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Pennsylvania State University

NEWS
March 13, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barbara Feick Daniel, 63, of Wilmington, a Delaware County college teacher and administrator, died of breast cancer March 4 at the home of a family friend in Swarthmore. Since 1999, Mrs. Daniel had been the assistant director of academic affairs at the Brandywine campus of Pennsylvania State University in Middletown. Born in Philadelphia, Mrs. Daniel was a 1963 graduate of Abington Senior High School and earned a bachelor's degree in English from Immaculata College in 1967.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John Vairo knew he was in for a challenge when he left State College, Pa., for Chester to lay the groundwork for the Pennsylvania State University Delaware County campus. The temporary facilities were certainly not ideal: a former fish market at Sixth and Penn Streets, with a roller-skating rink on the second floor and trains rumbling by outside. The expected enrollment was 36 students, with seven faculty members. But when the doors opened in 1967, there were 230 students.
NEWS
March 7, 1988 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
A funny thing happened to Kim Steel at last year's YMCA National Swimming Championships in Orlando, Fla. She began to take swimming seriously. That is not to say that Steel, who finished eighth in the 500 freestyle and ninth in the 1,650 freestyle at nationals, was not serious about her sport before. But, she said, the national experience transformed her. "It built my confidence a lot," Steel said. "I'm more mentally tough now. Last year, I had problems keeping my head on straight.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jane E. Cooper, 62, a much-honored associate professor of biology at the Delaware County campus of Pennsylvania State University, died Friday at Brinton Manor Nursing Home in Glen Mills. She had cancer, which was diagnosed in the early 1970s. Dr. Cooper was one of the first seven faculty members hired at Penn State-Delaware County when it opened in Chester in 1967. The school later moved to Lima, and she taught there until she became too ill last year. She continued other campus-related activities until March.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeanne R. Koller, 79, of Roxborough, the first African American teacher at Ardmore Avenue Elementary School in Lower Merion, who went on to a long teaching career in Philadelphia, died Sunday, Sept. 14, of pancreatic cancer at her home. Mrs. Koller started out at Ardmore Avenue, where the township's minority children once comprised 80 percent of students. When the building was razed in the 1960s, black children joined white students in Lower Merion elementary schools for the first time.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HOWARD ARNOLD might have trod the hallowed halls of the University of Pennsylvania as a teacher and administrator for 31 years, but his consciousness of the plight of suffering people was always at street level. He knew about the ravages of poverty, ignorance and violence, especially in the African-American community because his hands were always in it, trying to make it better. As a social worker, Howard Arnold was possessed of a natural gift for identifying with people on the short end of society, and a talent for helping them rise above their situations.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | By State Rep. John Lawless
In early December 2000, I received a letter from a young man attending Pennsylvania State University. He wrote, "I wanted to make you aware of a student event held at the University Park Campus of Penn State on the evening of Nov. 18. Enclosed is an advertisement flyer showing the details of the event. I think it is a safe assumption that many taxpayers in your district, as well as throughout the Commonwealth, would find this event to be inappropriate. "The flyer announced a festival with a name more likely to be found in a XXX-rated magazine than The Philadelphia Inquirer.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2013
In the Region DEP radiation study detailed The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Wednesday released detailed plans for its comprehensive radiation study of oil and gas development and said it intends to begin sampling this month. The agency plans to analyze radioactivity levels of flowback waters, treatment solids, drill cuttings, and drilling equipment, along with the transportation, storage, and disposal of drilling wastes. DEP says current data do not indicate any health risks, but activists have raised concerns about naturally occurring radioactivity in materials extracted from the mile-deep wells.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writers
The 61-year-old mother of a bond trader killed in the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center said she feared she would go to her grave before Osama bin Laden did. "Justice really has been served," Judith Reiss of Yardley said. "There's a special place waiting in hell for this man. " Reiss said she and her husband, Gary, whose 23-year-old son, Joshua, died that September day in 2001, feared that the mission to kill bin Laden had fallen off the front burner. "We're joyous," Gary Reiss said.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Less than a week ago, Graham B. Spanier was in line to become the second-longest-serving president in Pennsylvania State University's 156-year history. Bolstered by healthy fund-raising, enrollment growth, and an array of new programs and initiatives - all on top of one of the nation's seemingly most pristine and successful football programs - Penn State appeared to be stronger than ever under Spanier's leadership. He was supposed to be feted Wednesday at the 35th annual Renaissance Fund dinner.
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