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Penn Museum

NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
DON'T look now, but that tilapia you're tucking into has been around since King Tut. In the fascinating new book Culinary Expeditions: A Celebration of Food and Culture , published by the Women's Committee to benefit the Penn Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, tilapia is revealed for what it once was: Nile perch, a symbol of power and fertility to the ancient Egyptians. Likely the earliest farmed fish, tilapia was raised in shallow ponds along the banks of the Nile, and Egypt remains the second largest producer of tilapia in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Ancient Egypt doesn't seem so far away when you're pretending to row down the Nile, following the adventures of a cheery crocodile and his best friend. Works by Renoir and Cezanne are much less intimidating if you wear pajamas and carry a stuffed bear when you're first introduced to them. Those seemingly giant suits of armor aren't so scary when you can touch them and then make your own metal designs. Many of the area's cultural institutions are making sure they're kid-friendly, offering a variety of family programs ranging from storytelling and movie watching to hands-on craft projects in the shadow of some of the world's greatest artworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Gallop down to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology on Saturday to celebrate the Chinese New Year, the Year of the Horse, as part of World Culture Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Festivities will include performances by dance troupe MeiMei, an East vs. West Chinese music demonstration, the Pennsylvania Chinese Dance Club, the cappella group PennYo, and more. A drop-in calligraphy class will be offered from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and a language class from 12:30 to 2. Arts and crafts will be featured, including Year of the Horse crafts, painting, and paper cutting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Take a cultural trip Sunday at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology's 18th annual Peace Around the World holiday celebration. From 1 to 4 p.m. guests will receive a passport enabling them to explore cultures via speakers from Kenya, Pakistan, Cameroon, Brazil, India, and the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. Middle Eastern percussionist Joe Tayoun will lead an instructional drum circle at 1:30. At 2, guests can enjoy an Indian dance performance by Nrutika Sankar, Leena Chakraborty, Sonal Makwana, and children from the Bhartiya Vidalaya Cultural Center.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the University of Pennsylvania's 15-ton stone sphinx was brought to Philadelphia from the ruins of the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis, its much-anticipated delivery was delayed by, among other things, the 1913 World Series. "Once it arrived in Philadelphia, because the World Series had started, they couldn't get dock workers to unload it," said Alessandro Pezzati, archivist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the sphinx's home for the last century.
NEWS
October 12, 2013
At a time when support for the arts is in flux, the city's cultural community has proven that it's still a font of creative ideas. Under a program launched last week, Philadelphia teenagers ages 14 through 19 can enjoy a year of free access to a dozen institutions, ranging from the National Constitution Center to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Of course, they can't skip school to look at a Kandinsky or a Gauguin. The free passes are valid only outside school hours. But if students spend enough of those hours at a museum or the zoo, their minds could be opened to worlds far more engaging than those offered by video games or Facebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia high school students are eligible for a year's free admission to 12 of the city's most prominent and popular art and cultural institutions, thanks to a new program to be launched Friday afternoon at a special ceremony at the African American Museum in Philadelphia. Dubbed STAMP, Students at Museums in Philly, the program began as a $75,000 Knight Foundation challenge grant two years ago. "STAMP reflects the cultural community's collective effort to invest in the youth of Philadelphia," Michael Norris, interim executive director of the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, said in a statement.
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gillian Wakely, 67, of Center City, the longtime head of education programming at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, died Wednesday, Aug. 14, of colon cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Wakely worked at the museum for 40 years, most of which she spent as head of its education department. She managed nearly 80 volunteer guides. A native of London, Ms. Wakely grew up viewing collections at the British Museum. When she moved to Philadelphia at 26 and visited the Penn museum for the first time, she was immediately captivated by the collections, she wrote in a letter published in the museum's magazine.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
GILLIAN WAKELY grew up in England, where her parents' idea of a fun time was to visit a museum. When she arrived in America, she came upon a photograph in an art-history book of the "Ram in a Thicket. " The anthropologically hip know of it as an exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It's the statue of a ram (more likely a goat) dug up in 1928 in the Royal Tombs of Ur in southern Iraq. Gillian knew about the 4,000-year-old figure because it was one of two found in Ur. The other was in the British Museum in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seven years ago, Tukufu Zuberi, a professor of sociology and Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania, decided to become a collector. The only question was, of what? He settled on images of the black body - specifically the black body in war - and went about acquiring a trove on his world travels. Zuberi's efforts have come together in a unique and compelling exhibition of posters portraying blacks in the military, from the Civil War through World War II and the African independence movements of the 1950s and '60s.
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