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Pennsylvania Farm Show

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NEWS
January 9, 1993 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
You've heard of the goose that lays the golden egg. How about chickens that lay eggs of pink, green and blue? Inside the massive complex of the Pennsylvania Farm Show, the yearly agriculture exhibition that kicks off for the 77th time today, you could see them - they're called Araucana chickens - and more than 5,000 other birds and animals. "They lay pastel-color eggs," Herbert C. Jordan, chairman of the show's poultry events, said of the Araucanas. "There are some people who believe they come from another world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013
Film New this week: Zero Dark Thirty (**** out of four stars) Kathryn Bigelow's slow-burning and brilliant account of the decade-long Osama bin Laden manhunt, with Jessica Chastain as the CIA officer determined to track the al-Qaeda figure down, no matter what. Rated R.    - Steven Rea Music Midge Ure From the boy-band bubblegum of Silk in the '70s to the synth-pop of Ultravox in the '80s - with stops at Thin Lizzy, the Rich Kids, and Visage in between - Midge Ure has long been a centerpiece of the musical landscape in the United Kingdom.
NEWS
January 13, 2012
HARRISBURG - A Belgian draft horse died this week during a pulling competition at the Pennsylvania Farm Show. The 10-year-old horse, named Mark, died Tuesday after pulling a weighted sled with another horse. The horse that died appeared fit, draft horse owners told the Public Opinion newspaper of Chambersburg. The Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory performed a necropsy and toxicology screening, but results were not available yet, the newspaper reported. A witness, Tiffany Plessinger, told the newspaper the horse was unhitched after a full pull, took two steps, and fell over.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Cows do it. Pigs do it. Even educated hens do it. But at the Pennsylvania Farm Show, it isn't causing anyone to fall in love. At the Pennsylvania Farm Show, it is something to avoid stepping in. And with 5,200 cows, swine, goats, chickens, geese, ducks, rabbits, horses and sheep all doing it, production is at full tilt. It, midway through the week-long show, was a 10-foot-high, 40-foot-long, 10-foot-wide steaming pile of manure in a side parking lot of the farm show complex.
NEWS
January 24, 2008 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
Honey Brook resident Sarah Rose Lownes may not live on a farm and is only 15, but that didn't stop her from taking home the Grand Championship Angus trophy at the 2008 Pennsylvania Farm Show. Charming, her 1,290-pound Black Angus, took the top prize for its body structure, size and showmanship. Lownes also earned a Master Showmanship prize. "I was very surprised, very thankful and very happy," said Lownes when she found out her steer won Jan. 6 in Harrisburg, earning her a $55 prize.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Standing amid the lunchtime crush at the Pennsylvania Farm Show last week was a gray-haired man in deck shoes and a fleece vest, animatedly pitching an unusual - and illegal - product. Like a street-corner preacher, Sen. Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon) was bringing his message to the people - in his case thousands of voters he hopes will pressure their representatives to support his bill to legalize medical marijuana. Folmer stops anyone who will listen, alternately delivering a rant against Big Pharma - which he blames for holding up federal approval of medical cannabis - and smiling at wise-cracking visitors who ask, "Any free samples?"
NEWS
January 28, 1999 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even Noah's ark might have had trouble accommodating all of the four-legged and wing-flapping visitors to the Pennsylvania Farm Show this month. Let's see, there were 136 horses, 729 pigs, 624 rabbits, 244 goats, 861 sheep, 533 beef cattle, 521 milk cows, 769 chickens, 235 ducks and 79 geese. And, oh yes, there were hundreds upon hundreds of two-legged critters as well - children and teenagers taking part in 4-H and Future Farmers of America programs. The young people were there to show off what they have done and can do: raising and showing animals and demonstrating any number of important life skills, such as farm mechanics and cooking.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Each year, Pennsylvania produces a half-billion dollars' worth of mushrooms, three million pounds of tart cherries, more than seven billion chicken eggs, and what's billed as the country's largest indoor agricultural event. That winter tradition, the Pennsylvania Farm Show, formally opens Saturday for an eight-day run that showcases the many aspects of life on the state's 62,000 farms. This year marks the 97th time the event has been held, with a schedule of events at the 24-acre Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg that includes livestock judging, cooking contests and exhibitions, rodeo competitions, and tractor pulls.
NEWS
January 21, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Douglas Howe competed at the Pennsylvania Farm Show for seven years as a youth, he won no better than third- and fourth-place prizes. His wife, Jenny, never competed because she was not raised in a farm family. But five of their six children are old enough to compete at the annual state show in Harrisburg. And so they competed this year. Did they ever. Showing their Hereford heifers - young cows - Howe children Austin, 16, Andre, 14, Aleesha, 12, Nigel, 10, and Ethan, 8, walked away with 17 first-place prizes.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Men with discriminating taste read GQ, and women in the know read Cosmo. For sheep, there's just one place to learn what's cool in wool - the Pennsylvania Farm Show, the yearly agricultural exhibition that opens for the 75th time today. Unless you were raised by shepherds, you might not realize that the way sheep are sheared for shows changes year after year, just as, well, haircuts and clothing styles for people. "Show preparation follows fads, like fashion," said Ann Staver, a Palmyra, Lebanon County, science teacher, who, along with her husband, Kenneth, operates Ovine Alley Dorsets, a farm of 50 mature ewes.
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NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sue Miller loves hanging out in her cheese cave. "Sometimes I get attached to certain wheels of cheese," said Miller, co-owner of Birchrun Hills Farm, a dairy farm in Chester Springs. "And my husband says, 'You know, it's meant to be sold.' " She knows. Her love of cheese grew out of necessity. About nine years ago, declining milk prices and rising costs had Miller and her husband, Ken, worried they might lose the small farm they hoped one day to pass on to their two sons.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Standing amid the lunchtime crush at the Pennsylvania Farm Show last week was a gray-haired man in deck shoes and a fleece vest, animatedly pitching an unusual - and illegal - product. Like a street-corner preacher, Sen. Mike Folmer (R., Lebanon) was bringing his message to the people - in his case thousands of voters he hopes will pressure their representatives to support his bill to legalize medical marijuana. Folmer stops anyone who will listen, alternately delivering a rant against Big Pharma - which he blames for holding up federal approval of medical cannabis - and smiling at wise-cracking visitors who ask, "Any free samples?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - While Punxsutawney Phil's appearance is a harbinger of spring (or not), January's weather prognosticator is the annual Pennsylvania Farm Show. The event's arrival, regulars will tell you, often ushers in deep winter's harshest week, with snow and frigid temperatures. But fear not, Farm Show fans and first-timers, all the action - from baby-duck races to pulling contests by giant draft horses - takes place under the roof of Harrisburg's sprawling Farm Show Complex & Expo Center.
NEWS
January 7, 2014
THE PENNSYLVANIA Farm Show in Harrisburg is for me a siren. It calls. I go. I went Saturday for the opening of the 98th annual weeklong event. How long have I been going? Well, in the 1950s when my father was capitol correspondent for the Harrisburg Patriot , the governor previewed shows with journalists and their families. One year I had my picture taken with the show's first-born calf. Photo ran in the next day's paper, making me a famous-for-a-day first-grader.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Geography may divide Pennsylvanians, especially when it comes to sports teams, but there is one annual event that brings people together from all corners of the state under one roof to celebrate a common love of food: the Pennsylvania Farm Show. Urban and rural, old and young, political muckety-mucks and regular folks all descend each January on the historic Farm Show Complex here to take part in the nation's largest indoor agricultural event. Starting Friday, about half a million people and 6,000 animals will cross the threshold of the complex over the course of the nine-day exposition.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Each year, Pennsylvania produces a half-billion dollars' worth of mushrooms, three million pounds of tart cherries, more than seven billion chicken eggs, and what's billed as the country's largest indoor agricultural event. That winter tradition, the Pennsylvania Farm Show, formally opens Saturday for an eight-day run that showcases the many aspects of life on the state's 62,000 farms. This year marks the 97th time the event has been held, with a schedule of events at the 24-acre Farm Show Complex in Harrisburg that includes livestock judging, cooking contests and exhibitions, rodeo competitions, and tractor pulls.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013
Film New this week: Zero Dark Thirty (**** out of four stars) Kathryn Bigelow's slow-burning and brilliant account of the decade-long Osama bin Laden manhunt, with Jessica Chastain as the CIA officer determined to track the al-Qaeda figure down, no matter what. Rated R.    - Steven Rea Music Midge Ure From the boy-band bubblegum of Silk in the '70s to the synth-pop of Ultravox in the '80s - with stops at Thin Lizzy, the Rich Kids, and Visage in between - Midge Ure has long been a centerpiece of the musical landscape in the United Kingdom.
NEWS
January 13, 2012
HARRISBURG - A Belgian draft horse died this week during a pulling competition at the Pennsylvania Farm Show. The 10-year-old horse, named Mark, died Tuesday after pulling a weighted sled with another horse. The horse that died appeared fit, draft horse owners told the Public Opinion newspaper of Chambersburg. The Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory performed a necropsy and toxicology screening, but results were not available yet, the newspaper reported. A witness, Tiffany Plessinger, told the newspaper the horse was unhitched after a full pull, took two steps, and fell over.
NEWS
January 24, 2008 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
Honey Brook resident Sarah Rose Lownes may not live on a farm and is only 15, but that didn't stop her from taking home the Grand Championship Angus trophy at the 2008 Pennsylvania Farm Show. Charming, her 1,290-pound Black Angus, took the top prize for its body structure, size and showmanship. Lownes also earned a Master Showmanship prize. "I was very surprised, very thankful and very happy," said Lownes when she found out her steer won Jan. 6 in Harrisburg, earning her a $55 prize.
NEWS
January 31, 2007 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yes, these are the commonwealth's polka champions, winning their fifth consecutive blue ribbon at the Pennsylvania Farm Show this month. "At first, I thought polka would be good for a laugh," says Quyne Rider, 25, who, as far as she knows, doesn't have a milliliter of Polish blood in her muscular dancer's body. "People notice when we polka," says her partner Peter Kozak, 24. "Maybe Quyne stands out a little. " Invariably, Rider - her first name pronounced "Quinn" - is the only African American competing in the farm show's Equine Arena or at the polka dances she loves to attend, like Dick Pillar's Polkabration in Connecticut and Wildwood's annual Polka Spree by the Sea. For the record, Kozak isn't Polish, either.
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