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Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association

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NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Frank Lawlor, Special to The Inquirer
A hearing of the permanent injunction request filed by the Central League against the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association has been postponed and may not be heard before September. As a result, student-athletes from the 10 Central League schools can expect to face one another on a regular basis at least through the 1988-89 school year. The PIAA in November ordered the Central League to accept as members four Chester County schools from the Chest-Mont League, which is scheduled to disband in June.
NEWS
February 22, 1988 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
The four Chester County schools scheduled to join the Central League this fall are still waiting for the Central to acknowledge that fact. The school superintendents representing the 10 Central League high schools met Friday to discuss their options and the four Ches-Mont League schools were expected to hear the results of that meeting by tomorrow. The Central League has opposed the merger, mandated by the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association, for reasons relating to the length of travel for road trips to the Chester County schools.
SPORTS
December 12, 2002 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It looks as if the Public League will go it alone. One day after Catholic League athletic directors said they had no interest in joining the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association - the governing body for most of the state's high school programs - Inter-Academic League officials met yesterday and said that, while they would continue to discuss the possibility of joining, no decision had been made. Still, it looks like a long shot. "At this point we have no plans to join," said Inter-Ac president Stan Parker, who also is the athletic director at Chestnut Hill Academy.
SPORTS
November 19, 1987 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
To create athletic schedules for the four remaining members of the Ches- Mont League, the District 1 committee has decided to realign some leagues. James Gallagher, District 1 chairman, said yesterday that Coatesville, Downingtown, West Chester East and West Chester Henderson would be placed in a league made up of a collection of schools from the Central League, the Pioneer Athletic Conference, the Del-Val League and the Southern Chester County League. Gallagher did not say what schools would be affected but said the realignment, which is expected to be completed sometime today, would be made on the basis of school enrollment.
NEWS
October 16, 1996 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
Did you know that women are not considered good enough to officiate boys' basketball games? Or that women aren't considered fast enough or strong enough to do the job? That's what one woman basketball official is charging in a discrimination lawsuit against the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association and a group of Delaware County schools. Noreen P. Kemether, a basketball official with eight years experience, said men officials are assigned twice as many games as women.
NEWS
March 6, 1989 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Ted Woolery of Strath Haven was not distracted by the shaved heads of his fellow competitors. He had one thing in mind - winning the 100- yard breaststroke at the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA) Swimming and Diving Championships at Penn State Saturday. With a powerful dive and a long pull-out, Woolery took a slight lead from the start. In less than a minute, 57.26, he outdistanced his opponents. Moments later, he climbed atop a four-foot stand to accept the gold medal.
SPORTS
June 1, 2006 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
According to Bob Ruoff, executive secretary of District 1, boys' lacrosse is likely to become a sport sponsored by the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association. Last week, a proposal was made by District 3 officials at a PIAA meeting in Shippensburg. There were no votes against district playoffs in boys' lacrosse - an opportunity already accorded girls' lacrosse teams. "I think the time has come for it," Ruoff said. "Lacrosse is growing in numbers and popularity every year.
SPORTS
March 6, 1993 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The School District of Philadelphia this spring will explore the possibility of joining the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association, the organization under which almost every state high school outside Philadelphia competes. Philadelphia is one of the few major cities whose high school athletes never compete for state titles. The Public League was formed around 1913, the PIAA in 1920, and the two have never come together since. That is why, for instance, Simon Gratz's basketball team - the city champion and perhaps even the consensus national champion - will be idle this month as teams from around Pennsylvania play to decide the "state champion.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The increasing number of boys playing on girls' high school teams has altered the competitive balance of some sports, according to recent court filings by the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association. But this week, a Commonwealth Court judge declined to modify a 38-year-old injunction that barred the PIAA from engaging in gender discrimination. Instead, Judge B. Kevin Brobson said if the PIAA wanted to ban boys from participating in girls' sports and vice versa, it should establish such a policy.
NEWS
January 18, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George M. Myers, 91, of Malvern, a retired teacher and sports official for 50 years, died Jan. 6 at home. In 1979, Mr. Myers retired as a basketball referee for the National Collegiate Athletic Association. He had also worked as a high school football official for the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA). His daughter, Rosie Silva, said her father began officiating at high school games as a teenager. A semipro baseball player, Myers became an official because his paid position disqualified him from playing on his high school and college teams, and he wanted to stay involved, Silva said.
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NEWS
January 3, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA & DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writers vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN THE minutes before tipoff yesterday afternoon, Benjamin Franklin High School's gym was filled with the usual sounds of high school basketball: sneakers scuffing on hardwood, players shouting, the swish of nets. Then, as if a switch had been flipped, the only sound was the buzz of fluorescent lights. "Thank you all for coming . . . " Dustin Hardy-Moore, the Franklin Electrons' assistant coach, said as he stood at halfcourt. "This is a struggle for all of us, but we will go through it as one. " At Hardy-Moore's feet was the jersey worn by Quahdir Devine, the player to whom yesterday's moment of silence - and, Hardy-Moore later said, the rest of the season - was dedicated.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
One player stood out during Conestoga High School field hockey practice last week. Quick-footed. Exceptionally skilled. The tallest player on the team. And male. Olivier Everts, 15, has been playing field hockey since he was 6, and the native of the Netherlands said that when he moved to the United States about three years ago, he had no intention of giving it up. So Everts, now a junior, has suited up for Conestoga since his freshman year, donning the same uniform as the girls, kilt and all. For the last two seasons, his coaches say, he's been the team's leading scorer.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The increasing number of boys playing on girls' high school teams has altered the competitive balance of some sports, according to recent court filings by the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association. But this week, a Commonwealth Court judge declined to modify a 38-year-old injunction that barred the PIAA from engaging in gender discrimination. Instead, Judge B. Kevin Brobson said if the PIAA wanted to ban boys from participating in girls' sports and vice versa, it should establish such a policy.
SPORTS
August 31, 2007 | By Chris Goldberg FOR THE INQUIRER
There are at least 120 reasons why the Inter-Academic League has decided, for now, to resist the temptation of joining the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association. During the spring, headmasters and athletic directors of the Inter-Ac met with PIAA officials to gather information about the possibility of joining the PIAA. Last year, the PIAA accepted the Catholic League and three years ago the Public League entered the PIAA. But the Inter-Ac decided it was happy, for now, to remain independent and maintain its long-standing rivalries and traditions while keeping its options open for the future.
SPORTS
December 12, 2006 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, the question lingered: When will the Philadelphia Catholic League teams be able to compete for a state title? Yesterday, that question was finally answered. Bishop Joseph McFadden, who heads Catholic Education for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, announced at a news conference that the 17 Catholic League schools under the jurisdiction of the Archdiocese will petition to join the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association by July 1. During its first year of membership, the Catholic League will transition into the PIAA - abiding by its rules - but will not participate in the state playoffs.
SPORTS
December 9, 2006 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Catholic League will officially announce its intentions to join the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association on Monday. The news conference, set for 10 a.m., will declare what has been reported since last month. The Catholic League will no longer function on its own but will become a part of the state-run PIAA. The Catholic League will petition the PIAA to join District 12, which comprises Philadelphia Public League schools. The School District of Philadelphia will host the joint news conference, which will include officials from the school district and the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.
SPORTS
December 1, 2006 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
While no one is quite ready to confirm it, expectations are that the Catholic League will soon officially announce its entrance into the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association, and become playoff eligible for the 2008-09 school year. When it comes to basketball, many of the league's coaches are leery about joining the PIAA. How will it affect the current Catholic League playoff system? How will recruiting be policed? Will the Catholic League be paired with the Public League in District 12?
SPORTS
November 26, 2006 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Details are being ironed out as the Catholic League prepares to announce its entrance into the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association. According to multiple sources, the Catholic League will join the PIAA in July 2007, with its first year of membership a transition period. During that time, the Catholic League will align its sports seasons with the PIAA, reconfigure its playoff formats, and smooth out any unsettled issues. They will not participate in the PIAA playoffs until the 2008-09 school year, when they are full members.
SPORTS
November 7, 2006 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Catholic League is set to join the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association, according to PIAA and league sources, and will make an announcement on the move before Christmas. According to one source, the league will enter as a member of District 12, which is made up of Philadelphia's Public League schools. The move could come as early as the next school year, according to the source. However, the Public League has a provision in its contract with the PIAA that prevents any non-Public school from joining District 12 until July 2008.
SPORTS
August 31, 2006 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The numbers don't lie: Steroid use among high school students ranges from 4.0 to 6.1 percent. The numbers are from the last three National Youth Risk Behavioral Surveys conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a federally funded organization located in Atlanta. And if a child plays a sport, those percentages increase. The every-two-year survey, last published in 2005, accounts for use as rare as one time. But unlike more common recreational drugs - such as marijuana or cocaine - steroids aren't taken arbitrarily but cyclically.
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