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Penn Museum

NEWS
September 11, 2011
Museumgoers this fall will be able to piece together crime-scene evidence via mass spectrometry, ponder bloodsucking creatures of the imagination, and consider the imperfect mosaic of nationhood as a parade of diverse and unusual exhibitions and programs marches through the region's specialized museums. Offerings include the start of a yearlong project seeking to "imagine Africa," a show of works exploring the African American imagination, an outdoor exhibition focusing on worldwide malnutrition, and a portable greenhouse of the future, complete with room for future fossils - a kind of museum-to-be.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
A page from some lost dictionary, a D page, with a line drawing of an oil derrick in the margin. A pair of wire-rimmed glasses, split at the bridge. These are some of the pieces included in the new exhibition at the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, "Excavating Ground Zero: Fragments from 9/11," a collection of objects recovered from the World Trade Center site since the 2001 attacks. The show, which runs through Nov. 6, will be bolstered by two special commemorative programs Sunday: a lecture about the architectural history of the twin towers and a unique theatrical performance called Cato: 9/11 , featuring one of George Washington's favorite plays, Joseph Addison's Cato: A Tragedy . The objects, which include a loudspeaker, glass ornaments, and a stairway sign, are on loan from the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York.
NEWS
August 7, 2011
Indicates wheelchair-accessible. Events are free unless otherwise indicated. Authors Margaret Thorell , "Swedes of the Delaware Valley," American Swedish Historical Museum, 1900 Pattison Ave; 215-389-1776 or www.americanswedish.org . $5 ASHM members, $10 nonmembers. 6 pm Wed. Special Events Pine Barrens Ecology & Wildlife Meet rehabilitated but nonreleasable animals & learn about Pine Barrens ecology. Bring lunch. Briar Bush Nature Center, 1212 Edgehill Rd., Abington; 215-887-6603 $40 9am-4pm Sun 2011 Summer Sampler Learn about the coming year at this evening of community, study, food, music, and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Richard Hodges, director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum, which made headlines in the spring when a much-anticipated show of antiquities and mummies was temporarily blocked from exhibition here by Chinese cultural authorities, will be leaving the museum in June 2012. In an e-mail sent Friday to museum and university staff members, Amy Gutmann, university president, and Vincent Price, provost, announced the departure and praised Hodges as a "dynamic and visionary director" since he joined the staff in 2007.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
When the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan late in 1979, its soldiers couldn't have known they were about to let slip the rugs of war. Yet in response to the 10-year Soviet occupation, and to the invasion in 2001 by the United States and its allies, Afghan weavers created a new genre of Oriental carpet, the "war rug. " Instead of the traditional flowers and animals, these rugs are decorated with images of military equipment - fighter planes,...
NEWS
April 12, 2011
Having served under three different directors as deputy director of Penn Museum, I read with interest the April 6 article on the "Silk Road" exhibit ("Penn Museum director declares its abbreviated exhibit of Chinese artifacts a success"). Director Richard Hodges called the show a "success," notwithstanding the debacle over artifacts that Beijing would only allow to be shown for four weeks, not the four months that Penn Museum trumpeted. Hodges was quoted as being pleased that, with this exhibit, Penn Museum went from being a "small cog" to a "major cog" at the university.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Despite a major diplomatic pratfall that caused artifacts to be spirited back to their homeland two months early, the Penn Museum's Secrets of the Silk Road exhibition managed to draw 42,807 visitors during the 39 days its Chinese materials were in residence. The highly touted show, featuring two mummies and about 130 artifacts from remote desert regions of western China, was originally scheduled to open Feb. 5. But a few days before that, Chinese authorities told Penn that the show had not been approved for Philadelphia and that the artifacts had to be returned, still packed, to China.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry C. Rogers Jr., 87, the A.W. Grosvenor Professor of Materials Engineering at Drexel University from 1984 to 1991, died of pneumonia at Albany (N.Y.) Stratton VA Medical Center on Wednesday, March 2. He was a longtime resident of Berwyn. Dr. Rogers was head of Drexel's department of materials engineering from 1987 to 1990. After graduating as salutatorian at Baldwin (N.Y.) High School in 1941, he interrupted his studies at DePauw University in 1943 to serve in the Army. His son, H. Carton III, said his wartime work helped develop fuses for airplane bombs at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.
FOOD
March 10, 2011 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In your years of spring cleaning, no doubt you've unearthed a strange something or two from the depths of your pantry or fridge. But that's nothing compared to the jaw-dropping food finds archaeologists discovered in recent years along the ancient trade route known as the Silk Road. Three kinds of cookies, a twisted doughnut, a spring roll, and a wonton, some dating back 2,500 years, are on display now through June 5 as part of the "Secrets of the Silk Road" exhibition at the Penn Museum.
NEWS
February 9, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Chinese antiquities at the heart of the Penn Museum's beleaguered and depleted "Secrets of the Silk Road" exhibition were never approved for display in Philadelphia, a Chinese Embassy spokesman said Tuesday, almost a week after the museum announced the pieces had been stripped from the show. The Chinese spokesman in Washington, Wang Baodong, blamed poor planning. "The exhibition has been on display in both California and Houston," Wang said. "For such a big exhibition, you've got to have good planning in the first place.
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