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NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
As fund-raisers go, it's hardly extravagant - a donation of $10 a plate for dinner at Rangoon Restaurant in Chinatown. But a couple thousand dollars can buy plenty in Myanmar, the poor Southeast Asian land emerging from decades of military rule. And for Whispering Seed, an orphanage run there by Penn Valley's Jim Connor, the money means everything. "Even the smallest donations go a long way over here," Connor said in an e-mail from Asia. About 50 people have signed on for a Wednesday night banquet that organizers hope will be the first of many.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a painful past marked by time in Nazi labor and concentration camps, relatives said, Peter Siegler's warm and humorous personality never hardened. Dr. Siegler, 89, of Haverford, died Wednesday, June 5, of heart disease at his Naples, Fla., townhouse. The Hungarian native's first impression of America came in 1945, when he was starving and sick after spending about six months in a concentration camp in Austria during his 20s. He was liberated by soldiers, and when he asked for a smoke, a GI handed him not just one cigarette but a pack of Camels.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
DURING WORLD WAR II, Edward K. Hueber, a Navy petty officer stationed in Norfolk, Va., helped teach sailors how to survive when cast adrift. He appeared to know to make water a friend. After the war, he was captain of the swim team at Yale University in the 1946-47 academic year, when it ran up a record of 13-0. In 1946 and 1947, Yale won the championship of the Eastern Intercollegiate Swim League, a predecessor of the Ivy League. "He was a sprinter on a four-man relay team," his wife, Josephine, said.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
DURING A BRIEF appearance before a federal magistrate yesterday, a Temple University professor accused of sharing sensitive technology with his native China pleaded not guilty. Xiaoxing Xi, 57, the former chairman of Temple's physics department, dressed in a blue pinstriped suit, stood in the hallway outside the courtroom afterward with his wife. When asked if he had any comment, he told reporters: "Probably should talk to my lawyer. " Attorney Peter Zeidenberg, of the Arent Fox firm in Washington, D.C., later said: "Professor Xi is innocent of these charges.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fred Blume, 72, chairman emeritus of the prestigious Blank Rome law firm in Philadelphia, died Monday, April 8, at his Penn Valley home after a long illness. For several decades, Mr. Blume battled a rare pancreatic tumor, said his wife, Sylvia "Sivy" Blume. Despite his illness, he served as Blank Rome's managing partner and chief executive officer from 2003 to 2006. "He was totally and completely dedicated to Blank Rome," his wife said. Morey Rosenbloom, a longtime friend and partner at the firm, said: "He was a lawyer's lawyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in the '50s in the Jewish neighborhood then centered on Rising Sun Avenue and Roosevelt Boulevard, Charles Sherman had an insulated, even charmed, childhood. "My whole life as a kid was within three blocks," he said. "You walked to the grocery store, to your synagogue. I had four or five aunts who lived within one block. I had cousins. It was a different kind of way of looking at community. " He went as far as Jenkintown, where the family's business, Botwinick's, outfitted a generation of bat mitzvah girls in taffeta and tulle; and Bryn Mawr, for Akiba Hebrew Academy.
NEWS
December 8, 1992 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Funeral services were to be held this morning for Frank E. Prettyman, a former Campbell Soup Co. employee and amateur song-and-dance man, who died Thursday. He was 73 and lived in South Philadelphia. Prettyman had worked in the factory at Campbell Soup in Camden for 15 years. He also was known in his 17th and Christian streets neighborhood as a man who loved to sing and dance. "He tap danced and sang at the Dixie Theater on Point Breeze Avenue in South Philadelphia and at the Earl Theater," said Helen Williams, one of his daughters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
At her family's Passover seder last April, Rabbi Debra Orenstein opted for the layered look: an ordinary T-shirt topped by a purple-and-black blouse made in India - and very likely sewn in a sweatshop by slave labor. At the moment when the seder's leader typically holds up a piece of matzo and declares, "This is the bread of affliction" - symbolizing the ancient Israelites' enslavement and hasty flight from Egypt - Orenstein startled her guests by peeling off the Indian blouse. "This," she announced, "is the shirt of affliction!"
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MY FRIEND Sammye has never claimed to be a domestic goddess. "The only reason I have a kitchen is it came with the house," she'll proclaim in her distinctive Mississippi twang. And she's not alone. There are plenty of Americans who say that they don't or can't cook - about 28 percent, or almost a third, according to a survey conducted by Impulse Research on behalf of Bosch home appliances. To someone like myself, who loves everything about the cooking process, how these folks manage to feed themselves is a mystery.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
The Democratic campaign for mayor is coming into your mailbox as the wide-open five-way race enters its frantic final 72 hours. And not all political mailings are alike. John Street's campaign, for example, has been mailing out two different glossy brochures about the former City Council chief. One features a car whizzing past a sign that reads, "Welcome to Montgomery County" -_ a thinly disguised slap at Marty Weinberg and the luxury home he bought in Penn Valley in 1997.
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