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Pennsylvania Medical Society

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NEWS
March 15, 1986
Carol Nelson Shepherd, vice president of the Philadelphia Trial Lawyers Association, in a Letter to the Editor, asserts that malpractice fees in Pennsylvania are not that high. She offers the solution to require physicians in less risky fields of medicine to help underwrite the costs of insuring their colleagues in the higher-risk specialities. This will not solve the existing crisis and it is totally unacceptable to physicians practicing less risky medicine, who also have lower earnings than their high-risk confreres.
NEWS
March 13, 2000 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
More than 500 nurses were expected at the capitol building in Harrisburg today to support a bill that would make Pennsylvania one of the last states in the country to give qualified nurses the authority to write prescriptions. A significant percentage of nurses who possess a master's degree, or the equivalent, become the sole source of health care for many patients, especially those in traditionally under-served populations. But in order to prescribe medication, current regulations require the nurses to go through a physician.
NEWS
February 14, 1997 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Doctors in Delaware and Montgomery Counties angry over the soaring rates they must pay to a state medical-liability fund squared off Wednesday night against representatives of the fund and the Pennsylvania Medical Society. "A lot of us have never been sued, yet we are bearing the rates of those who have been sued. It's an unfair situation," Lisa Linder, a Newtown Square ophthalmologist, told the two representatives. Linder is secretary of the 750-member Delaware County Medical Society, which organized Wednesday's session at the Radnor Hotel.
NEWS
August 23, 1996 | BY JONATHAN E. RHOADS JR
Cigarette smoking is a filthy, expensive dangerous habit. The 32,000 practicing physicians in our commonwealth deal with people every day who are battling the health effects of nicotine addiction. Nearly all of these people have read the warning on the package that says "Cigarette Smoking May Be Hazardous to Your Health," but they keep on smoking because they are hooked - they are addicted to cigarettes. Which is why the Pennsylvania Medical Society supports the class-action filing of Arch vs. the American Tobacco Company Inc., et al., filed Aug. 8, in the Court of Common Pleas in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
The Delaware County Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a small-business workshop, "Statistical Process Control: Cost Savings and Profit Improvement," from 7 to 9 p.m. Sept. 14. The workshop will focus on the use of statistical methods to improve productivity, employee participation, customer service, vendor support and care in managing inventory and the production process. Presented by Richard H. Rabner & Associates of Wayne, the workshop will address statistical process control, quality attainment programs, communication skills and employee involvement, inventory management and cost reduction and profit enhancement.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry James Rendin Sr., 80, a physician and former medical director of the Fair Acres Geriatric Center in Lima, died of cardiac arrest Monday at his home in Moylan. He also had cancer. Dr. Rendin served as medical director of Fair Acres from 1978 until retiring in 1997. He also had been medical director of the Wallingford Nursing Home for a number of years during the 1980s. He was born in Boston, Pa., graduated from Ohio Northern University in Ada in 1939, and earned his medical degree at Hahnemann University School of Medicine.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A memorial service will be scheduled for next month for Dr. Hasib Tanyol, 83, a retired Fort Washington physician known for his work on the effects of hypertension. He died June 17 of heart failure at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Tanyol, who had maintained a practice in Fort Washington since the mid-1960s, served on the medical staffs of Germantown Hospital in Philadelphia and Montgomery Hospital in Norristown. He previously lived in Lafayette Hill. He was a charter member of the American Society of Hypertension, and he also devoted his career to the study of cirrhosis of the liver.
NEWS
January 30, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Orville Horwitz, 93, of Bryn Mawr, a retired cardiologist and professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, died of peritonitis Tuesday at Mariners Hospital in Tavernier, Fla. He was a resident of Society Hill and Strafford before moving to Bryn Mawr four years ago. In more than 50 years as a physician, Dr. Horwitz worked as a researcher, teacher, author and administrator. He established the Foundation for Vascular-Hypertension Research, taught at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and wrote scores of books and articles about cardiac and vascular diseases.
NEWS
March 19, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jules Lacavaro, 64, chief of the gastroenterology department of Riddle Memorial Hospital, who as a medical student in Italy was a movie extra in spaghetti westerns, died of complications from ulcers Thursday at his home in Newtown Square. In 1975, Dr. Lacavaro joined the staff of Riddle Memorial Hospital in Media, where he maintained a practice and was chief of the gastroenterology department. In addition to his duties at Riddle Memorial, from 1985 to 1995, he was an attending physician at Fair Acres Geriatric Center in Lima.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2003 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Chiropractic Association and the Jefferson University Physicians are the latest groups to recommend that their members opt out of a proposed settlement between Independence Blue Cross and medical professionals in the region. Independence agreed in June to disclose pay policies and pay up to $40 million over the next two years to settle a lawsuit brought by the Pennsylvania Orthopaedic Society. The orthopedists had argued that Independence was failing to pay for all the care that was given.
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NEWS
January 3, 2013
What a top prosecutor calls "the fastest-growing drug problem" in America isn't about dope dealers on a street corner. It starts inside doctors' offices, clinics, hospital emergency rooms, and at pharmacy counters - where painkillers are acquired by prescription. The rampant abuse of addictive drugs such as oxycodone and hydrocodone contributes to an overdose epidemic now viewed by federal health officials as the leading U.S. cause of accidental death, and Pennsylvania is high on the list of problem states.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
Over a span of just a few years, Pennsylvania physician leaders have gone from warning of a declining number of doctors in the state to heralding new data - released last week - that shows their numbers are growing again. The ranks of practicing physicians have grown to nearly 32,000 in recent years, an increase of several thousand, according to the Pennsylvania Medical Society. That should be good news for patients seeking care for everything from the common cold to a chronic ailment.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2010 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sue Shirato is a nurse. And a doctor. But probably not the kind of doctor you think, which makes her introduction to patients at the Jefferson Heart Institute more complicated. "I'm Dr. Shirato, but feel free to call me Sue," she tells patients. "I am Dr. Duffy's advanced-practice nurse. " Shirato, a nurse practitioner, just got her doctor of nursing practice degree at Thomas Jefferson University. Most nurse practitioners still have master's degrees, but nursing schools want the DNP to be the entry-level degree for advanced-practice nurses by 2015.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 2009, the number of new medical-malpractice lawsuits filed in Pennsylvania courts fell for the fifth straight year, according to a report released Tuesday by Pennsylvania Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille. The report provides new evidence that the malpractice climate in Pennsylvania has cooled since the early part of the decade, when rising costs led many doctors and hospital administrators to worry that the state's medical system might collapse. Philadelphia - long considered the center of the state's malpractice crisis because of the large number of generous verdicts here - saw the most dramatic declines in new suits and in large jury awards, as well as a rise in defense verdicts.
NEWS
June 11, 2007 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Seeking to stop a medical brain drain across the state, a state legislator from Montgomery County wants to use state tax dollars to subsidize medical school tuition for aspiring doctors. Rep. Josh Shapiro (D., Montgomery) said last week that state forgiveness of medical school loans could be a powerful incentive to keep young doctors in Pennsylvania and ensure continued access to health care for the state's aging population. Shapiro has sponsored legislation to establish a loan forgiveness program under the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency for doctors who agree to practice in Pennsylvania for at least 10 years.
NEWS
April 7, 2006 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new report by the Pennsylvania Medical Society found that more doctors are working part time and fewer stayed in the state after training here, creating a dynamic some say could ultimately limit patients' access to care. The association, which is a lobbying group representing the state's physicians, compiled the report to get a comprehensive look at the trends and issues affecting the medical community, said Daniel Glunk, chairman of the group's board of trustees and a doctor of internal medicine in Williamsport, Pa. Health-care services made up about 14 percent of all the nongovernmental jobs in the state, slightly higher than average.
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lila Stein Kroser, 72, of Boothwyn, president of the Pennsylvania Medical Society, died Wednesday at Temple University Hospital of ovarian cancer. Dr. Kroser was inaugurated as the Pennsylvania Medical Society president on Oct 15. Three days later, in an interview with a reporter, she expressed the society's concern that some doctors were not getting all the doses of flu vaccine they had ordered. "The big problem is the unequal distribution," she said. "Perhaps there needs to be some federal dictates on how this is distributed.
NEWS
July 29, 2005 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some state medical experts say they don't understand why a new federal bill on medical errors - expected to be signed into law within a month - isn't as strong as state law. A bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday asks hospitals and other health organizations to voluntarily report medical errors to a patient safety organization. The information would be entered into a confidential database so analysts could track and address problems. But in 20 states, including Pennsylvania and New Jersey, reporting health-care mistakes is mandatory and will remain so, leaving some to wonder why the federal bill is less stringent.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As the new president of the Pennsylvania Medical Society, William W. Lander, 80, has noticed a definite change in his life: He spends a lot more time on the phone. In his role as spokesman for Pennsylvania doctors, he said, reporters keep him busy answering questions about medical issues such as the flu-vaccine shortage and high malpractice-insurance premiums in the state. The Bryn Mawr physician, who is still running the solo family practice that he started in 1953, said his new position also involves a lot of administrative duties.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
Remember the intense effort in Harrisburg earlier this year to approve a constitutional change that would allow caps on medical malpractice awards? Lately the push has gotten all tangled up in state House committee tussles that defy human understanding. As a result, malpractice caps - an issue that has provoked years of warfare among Pennsylvania's doctors and lawyers, Republicans and Democrats - may go nowhere this year. That would be too bad. It's time Pennsylvania put this divisive issue behind it. Voters should get the chance to say whether they favor caps for court awards in malpractice cases.
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