discussion. Free. 'Got to Give It Up,' indeed A lot of people think "Blurred Lines," the 2013 smash hit for Pharrell Williams , Robin Thicke , and rapper T.I. , sounds like Marvin Gaye 's 1977 hit "Got to Give It Up. " Gaye's family did, which is why they sued for $25 million.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ghost hunters and the Ivy League professors were 40 minutes into their investigation at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology when Projit B. Mukharji felt something. The rest of the group had fanned out across the darkened Harrison Auditorium, a spacious art deco room with a coffered dome. The paranormal sleuths were training their temperature guns and "electromagnetic frequency meters" - tools that, in theory, register changes should a spirit be present.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
It's all about Africa on Saturday as the Penn Museum hosts it annual Celebration of African Cultures, honoring the traditions of the continent and its diaspora. Take a folk and modern-dance workshop with Anssumane Sillá, formerly of the National Ballet of Guinea Bissau, or a Tunisian and Moroccan belly-dance workshop with Habiba. Odunde 365, which extends the annual Odunde Festival's cultural outreach year-round, will operate a craft station. You can take an African proverbs family-gallery tour and hear "Stories From the Motherland: An Interactive Storytelling Celebration" with Queen Nur and Yomi Jojolo.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dave Schwartz was a boy, his father was constantly in the hospital, and his mother would drop him at the Penn Museum while she visited her husband. Beginning in 1961, when he was 8, Schwartz spent years among the mummies, the giant sphinx, and other antiquities. "I'm kind of a museum orphan," he says now, at age 61. "I literally grew up in that museum. " One day, he was tracing hieroglyphs on a 10-foot-tall Mayan limestone monument - his sketches spread all over the floor of the Mesoamerican Gallery - when an older man in a suit stopped and asked the boy what he was doing.
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