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Penn Museum

NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
GILLIAN WAKELY grew up in England, where her parents' idea of a fun time was to visit a museum. When she arrived in America, she came upon a photograph in an art-history book of the "Ram in a Thicket. " The anthropologically hip know of it as an exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It's the statue of a ram (more likely a goat) dug up in 1928 in the Royal Tombs of Ur in southern Iraq. Gillian knew about the 4,000-year-old figure because it was one of two found in Ur. The other was in the British Museum in London.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's all about the story. Each item in the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology - each statue, pitcher, mummy, mosaic, and sphinx - comes with one. The story of how it got here - "you won't find a museum comparable to it anywhere," in the words of new director Julian Siggers. The story of how it was found. "Much of the time, you're digging in the wrong place," says C. Brian Rose, curator of the Mediterranean section and a man who has done his share of digging. "When you find the right place, it's exciting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2011 | By Kathryn Canavan, For The Inquirer
Walk through one door at the Penn Museum this weekend and you'll feel as if you've strolled into a before-and-after advertisement. Near the door is the museum's African exhibit - a cluster of tall glass cases filled when W. Wilson Goode was Philadelphia's mayor. About 350 artifacts are on display - a driblet of the museum's stash of 42,000 Egyptian objects and 20,000 objects from elsewhere in Africa. On the other side of the wall is the new "Imagine Africa" exhibit, stuffed into a corridor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2012 | Choose one .
Fine Arts Maya 2012: Lords of Time. The origins of intricate Maya timekeeping systems are an integral part of the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's exploration of a civilization that flourished, with cities already in existence by 500 B.C., in what is now southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, and El Salvador. At 10 a.m. Saturday, Porfirio Lobo Sosa, president of Honduras, will join Penn Museum director Richard Hodges at a ceremony to open the exhibition. — Sally Friedman Exhibition hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, through Jan. 13 at 3260 South St. Timed tickets, which include admission to the rest of the museum, are $22.50, $18.50 for ages 65 and older and military, and $16.50 for students (full-time with ID)
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Despite a major diplomatic pratfall that caused artifacts to be spirited back to their homeland two months early, the Penn Museum's Secrets of the Silk Road exhibition managed to draw 42,807 visitors during the 39 days its Chinese materials were in residence. The highly touted show, featuring two mummies and about 130 artifacts from remote desert regions of western China, was originally scheduled to open Feb. 5. But a few days before that, Chinese authorities told Penn that the show had not been approved for Philadelphia and that the artifacts had to be returned, still packed, to China.
NEWS
December 17, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faced with a worsening deficit, the venerable, research-driven University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaelogy and Anthropology is seeking to reinvent itself as an updated "tourist magnet. " As an initial step, the director has laid off 18 researchers, though some may stay if grant money can be found to cover their salaries. "We were living beyond our means," said Director Richard Hodges. He said the museum's finances are unsustainable, and that the museum must refurbish its exhibits and "get its income up. " News of the potential layoffs dismayed scholars inside the museum and out. The 120-year-old Penn museum has a worldwide reputation for its scholarship and for supporting expeditions - from the tombs of Egypt to the temples of the Mayans to the remains of Babylon, Gordion and Troy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven years ago, Tukufu Zuberi, a professor of sociology and Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania, decided to become a collector. The only question was, of what? He settled on images of the black body - specifically the black body in war - and went about acquiring a trove on his world travels. Zuberi's efforts have come together in a unique and compelling exhibition of posters portraying blacks in the military, from the Civil War through World War II and the African independence movements of the 1950s and '60s.
NEWS
April 12, 2011
Having served under three different directors as deputy director of Penn Museum, I read with interest the April 6 article on the "Silk Road" exhibit ("Penn Museum director declares its abbreviated exhibit of Chinese artifacts a success"). Director Richard Hodges called the show a "success," notwithstanding the debacle over artifacts that Beijing would only allow to be shown for four weeks, not the four months that Penn Museum trumpeted. Hodges was quoted as being pleased that, with this exhibit, Penn Museum went from being a "small cog" to a "major cog" at the university.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | N/A
Events are free unless otherwise indicated. Symposiums & Seminars Big Brothers Big Sisters Southeastern PA is hosting a few information sessions on how to become a Big Brother or Big Sister. Center City office, 123 S. Broad St., Suite 2180; 215-790-9200 or www.bbbssepa.org. 6 pm Wed•Noon Thurs•10 am Sat National Constitution Center, 525 Arch St., Independence Mall; 215-409-6700 or www. constitutioncenter.org. Reservations required. Income Tax Day, free with museum admission 9:30 am-5 pm Tues•Social Media: The New Political Battleground, 6:30 pm Thurs•One University: FDR and the Path to WWII: What We Know Now That We Didn't Know Then, Admission $89. Reservations are required at www.onedayu.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2012
Friday-Saturday Sounds of the season The Philadelphia Orchestra will celebrate the holidays with "The Glorious Sound of Christmas. " Join the orchestra for favorites at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts' Verizon Hall, 300 S. Broad St. Admission: $40-$119. Time: 7 p.m. Information: 215-893-1999, www.philorch.org .   Friday Party like there's no tomorrow Join the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology as it holds a celebration for the end of the world ... 12-21-12, according to an ancient Maya calendar.
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