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NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a time of life normally suffused with hope and energy, 22-year-old Evelyn De Jesus has little to be optimistic about. The 2008 graduate of Mastbaum Vocational/Technical School did a year at Pennsylvania State University but could not afford it and dropped out. Once dreaming of becoming a lawyer, De Jesus - who lives in North Philadelphia with her unemployed boyfriend and 2-year-old son - now earns poverty wages of $10 an hour at a...
NEWS
March 7, 1988 | By Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
A funny thing happened to Kim Steel at last year's YMCA National Swimming Championships in Orlando, Fla. She began to take swimming seriously. That is not to say that Steel, who finished eighth in the 500 freestyle and ninth in the 1,650 freestyle at nationals, was not serious about her sport before. But, she said, the national experience transformed her. "It built my confidence a lot," Steel said. "I'm more mentally tough now. Last year, I had problems keeping my head on straight.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jane E. Cooper, 62, a much-honored associate professor of biology at the Delaware County campus of Pennsylvania State University, died Friday at Brinton Manor Nursing Home in Glen Mills. She had cancer, which was diagnosed in the early 1970s. Dr. Cooper was one of the first seven faculty members hired at Penn State-Delaware County when it opened in Chester in 1967. The school later moved to Lima, and she taught there until she became too ill last year. She continued other campus-related activities until March.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HOWARD ARNOLD might have trod the hallowed halls of the University of Pennsylvania as a teacher and administrator for 31 years, but his consciousness of the plight of suffering people was always at street level. He knew about the ravages of poverty, ignorance and violence, especially in the African-American community because his hands were always in it, trying to make it better. As a social worker, Howard Arnold was possessed of a natural gift for identifying with people on the short end of society, and a talent for helping them rise above their situations.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeanne R. Koller, 79, of Roxborough, the first African American teacher at Ardmore Avenue Elementary School in Lower Merion, who went on to a long teaching career in Philadelphia, died Sunday, Sept. 14, of pancreatic cancer at her home. Mrs. Koller started out at Ardmore Avenue, where the township's minority children once comprised 80 percent of students. When the building was razed in the 1960s, black children joined white students in Lower Merion elementary schools for the first time.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | By State Rep. John Lawless
In early December 2000, I received a letter from a young man attending Pennsylvania State University. He wrote, "I wanted to make you aware of a student event held at the University Park Campus of Penn State on the evening of Nov. 18. Enclosed is an advertisement flyer showing the details of the event. I think it is a safe assumption that many taxpayers in your district, as well as throughout the Commonwealth, would find this event to be inappropriate. "The flyer announced a festival with a name more likely to be found in a XXX-rated magazine than The Philadelphia Inquirer.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2013
In the Region DEP radiation study detailed The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection on Wednesday released detailed plans for its comprehensive radiation study of oil and gas development and said it intends to begin sampling this month. The agency plans to analyze radioactivity levels of flowback waters, treatment solids, drill cuttings, and drilling equipment, along with the transportation, storage, and disposal of drilling wastes. DEP says current data do not indicate any health risks, but activists have raised concerns about naturally occurring radioactivity in materials extracted from the mile-deep wells.
NEWS
May 2, 2011 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writers
The 61-year-old mother of a bond trader killed in the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center said she feared she would go to her grave before Osama bin Laden did. "Justice really has been served," Judith Reiss of Yardley said. "There's a special place waiting in hell for this man. " Reiss said she and her husband, Gary, whose 23-year-old son, Joshua, died that September day in 2001, feared that the mission to kill bin Laden had fallen off the front burner. "We're joyous," Gary Reiss said.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Less than a week ago, Graham B. Spanier was in line to become the second-longest-serving president in Pennsylvania State University's 156-year history. Bolstered by healthy fund-raising, enrollment growth, and an array of new programs and initiatives - all on top of one of the nation's seemingly most pristine and successful football programs - Penn State appeared to be stronger than ever under Spanier's leadership. He was supposed to be feted Wednesday at the 35th annual Renaissance Fund dinner.
NEWS
April 17, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Villanova University sophomore Alison Flukes sat in a campus cafe discussing the presidential election with a friend while waiting to hear Chelsea Clinton talk. The debate covered national security, health care, and which television station they preferred for campaign news, Fox or CNN. The friends said such conversations were common on campus these days. "Saturday night at a frat party, it's probably not going to come up, but in class and with our friends this is what we talk about," said Flukes, 20, a political-science major from Weymouth, Mass.
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