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NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - OMG. No more texting while driving in Pennsylvania? Indeed. Under a new law that takes effect Thursday, drivers will risk fines if they send text messages from behind the wheel. No reading or sending of e-mails and no Web surfing either. But drivers will still be permitted to talk on their handheld phones, which police say will make enforcement tougher. "The Pennsylvania State Police anticipate the law will educate law-abiding citizens on the dangers of texting and driving and will hopefully create voluntary compliance by the majority of motorists," said Maria Finn, a State Police spokeswoman.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - The state legislature has put the kibosh on round-the-clock work schedules for child stars of reality shows. Call it the Jon & Kate Plus 8 law. Under a bill approved Tuesday and expected to soon be signed by Gov. Corbett, production companies must extend the same protections to child actors who appear in reality shows as those given on the sets of movies and other television programs. "This is a major victory for the state's children," said the bill's lead sponsor, Rep. Thomas Murt (R., Montgomery)
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Mike Macagnone, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - They are the little dramas that accompany big rains. Last September, first responders pulled drivers out of rising floodwaters more than three dozen times in Upper Dublin Township alone. Paul Leonard, the township's manager and a firefighter himself, said his department frequently has to go into the water to retrieve drivers who ignore signs for flooded roads. Responders risk needing to be saved themselves, as happened to a boatload of rescuers in Upper Moreland after flooding caused by Hurricane Irene last September.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Natural gas drilling near homes, wastewater pits near schools, and pipelines running through parks are all allowed under the controversial Marcellus Shale drilling law that took effect Monday. Communities will have little control over such operations, opponents say, because the Pennsylvania law trumps local ordinances that limit where they can be put. Proponents say Act 13 ensures that drillers get equal treatment; opponents say it provides them with special treatment. The provision of the law that supersedes local zoning laws "is an assault on an important democratic principal - the right to self governing," says Karl Schwartz, director of the Gallows Run Watershed Association.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
When her daughter Kelly joined the field hockey team at New Hope-Solebury High School in 2006, Chris Flynn noticed the field. The surface was dirt and dead grass. No restrooms, no scoreboard, no place to sit. A few hundred yards away stood the boys' gleaming stadium field, with lighting, bleachers, restrooms, even a concession stand. Flynn did not understand why girls' teams couldn't use that field, especially when there were no scheduling conflicts and it sat empty. That started her on a six-year struggle to level the playing field for girl athletes.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Bill Cosby says jurors at his coming sex-assault trial in Montgomery County should not be allowed to hear a recording of a phone call he made to his accuser's mother after the alleged attack. In a suppression motion filed Wednesday, Cosby's lawyers contend that Andrea Constand's mother illegally recorded the 2005 phone call because the entertainer did not know it was being taped. His lawyers say he placed the call from his home in Cheltenham. Pennsylvania law requires consent of both parties to record a conversation.
NEWS
August 12, 2016
Both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders tapped a strong current of dissatisfaction with the two-party system that has long dominated American politics. While making surprisingly strong showings in primaries and caucuses, they made legitimate complaints about the convoluted process used to pick presidential nominees. The process is mystifying thanks to arcane rules that favor more traditional party candidates. In many states, primaries give voters some degree of say in the process. But many primaries, including Pennsylvania's, are closed to independents, even though their tax dollars help subsidize the two major parties' way of choosing candidates.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
When the 1849 Gold Rush hit, it wasn't the miners who got rich. The businessmen who sold blue jeans and pickaxes amassed the real fortunes. When Gov. Wolf signed a medical marijuana bill into law on April 17, Pennsylvania became the 24th state to legalize medical cannabis. In Old City on Saturday, about 300 entrepreneurs and venture capitalists gathered at the Chemical Heritage Foundation for what was billed as the "Innovation in the Cannabis Industry" conference. There were heady predictions - euphoric estimates of how large the marijuana industry could grow and the many opportunities for profits it might bring.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Should local governments and school districts, unlike individual citizens and businesses, enjoy limited immunity from lawsuits? That is the question to be argued Tuesday before the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in Harrisburg, where a prominent Philadelphia plaintiffs law firm is to square off against lawyers for the Pennsbury School District in Bucks County. A Bucks County Court jury slapped the district with a $14 million verdict in 2011 in the case of a former high school student run over by one of its buses.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Bill O'Boyle, The Times Leader MCT REGIONAL NEWS
All Natalie Gunshannon wanted was to be paid a fair wage for her work, she said. Gunshannon, 27, of Dallas Township, worked at McDonald's Restaurant on the Dallas Highway from April 24 to May 15. When she received her first paycheck, enclosed was a Chase Bank debit card with instructions on how to use it and the fees attached. Her future earnings would be deposited into the debit card account and she could access her money from there. Gunshannon never signed the card and when she returned to work she asked her supervisor if she could be paid by check or by direct deposit.
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NEWS
August 12, 2016
Both Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders tapped a strong current of dissatisfaction with the two-party system that has long dominated American politics. While making surprisingly strong showings in primaries and caucuses, they made legitimate complaints about the convoluted process used to pick presidential nominees. The process is mystifying thanks to arcane rules that favor more traditional party candidates. In many states, primaries give voters some degree of say in the process. But many primaries, including Pennsylvania's, are closed to independents, even though their tax dollars help subsidize the two major parties' way of choosing candidates.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Bill Cosby says jurors at his coming sex-assault trial in Montgomery County should not be allowed to hear a recording of a phone call he made to his accuser's mother after the alleged attack. In a suppression motion filed Wednesday, Cosby's lawyers contend that Andrea Constand's mother illegally recorded the 2005 phone call because the entertainer did not know it was being taped. His lawyers say he placed the call from his home in Cheltenham. Pennsylvania law requires consent of both parties to record a conversation.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Standing with others who had been abused by Catholic clergy, State Rep. Mark Rozzi hurled stacks of grand jury reports onto the steps of the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul on Monday, and loudly vowed to continue trying to change Pennsylvania law so victims like himself can file suit in decades-old cases. Stoking a legislative fight over the civil statute of limitations, the Berks County Democrat pledged to rewrite a pending House bill to include a two-year window in which any adult of any age could sue private institutions and individuals for abuse that occurred when they were children.
NEWS
June 1, 2016
ISSUE | ID THEFT PennDot within law For decades, Pennsylvania law has permitted access to drivers' records by certain entities strictly for lawful purposes, such as vehicle insurance, credit, jobs, and safety checks of drivers who operate school buses and heavy trucks ("ID theft taken too lightly," May 24). Applicants for insurance, jobs, and credit authorize access to their records. Similar programs are in place in many other states. When a state Budget Office audit found problems with one data aggregator with authorized access, the state Department of Transportation cut off its access.
NEWS
May 12, 2016
By Milad Emam For the past six years, Elizabeth Young has been living an American nightmare. Philadelphia police officers showed up at her house and tried to seize her home and car because her son sold $90 worth of marijuana outside her home. Young was never charged with a crime, yet she was soon caught up in Philadelphia's civil-forfeiture machine. With the deck stacked against her, Young went to Philadelphia's criminal justice center and fought to get her property back, arguing that she was an innocent owner because she did not know her son was dealing drugs, having been hospitalized during that time.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
When the 1849 Gold Rush hit, it wasn't the miners who got rich. The businessmen who sold blue jeans and pickaxes amassed the real fortunes. When Gov. Wolf signed a medical marijuana bill into law on April 17, Pennsylvania became the 24th state to legalize medical cannabis. In Old City on Saturday, about 300 entrepreneurs and venture capitalists gathered at the Chemical Heritage Foundation for what was billed as the "Innovation in the Cannabis Industry" conference. There were heady predictions - euphoric estimates of how large the marijuana industry could grow and the many opportunities for profits it might bring.
NEWS
April 6, 2016
By Sue A. Fugate The thought of child sexual abuse stirs emotions of fear and anger in me as a mother of two. The more I hear about this problem, the more troubled I am at its prevalence and the lack of consistency among institutions and governments trying to deal with it. The recent grand jury report about crimes that date back as far as the 1950s in the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown is the latest revelation. I won't pretend to know the pain survivors of abuse experience or the helplessness their families feel, but I do empathize with their suffering and support their need for healing.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By John Baer
IT REALLY makes you wonder. It makes you want to look into the dull, shortsighted eyes of our lackluster lawmakers and ask, "What exactly is wrong with you?" I'm not talking about heavy lifting on taxing and spending or budgets and pensions. We all know how weak they are in those areas. I'm talking about simple, common-sense stuff to save lives. For example, Pennsylvania is among a minority of states with lousy DUI laws, and repeatedly fails to adopt a law proven to reduce the mayhem that drunken driving causes.
NEWS
February 25, 2016
After a long illness, Harry Jay Katz died peacefully early Tuesday. He was 75. This is a remembrance. He was generous to a fault, sometimes to the wrong people, capable of the grand gesture and the petty feud. Harry Jay Katz stood above the crowd, sometimes to look down on them, sometimes to lend a helping hand, usually in the form of cash. He was dashing, durable, and diplomatic, and for a half-century he lived in the limelight and spun stories like a spider. In the old days, they would have called him a raconteur.
NEWS
February 1, 2016
For Immediate Release February 17, 2005 Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce L. Castor, Jr. has announced that a joint investigation by his office and the Cheltenham Township Police Department into allegations against actor and comic Bill Cosby is concluded. Cosby maintains a residence in Cheltenham Township, Montgomery County. A 31 year old female, a former employee of the Athletic Department of Temple University complained to detectives that Cosby touched her inappropriately during a visit to his home in January of 2004.
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