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NEWS
July 12, 1994 | By Greg McCullough, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The body of a Philadelphia woman who had apparently been slain elsewhere was found by a jogger yesterday morning in a patch of weeds in a residential area of Penn Valley, police said. The victim was identified as Lisa Gilbert, 25, of the Mill Creek section of West Philadelphia. An autopsy yesterday showed that she had been strangled, Lower Merion police said. "She definitely was not killed where we found her," said Lt. Mike Tansey. The body was found in the 1100 block of Hollow Road.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
A 23-year-old Narberth man was fatally injured Saturday evening when he was struck from behind by a car as he walked west on Hagys Ford Road in Penn Valley. David W. Carney, of the 200 block of North Narberth Avenue in Narberth, was rushed by Medevac helicopter to Hahnemann University Hospital's trauma unit in Philadelphia, where he was pronounced dead upon arrival. Police said Carney was walking along the side of the road about 6:05 p.m. when a car driven by Martin Davis, 67, of the 1600 block of Hagys Ford Road, struck him as it was traveling west on Hagys Ford Road just beyond Welsh Valley Middle School.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Phyllis Holtzman, Special to The Inquirer
A woman was killed and another was seriously injured Sunday morning when the car they were riding in was struck by another car at the intersection of Montgomery Avenue and Meeting House Lane in Penn Valley. Margaret Robertson, 19, of the 500 block of Cynwyd Circle, Bala Cynwyd, was pronounced dead at Lankenau Hospital a few hours after the early morning accident. Aurelia Falchi, 19, of Bryn Mawr Avenue, Bala Cynwyd, was listed in stable condition yesterday at Lankenau Hospital with a broken pelvis.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Marion Aubrey Cooney, 84, of Penn Valley, died April 2 at Lankenau Hospital in Lower Merion Township. She was a homemaker for most of her life. She was born in the Torresdale section of Philadelphia in 1904. She graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic High School in 1920 and later that year married Francis E. Cooney, who also was from Torresdale. A resident of the Main Line since 1950, Mrs. Cooney was a member of the American Kennel Club and was known for her expertise in obedience training for dogs.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aaron Shneyer's contribution to mediating conflict in the Middle East began with 12 teens and a jam session in Jerusalem. The Georgetown University graduate brought together a dozen Israeli and Palestinian musicians as part of a Fulbright-mtvU project that used music to foster dialogue and understanding. The result is Heartbeat, a peace-building collaboration that has been exported to the United States and will find its way to Congregation Beth Am Israel in Penn Valley on Thursday evening.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The vice president of the United States has the image of being just a tad wooden. But Wednesday night, he charmed the packed house with a series of "Al Gore jokes" at Har Zion Temple in Penn Valley. "Last time I was here I was on crutches," he said. "I broke my Achilles tendon playing basketball. I'm fine now although they tell me I'll have to continue to wear the full-body cast. " His humor, however, did not overshadow the more serious issues he wanted to address as the keynote speaker at the 93d Annual Banquet of the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | By Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gloria Goldstein is a miniature woman. It's not that she's petite. She's just into small stuff. Making it. Collecting it. Decorating it. During a recent tour of her mini-world, Goldstein showed off her mini-wares in her Penn Valley apartment. A delicate woman with gray hair pulled back in a neat bun, she slowly opens the glass doors of a painted cabinet in her living room, and the cabinet becomes a detailed Victorian dollhouse with eight mysterious mini-rooms. Portraits line its papered walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff, Daily News Staff Writer
HER CRYSTALLINE, sky-blue eyes probably caught your attention before you even read these words. CBS3's Eyewitness News team has a permanent replacement for former traffic reporter Bob Kelly , who moved over to work the roads for Fox 29 in October. Enter Meisha Johnson , who starts Monday. Johnson drove more than 1,100 miles from Minneapolis to Philadelphia, and she'll soon appear on "Eyewitness News This Morning. " This frees up Vittoria Woodill , a freelancer, to do other projects for the station, including CBS3's "Down the Shore" segment, which airs from a different beach town every Thursday.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | JAY GORODETZER / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Rabbi Gerald Wolpe joins several Har Zion Temple day campers, wearing plastic hard hats, to mark the groundbreaking for the new religious school wing. The ceremony was yesterday in Penn Valley.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Joyce Xi doesn't want to see another family go through what hers has endured. That's why the daughter of the Temple University professor who was accused of spying for China, in charges that were then dropped, is demanding an apology from President Obama and Attorney General Loretta Lynch to her father and other Asian Americans wrongly charged. "I think it's important to have a public effort highlighting these injustices that my dad and others have faced, and also to be able to hold the government accountable," said Xi, 23, who graduated from Yale University on Monday with a degree in chemistry.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
U.S. District Senior Judge Norma Shapiro, 87, of Penn Valley, a pioneering jurist in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, died Friday, July 22, at Lankenau Hospital of natural causes. The first female judge in the federal court district made up of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, Judge Shapiro was nominated to the court by President Jimmy Carter in August 1978. Though she had not been at work for a few months, she had been planning to return to her duties on the bench, her family said.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
DURING WORLD WAR II, Edward K. Hueber, a Navy petty officer stationed in Norfolk, Va., helped teach sailors how to survive when cast adrift. He appeared to know to make water a friend. After the war, he was captain of the swim team at Yale University in the 1946-47 academic year, when it ran up a record of 13-0. In 1946 and 1947, Yale won the championship of the Eastern Intercollegiate Swim League, a predecessor of the Ivy League. "He was a sprinter on a four-man relay team," his wife, Josephine, said.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
During World War II, Edward K. Hueber, a Navy petty officer stationed in Norfolk, Va., helped teach sailors how to survive when cast adrift. He appeared to know to make water a friend. After the war, he was captain of the swim team at Yale University in the 1946-47 academic year, when it ran up a record of 13-0. In 1946 and 1947, Yale won the championship of the Eastern Intercollegiate Swim League, a predecessor of the Ivy League. "He was a sprinter on a four-man relay team," his wife, Josephine, said.
NEWS
May 26, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Joyce Xi doesn't want to see another family go through what hers has endured. That's why the daughter of the Temple University professor who was accused of spying for China, in charges that were then dropped, is demanding an apology from President Obama and Attorney General Loretta Lynch to her father and other Asian Americans wrongly charged. "I think it's important to have a public effort highlighting these injustices that my dad and others have faced, and also to be able to hold the government accountable," said Xi, 23, who graduated from Yale University on Monday with a degree in chemistry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
At her family's Passover seder last April, Rabbi Debra Orenstein opted for the layered look: an ordinary T-shirt topped by a purple-and-black blouse made in India - and very likely sewn in a sweatshop by slave labor. At the moment when the seder's leader typically holds up a piece of matzo and declares, "This is the bread of affliction" - symbolizing the ancient Israelites' enslavement and hasty flight from Egypt - Orenstein startled her guests by peeling off the Indian blouse. "This," she announced, "is the shirt of affliction!"
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Richard G. Lonsdorf, 93, of Gladwyne, a professor of psychiatry and law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and a nationally known expert on the insanity defense, died Friday, March 18. Dr. Lonsdorf died of congestive heart failure at the Waverly Heights retirement community. In the 1950s, Dr. Lonsdorf, by then a psychiatrist, agreed to help the school develop a course in forensic law, dealing with legal issues relating to the criminal mind. The course became a mainstay of the curriculum, and Dr. Lornsdorf taught it for more than 40 years to generations of Philadelphia lawyers and judges.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
HIGH ABOVE the Schuylkill River, joyful folks from Manayunk and Lower Merion Township met in the middle of the Manayunk Bridge yesterday to reopen it as a trail that joins the two communities for the first time in 30 years. Just before the ceremonies began, John Newhall, 82, from Penn Valley, told the Daily News that his golden retriever, Lucy, 7, who was demanding love from everyone within barking range, was the first dog to cross the bridge. "Lucy and I walked across from the Cynwyd Heritage Trail at 10:15 this morning," Newhall said, smiling.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
FEDERAL prosecutors yesterday filed a motion to dismiss an indictment against a Temple University physics professor who had been accused of sharing sensitive technology with his native China. Xiaoxing Xi, 57, the former chairman of Temple's physics department, had been indicted by a grand jury on four counts of wire fraud in May. In their motion, prosecutors wrote that since the indictment, "additional information came to the attention of the government" and "it is in the interests of justice to dismiss the indictment without prejudice in order to pursue this additional information.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
D. Dudley Bloom, 92, of Penn Valley, a retired real estate executive, died Thursday, Aug. 20, of causes related to aging at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Mr. Bloom had several careers. He was the first businessman to suggest that travel and other everyday pieces of luggage should have wheels for ease of movement. His suggestion came in 1957 while serving as marketing vice president for what became Atlantic Luggage Company; ultimately, though, he could not convince officials at Atlantic of the efficacy of rolling luggage, so another firm patented the invention.
NEWS
August 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josie Lecks, 86, of Haverford, a mother, reading specialist, and fund-raiser, died Saturday, July 25, of cancer at her home. She was the widow of Leonard E. Lecks, a cardiologist who practiced at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital for more than 30 years. Mrs. Lecks was the granddaughter of Joseph Salus, a banker. The Salus family also produced several prominent lawyers, including Samuel W. Salus, a Pennsylvania state senator from 1911 to 1938. In 1940, Mrs. Lecks moved with her parents to Hollywood, where she attended a performing-arts school.
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