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NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's all about the story. Each item in the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology - each statue, pitcher, mummy, mosaic, and sphinx - comes with one. The story of how it got here - "you won't find a museum comparable to it anywhere," in the words of new director Julian Siggers. The story of how it was found. "Much of the time, you're digging in the wrong place," says C. Brian Rose, curator of the Mediterranean section and a man who has done his share of digging. "When you find the right place, it's exciting.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By April Saul, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth Messaros beamed as she ran her hands over Egyptian relics thousands of years old at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The sightless teen, a student at the Overbrook School for the Blind, had a similar experience once at an art museum - but had to wear gloves. "There, we were relying on rubber!" she said. Not so at Penn, where blind and visually impaired visitors had only to wipe their hands clean in between the half-dozen artifacts featured on a "touch tour" designed by Trish Maunder, coordinator of special tours.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Sharer, 72, of Landenberg, an archaeologist and authority on Mayan history and culture, and an emeritus curator at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Thursday, Sept. 20, of pancreatic cancer at a hospice in Delaware. Mr. Sharer, a professor emeritus, spent 40 years as a professor of anthropology at Penn and conducted research in Central America for nearly five decades. He was the author, coauthor, editor, or coeditor of more than 20 books and monographs.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following a scientific analysis that suggested its collection of ancient, Trojan-style gold jewelry was looted from northwestern Turkey, the University of Pennsylvania announced this week that it had lent the 24 items to that country for an indefinite period. In exchange, the Turkish government pledged to lend other artifacts for a one-year exhibit at Penn's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, including priceless items from Gordion, seat of power of King Midas. The country also promised support for ongoing excavations by Penn scholars within its borders.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Kathy Matheson, Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - The Penn Museum will indefinitely lend ancient jewelry known as "Troy gold" to Turkey in exchange for a future exhibition of King Midas artifacts, officials announced Tuesday. The deal is part of what Penn Museum officials call a landmark agreement to work more collaboratively with Turkey's Ministry of Culture and Tourism. The Penn Museum acquired the early Bronze Age jewelry in 1966. But it wasn't until 2009 that scholars identified the items as likely being from the historic city of Troy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2012 | Laurie T. Conrad
INTERNATIONAL music in a lush garden setting — that's the plan from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Aug. 29 for the P.M. @ Penn Museum Summer Nights music series in the Stoner Courtyard at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (3260 South St., 215-898-4000, penn.museum). Concerts move inside if the weather doesn't cooperate. There's a bar and light refreshments, and museum galleries stay open till 8 p.m. Admissions vary, depending on how much you want to see. Enjoy the P.M. concert and visit the special exhibit "Maya 2012: Lords of Time" for $15.50 a person.
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
When I was in high school, students were almost entirely ignorant of the fact that the Americas were already densely populated when Columbus bumped into the island of Hispaniola in 1492. Some of these civilizations, particularly the Aztecs, the Maya, and the Inca, were as sophisticated as any pre-Columbian European cultures, in some instances more so. As it was, I and my cohorts accepted the "conquistadors-and-Indians" version of American history as right and true. Where am I going with this?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2012 | Choose one .
Fine Arts Maya 2012: Lords of Time. The origins of intricate Maya timekeeping systems are an integral part of the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's exploration of a civilization that flourished, with cities already in existence by 500 B.C., in what is now southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, and El Salvador. At 10 a.m. Saturday, Porfirio Lobo Sosa, president of Honduras, will join Penn Museum director Richard Hodges at a ceremony to open the exhibition. — Sally Friedman Exhibition hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Sunday, through Jan. 13 at 3260 South St. Timed tickets, which include admission to the rest of the museum, are $22.50, $18.50 for ages 65 and older and military, and $16.50 for students (full-time with ID)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
For those worried about an apocalypse supposedly predicted by the Maya calendar and coming at the end of the year 2012, there's very good news at a spectacular exhibition that opens in the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology this weekend. That notion of the world's end is firmly debunked in "Maya 2012: Lords of Time. " So those stressed about what might happen come late December can exhale, thanks to the scholars involved in this fascinating study of the Maya culture - and their calendar.
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