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NEWS
December 21, 2012
By Julian Siggers It's Dec. 21, and for some, that means it must be the end of the world. At the Penn Museum, where we've been presenting the exhibition "Maya 2012: Lords of Time" since May, talk of apocalyptic prophecy and consequent media coverage has been building steadily. We've certainly had our own fun with the "phenomenon," even going so far as to bring DJ Scribble out tonight for a final countdown dance party (no word yet on what that last song will be). "Maya 2012: Lords of Time" draws upon the Penn Museum's own extensive Maya scholarship and recent archaeological discoveries at the UNESCO World Heritage site of Copan, Honduras, to examine what the ancient Maya understood about time, the calendar, and the cycles of life.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ghost hunters and the Ivy League professors were 40 minutes into their investigation at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology when Projit B. Mukharji felt something. The rest of the group had fanned out across the darkened Harrison Auditorium, a spacious art deco room with a coffered dome. The paranormal sleuths were training their temperature guns and "electromagnetic frequency meters" - tools that, in theory, register changes should a spirit be present.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Hit the mall this weekend for a pop-up live theatrical musical, The Faraways , at Philadelphia Mills. The musical, which is on a national tour, is a 200-seat mobile pop-up theater. The show focuses on visitors to Earth, in human disguise, looking to find a home and not be forced to return to their world. Enjoy the humor, R&B and reggae music, dance, and rhythmic gymnastics as the troupe performs songs including those with local flair highlighting Philadelphia landmarks. Don't worry if you catch boogie fever: The show's format includes audience participation.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The students leaned in for a better look at their subject - a flattened skeleton, curled up and encased in a brown gunk of dirt and wax. "I've never been this up close and personal with something . . . that old," said Carly Sokach, 21, a University of Pennsylvania senior. That's 5,300 years old. The skeleton was excavated from a 50-foot pit in Iraq in 1930, packed in a crate and shipped to the Penn Museum. Not much more was known about it. For decades, the skeleton had rested in obscurity, with no paperwork to explain its provenance.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Sharer, 72, of Landenberg, an archaeologist and authority on Mayan history and culture, and an emeritus curator at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Thursday, Sept. 20, of pancreatic cancer at a hospice in Delaware. Mr. Sharer, a professor emeritus, spent 40 years as a professor of anthropology at Penn and conducted research in Central America for nearly five decades. He was the author, coauthor, editor, or coeditor of more than 20 books and monographs.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia-based organizations received a total of nearly $1.4 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the NEH announced Monday. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts received $300,000 to develop an exhibition, publication, and programs exploring the relationship between World War I and American art. The grant was made through a special endowment program called Standing Together, designed to support projects that explore war and its aftermath, promote discussion of the experience of military service, and support returning veterans and their families, the endowment said.
NEWS
November 9, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ellen Lucile Kohler, 91, a key University of Pennsylvania archaeologist who excavated the site in central Turkey where artifacts of Alexander the Great and King Midas were found, died Monday at Bryn Mawr Terrace. She was a longtime resident of University City. The Gordion archaeological project, which began in 1950, was one of Penn's most famous excavations, said Gareth Darbyshire of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. "Her death is the end of an era," he said.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several years ago, poet Sonia Sánchez had just returned from her three-mile morning walk. As she sat on her porch sipping green tea and reading the paper, she heard childish voices from the sidewalk nearby, raised in agitation. Aroused from her moment of tranquillity, she asked the schoolchildren why they were arguing and invited them onto her porch to quell their unrest. She asked them to listen to the birds singing - to feel the peace that embodied her home. "This is my house, this is my porch, but this is also my sidewalk," Sánchez told them.
NEWS
February 24, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Henry N. Michael, 93, of Ardmore, a scientist and senior fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology whose groundbreaking work in the application of tree-ring analysis revolutionized archaeological dating techniques, died Sunday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Professor Michael and his research colleagues spent years collecting samples of ancient bristlecone pine trees for a project that would alter the conventional wisdom about how to determine scientific dates.
NEWS
October 23, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gregory L. Possehl spent parts of his academic life on archaeological digs in South Asia, but he also paid attention to the West Philadelphia neighborhood of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. "One of the roles the University Museum plays is as a doorway for our neighbors to see what goes on at the University of Pennsylvania," Dr. Possehl explained in a 1985 Inquirer interview. Speaking of a Penn exhibit on the history of Buddhism meant in part to attract nonacademics, he noted: "This is an educational display that will be pretty, too, by the way. We don't mind being beautiful as long as we have our message.
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