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NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dave Schwartz was a boy, his father was constantly in the hospital, and his mother would drop him at the Penn Museum while she visited her husband. Beginning in 1961, when he was 8, Schwartz spent years among the mummies, the giant sphinx, and other antiquities. "I'm kind of a museum orphan," he says now, at age 61. "I literally grew up in that museum. " One day, he was tracing hieroglyphs on a 10-foot-tall Mayan limestone monument - his sketches spread all over the floor of the Mesoamerican Gallery - when an older man in a suit stopped and asked the boy what he was doing.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talon Bazille Ducheneaux, 22, sits in a conference room at the University of Pennsylvania's Greenfield Intercultural Center. Born and raised in South Dakota, he identifies as Lakota and Dakota. He remembers that, in his boyhood classrooms, "they start indigenous history at 1492. " But Ducheneaux is writing his full history, in rap. On Saturday, the Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (which, fittingly enough, was built on Lenape land) will present "Modern Native Voices: The Medium of Hip Hop New Music with a Distinctly Native Beat.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
GILLIAN WAKELY grew up in England, where her parents' idea of a fun time was to visit a museum. When she arrived in America, she came upon a photograph in an art-history book of the "Ram in a Thicket. " The anthropologically hip know of it as an exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It's the statue of a ram (more likely a goat) dug up in 1928 in the Royal Tombs of Ur in southern Iraq. Gillian knew about the 4,000-year-old figure because it was one of two found in Ur. The other was in the British Museum in London.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Gay, a mount maker at the Penn Museum, was standing in front of a display case filled with gold objects, when the sun streaked through a gallery window. "It was amazing," he said Saturday at the museum. "It was 3 in the afternoon, the shades were up in here, and the sun came through and hit that bead. It was like an intense light, an LED blazing. " Gold does that sometimes. Gay was at work helping install the museum's big 2015 exhibition, "Beneath the Surface: Life, Death, and Gold in Ancient Panama," which opens Feb. 7. He was doing what he always does, unobtrusively setting delicate artifacts into unlikely positions.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following a scientific analysis that suggested its collection of ancient, Trojan-style gold jewelry was looted from northwestern Turkey, the University of Pennsylvania announced this week that it had lent the 24 items to that country for an indefinite period. In exchange, the Turkish government pledged to lend other artifacts for a one-year exhibit at Penn's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, including priceless items from Gordion, seat of power of King Midas. The country also promised support for ongoing excavations by Penn scholars within its borders.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's all about the story. Each item in the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology - each statue, pitcher, mummy, mosaic, and sphinx - comes with one. The story of how it got here - "you won't find a museum comparable to it anywhere," in the words of new director Julian Siggers. The story of how it was found. "Much of the time, you're digging in the wrong place," says C. Brian Rose, curator of the Mediterranean section and a man who has done his share of digging. "When you find the right place, it's exciting.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
It would be hard for any real-life archaeologist to match the fictional Indiana Jones, but Julian Siggers gives it a good run. Siggers, 50, director of the Penn Museum since July 2012, may not crack a bullwhip or sport a battered fedora, but he does have a fondness for motorcycles and tattoos. He's also handsome, charming, and possessed of an impressive academic pedigree, including a doctorate from the University of Toronto in Near Eastern prehistoric archaeology. Born in England and educated at University College London, he came to Penn from the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where he was vice president for programs, education, and content communication.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2011 | By Kathryn Canavan, For The Inquirer
Walk through one door at the Penn Museum this weekend and you'll feel as if you've strolled into a before-and-after advertisement. Near the door is the museum's African exhibit - a cluster of tall glass cases filled when W. Wilson Goode was Philadelphia's mayor. About 350 artifacts are on display - a driblet of the museum's stash of 42,000 Egyptian objects and 20,000 objects from elsewhere in Africa. On the other side of the wall is the new "Imagine Africa" exhibit, stuffed into a corridor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2012 | Choose one .
Fine Arts Maya 2012: Lords of Time. The origins of intricate Maya timekeeping systems are an integral part of the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's exploration of a civilization that flourished, with cities already in existence by 500 B.C., in what is now southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, and El Salvador. At 10 a.m. Saturday, Porfirio Lobo Sosa, president of Honduras, will join Penn Museum director Richard Hodges at a ceremony to open the exhibition. — Sally Friedman Exhibition hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, through Jan. 13 at 3260 South St. Timed tickets, which include admission to the rest of the museum, are $22.50, $18.50 for ages 65 and older and military, and $16.50 for students (full-time with ID)
NEWS
December 17, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Faced with a worsening deficit, the venerable, research-driven University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaelogy and Anthropology is seeking to reinvent itself as an updated "tourist magnet. " As an initial step, the director has laid off 18 researchers, though some may stay if grant money can be found to cover their salaries. "We were living beyond our means," said Director Richard Hodges. He said the museum's finances are unsustainable, and that the museum must refurbish its exhibits and "get its income up. " News of the potential layoffs dismayed scholars inside the museum and out. The 120-year-old Penn museum has a worldwide reputation for its scholarship and for supporting expeditions - from the tombs of Egypt to the temples of the Mayans to the remains of Babylon, Gordion and Troy.
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