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Penn Valley

NEWS
June 3, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Marketing, accounting, crafting a business plan: You name it, and the Executive Service Corps (ESC) of the Delaware Valley, based in Ardmore, has a volunteer consultant for the job. The ESC is a nonprofit organization that helps other nonprofits, not with dollars but with the donated management expertise of its approximately 180 volunteers in the region, said administrative assistant Ellen Aspinall. Seven Main Line residents recently have joined the ESC volunteer ranks. They are: Jeanne Cook of Narberth, former vice president and general counsel at Hill International Inc.; Edmund P. Flynn of Devon, former director of finance and operations for Morgard Inc. in New York City; T. Frank Gannon of Haverford, retired vice president for technical services with Wyeth-Ayers Inc.; Paul R. Kelley of Havertown, former director of testing services with the National Board of Medical Examiners; David J. Martin of Wayne, retired executive vice president and chief counsel for CoreStates Bank; Howard R. Morgan of Wayne, president of Morganics Inc., a marketing firm; and T. William Roberts of Villanova, retired president of Roberts Engineering Sales Co. REAL ESTATE Roach Wheeler/Better Homes and Gardens, created one year ago when Roach Bros.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Try as he can, Michael Tessler can't dispel the image of his roommate, Rhodes scholar Jonathan Levine, as a scientific Superman. Levine is brilliant, kind, giving and humble. A devoted student, be it of physics or the Torah. A 21-year-old who spends his precious free time listening to opera and teaching Sunday school. The Cornell University senior even keeps their apartment neat, and cooks a mighty fine meal. If slacker revelry is the norm for their generation, Tessler says, "I guess Jonathan's not normal.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you get from Philadelphia to Myanmar? It's easy, Jim Connor says: Turn left at Thailand. The hard part comes once you're there, trying to work with and around a slowly, slowly opening government that's not used to outsiders and is particularly suspicious of social workers. Connor, 40, spent the last decade on the contentious Thailand-Myanmar border, his Whispering Seed project providing housing, education, and job skills to orphans and to children from displaced families.
LIVING
March 12, 1996 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The worlds of Gloria Goldstein are tiny, exquisitely furnished spaces, replete with needlepoint carpets, original paintings, handsome furniture, and elaborate fixtures. They are the many rooms of her heart, filled with love and longing for the lost lives of two daughters and a granddaughter. Her tiny worlds - miniature rooms created and furnished during sleepless nights of grieving - are tributes to those lost girls, as well as fantastical expressions of what their futures could have been.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MY FRIEND Sammye has never claimed to be a domestic goddess. "The only reason I have a kitchen is it came with the house," she'll proclaim in her distinctive Mississippi twang. And she's not alone. There are plenty of Americans who say that they don't or can't cook - about 28 percent, or almost a third, according to a survey conducted by Impulse Research on behalf of Bosch home appliances. To someone like myself, who loves everything about the cooking process, how these folks manage to feed themselves is a mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
The topic was Cat's Cradle . For an hour, 10 women talked - sometimes over one another - to discuss not just the sci-fi classic by Kurt Vonnegut, but also the Cold War, organized religion, and Central America. They talked about TV shows like House and Game of Thrones , literary characters like Sherlock Holmes, and authors like Jane Austen and William Faulkner. They laughed. A lot. It was a typical book-club meeting for an atypical book club. Ten years ago, at a time when most 8-year-olds were learning fractions, five second-graders were pulled from the playground by their mothers to their first book-club meeting.
SPORTS
November 8, 2013 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, Daily News Staff Writer alberta@phillynews.com
A DEEP run in March can kickstart a program. The morale around an entire campus can change with one miraculous stretch of games during March Madness. March and April of last season were times that the Drexel women's basketball program will not soon forget. The Dragons took home their first-ever WNIT championship with a 46-43 win over Utah. "It has been interesting, it seems to be coming up a lot," coach Denise Dillon said. "Obviously we finished the year on a great run, winning that championship.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camille Quattrone Ridarelli, 60, of Penn Valley, wife of former teen idol Bobby Rydell, her high school sweetheart, died Monday of cancer at Lankenau Hospital in Wynnewood. She and Roberto Ridarelli - Bobby Rydell was a stage name - grew up blocks from each other in South Philadelphia. In an interview several years ago, she said that when she was a student at St. Maria Goretti High School, "I used to see him on the trolley car when he went to [the old] Bishop Neumann, and wait for him, but he never gave me a second look.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Ron Todt, Associated Press
A Yale student from Penn Valley, near Narberth, will head to England to study at Oxford as one of 32 Rhodes scholars named for 2013. David Carel, an economics major, received the scholarship established in 1902 by the will of British philanthropist Cecil Rhodes. "I keep sort of checking my phone to see if this actually happened," Carel said Sunday. "It's so hard to believe, I just sort of assume I dreamed the whole thing. " Carel, 21, said he spent much of his undergraduate years studying global health economics, mostly public health, and plans to study comparative social policy.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Parents from the Penn Valley School have warned the Lower Merion school board to prepare for additional students next fall by renovating space for more classrooms over the summer. A group of parents, appearing at Monday's board meeting, told the board that they did not agree with the district's projections for enrollments during the next school year. Nancy Beeuwkes, president of the Penn Valley Parent School Association, wrote to the board that while the district had projected 500 to 514 students for the 1986-87 school year, the enrollment is 538. "The projection for next year is 536, and we don't believe that," said Alice Dustin, chairwoman of the Special Parent Action Committee on Enrollment at Penn Valley.
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