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SPORTS
October 29, 2010
TAKE THIS job and shove it. That's basically what Rangers fan Boris Briskin told his boss when told he couldn't take time off to watch his team clinch the American League pennant. According to Yahoo! Sports, Briskin, of Plano, Texas, quit his job as a law clerk in Southern California after being told he couldn't get vacation time to go to Arlington for Game 6 of the American League Championship Series. The Rangers defeated the Yankees, 6-1, in that game to advance to the World Series.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1987 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
I have a 1969 New York Mets National League championship pennant for the World Series. It is in good shape, with the names of all the ballplayers and the manager. Do you know its value? Because 1969 brought the "Miracle Mets" their first National League pennant (and their first World Series victory) and because Mets and Yankees material is sought by collectors, your 1969 Mets NL champions pennant (sold at the World Series) is worth $20 to $30, according to Bob Schmierer, who heads the Eastern Pennsylvania Sports Collectors Club, Box 37, Maple Glen, Pa. 19002.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | BY JOSHUA KLEIN
If history can repeat itself, the Philadelphia Phillies should win the National League pennant this year. I know that's a bold prediction considering the way the Phillies have played so far this season. The circumstances, however, make this an easy prediction. Every year a filly (please note the difference in spelling) has won the Kentucky Derby, the Phillies have claimed a pennant. So until Winning Colors darted across the finish line May 7, I'd written off the Phillies.
SPORTS
May 29, 2016 | By Ed Rendell
IF YOU READ this column, you probably know that I grew up in New York, rooted for the baseball Giants and hated the New York Yankees (as most Giants and Dodgers fans did). So when my beloved Giants left for San Francisco in 1958, I decided to root for the American League team that had the best chance to beat the Yankees. That turned out to be the Chicago White Sox. I have been a White Sox fan since, (and, of course, a Phillies fan in the NL). My adopted team rewarded me by winning the AL pennant in 1959, the first year I rooted for them.
NEWS
October 13, 1993 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The calm before the storm. Philadelphia is poised to semi-explode this evening - all the Phillies have to do is win the National League pennant over the Atlanta Braves in Game 6 at Veterans Stadium. The super explosion, of course, will follow the Phillies' World Series victory. But that's next week. Two astonishing victories Sunday and Monday in Atlanta left the Phillies one game shy of their first pennant since 1983. And acting very much like a team of destiny. The signs of fan excitement were everywhere: the Phillies cap worn by an ophthalmologist's receptionist, friendly waves among red-jacketed strangers, wisps of conversation at every lunch counter and water cooler, even Phillies chit-chat on WXPN-FM's public radio begathon.
SPORTS
June 17, 1993 | by Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
For much of the 1983 baseball season, the Phillies seemed more like a wax museum than a team. There were familiar faces everywhere, lots of history, but no signs of life. They had Joe Morgan, Pete Rose, Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt, but all they did was collect dust for four months in the National League East. They were sputtering along in fourth place, two games under .500 in late July. Morgan was hitting around .200. Rose was mired in the low .240s. The team picture was a Dorian Gray portrait, aging by the day. Sixteen players on the roster were over the age of 30. Four were in their 40s, with Rose the oldest at 42. "The Wheeze Kids", that was the label Daily News columnist Stan Hochman put on them in spring training, and it stuck.
SPORTS
June 20, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the Phillies swaggered onto the Nationals Park grass for the start of their 2010 season, they looked nothing like a team that less than two months later would detour into a forest of self-doubt. They'd been to consecutive World Series and, given the trade for Roy Halladay and the shortcomings of many National League rivals, seemed destined for a third. "With the additions they made and the offense they had, they were head and shoulders above everybody else. They had an edge," said John Smoltz, the longtime Braves pitcher.
SPORTS
September 4, 1988 | By Frank Dolson, Inquirer Sports Editor
"Sometimes," Phillies manager Lee Elia likes to say, "you can add by subtracting. " And sometimes you can lose by winning, which is what the Phillies may very well have done five years ago. To Bill Giles and his partners, 1983 must have seemed like the start of a giddy joy ride. Just one year under their belts as the proud owners of a major-league baseball franchise and they were in a World Series. "I almost had to laugh after '83," said Paul Owens, who came down from the front office in midseason to manage.
SPORTS
September 9, 2001 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine how envious Larry Bowa would be if he could see and feel the energy that pulsates through the Chicago Cubs clubhouse these days. A year after sharing living space with the Phillies in the National League basement, the Cubs also have postseason aspirations. But while the Phillies' collective pulse thub-dubs slowly as October approaches - maddening their manager - the Cubs' heartbeat races as if it just gulped down a dozen double espressos. Look behind the counter and you will see that Sammy Sosa is the guy serving up those super-charged cups of caffeine.
SPORTS
August 2, 1992 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They've played a large part of their season with light-hitting Rey Sanchez at shortstop, the since-demoted Gary Scott at third base, the immortal Doug Dascenzo in center field. Yet, the Chicago Cubs, 9 1/2 games out of first place on July 18 and a team that has scored the fewest runs in the majors, find themselves in the middle of a pennant race. God bless the wretched National League East where anybody can be winner. "There's no Oakland or Toronto here," said Larry Himes, the Cubs' executive vice president of baseball operations, "and in that sense, it's good because fan interest is up. Everybody is involved.
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SPORTS
May 29, 2016 | By Ed Rendell
IF YOU READ this column, you probably know that I grew up in New York, rooted for the baseball Giants and hated the New York Yankees (as most Giants and Dodgers fans did). So when my beloved Giants left for San Francisco in 1958, I decided to root for the American League team that had the best chance to beat the Yankees. That turned out to be the Chicago White Sox. I have been a White Sox fan since, (and, of course, a Phillies fan in the NL). My adopted team rewarded me by winning the AL pennant in 1959, the first year I rooted for them.
SPORTS
August 15, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the second of Stan Baumgartner's noteworthy Philadelphia careers, his colleagues in the Baker Bowl's press box liked to toss peanuts at his head every time the Inquirer sportswriter dozed off. Once awakened, the native Texan typically produced stories that were dry, matter-of-fact accounts, the journalistic equivalent of the mediocre numbers he had posted as a pitcher for the Phillies and Athletics. Still, 60 years after his death, Baumgartner continues to occupy a special and unique place in Phillies history, the only link between the franchise's first two pennant winners.
SPORTS
September 27, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Books, magazines, and newspapers are filled with stories about the 1964 Phillies' late-season collapse, and the general consensus is that manager Gene Mauch blew the pennant by overusing star pitchers Jim Bunning and Chris Short down the stretch. Fifty years later, many of the '64 Phillies disagree with that theory, pointing to an injury suffered by slugging first baseman Frank Thomas as the trigger to the 10-game tailspin, one that erased a 61/2-game lead in the National League.
SPORTS
October 5, 2012 | Associated Press
BOSTON - Former Red Sox outfielder Carl Yastrzemski thinks that being in a pennant race will help Detroit's Miguel Cabrera in his attempt to win the Triple Crown. And Yaz should know: He's the last player to lead his league in batting average, homers, and RBIs in the same season. "In '67, the Triple Crown was never even mentioned once," Yastrzemski said last week. "We were so involved in the pennant race, I didn't know I won the Triple Crown until the next day, when I read it in the paper.
SPORTS
October 15, 2011 | Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Texas - Nelson Cruz is again swinging his big boomstick in October for the Texas Rangers, who are one win from their second consecutive trip to the World Series. Only 31/2 years ago, Cruz was waived at the end of spring training but went unclaimed and was sent to the minors. It's been quite a turnaround. "That period of time in Nelson's life, he hadn't arrived yet. You know, we all got to experience things before we finally make our way to where we want to be," manager Ron Washington said Friday.
SPORTS
October 29, 2010
TAKE THIS job and shove it. That's basically what Rangers fan Boris Briskin told his boss when told he couldn't take time off to watch his team clinch the American League pennant. According to Yahoo! Sports, Briskin, of Plano, Texas, quit his job as a law clerk in Southern California after being told he couldn't get vacation time to go to Arlington for Game 6 of the American League Championship Series. The Rangers defeated the Yankees, 6-1, in that game to advance to the World Series.
SPORTS
October 8, 2010 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
The Reds are an interesting bunch. Especially Dusty Baker. The man is an odd cat - or dog, rather. He's more of a dog guy, as it turns out. This week, in the run-up to the National League division series, the Reds' manager happily offered some fascinating personal information. Among the revelations: a detailed recap of a scrap he got into with an unruly crew of Canadians during the 1981 World Series - a brawl that rendered him one-handed for days thereafter because he ostensibly mashed a few of our northern neighbors into creamy poutine.
SPORTS
October 6, 2010 | By Bill Conlin, Daily News Columnist
LUCKY ME. IN 1966, my first season as the Phillies beat writer, they were favored to win the National League pennant. Sports Illustrated said so. They became an even hotter pick on April 21 when GM John Quinn acquired manager Gene Mauch's biggest need - veteran righthanded starting pitching. A solid No. 3 and 4 to buttress aces Jim Bunning and Chris Short. All it cost Quinn to pry former 24-game winner Larry Jackson and elderly swing man Bob Buhl from the Cubs was an obscure rookie reliever named Ferguson Jenkins, reserve first baseman John Herrnstein and outfield prospect Adolfo Phillips.
SPORTS
October 5, 2010
So the Phils end up with Cincinnati. Were the Reds the best possible scenario for them? Or would you have preferred to see them play San Francisco or San Diego? Please refrain from basing your decisions on which city you'd prefer to have visited. I don't think it matters whom the Phils play. I just don't see anyone in the National League beating them, not with their pitching and their bats. The only pitfall could be overconfidence, and Uncle Cholly ain't gonna let that happen. Considering Page 2 doesn't travel until the NLCS, I'm thrilled to get Cincy out of the way. People actually live there?
SPORTS
September 8, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
It isn't a long season. Not anymore. For months, baseball people dismiss all mishap and misfortune by invoking the grueling marathon of the schedule. Slumps, injuries, bad plays and questionable managerial moves ? they're all swept away with those four words: "It's a long season. " In April and May, June and July, it's true. There's time, always time. But now, a week into September, the long season is down to 22 games. The Phillies, facing the twin challenges of reaching the playoffs and setting themselves up to make a strong run, played Tuesday night with September urgency.
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