CollectionsPenny Chenery
IN THE NEWS

Penny Chenery

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011
LOOKS LIKE old-timers week on the DVD front, with the fogy-comedy "Red" and the nostalgia-themed "Secretariat" and "Nowhere Boy. " "RED" stands for Retired, Extremely Dangerous, adjectives that describe former networkers for American, British and Soviet intelligence (Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, Brian Cox), now allied to fight high-level corruption in the United States. The action is pretty standard, but it's a good cast, and they have fun with it. "Secretariat" is an exceedingly wholesome (by Randall Wallace)
SPORTS
June 21, 2012
Secretariat's winning time in the 1973 Preakness has been changed to reflect that the Triple Crown-winning colt's time was actually faster than the stakes record. The Maryland Racing Commission voted, 7-0, on Tuesday in a special hearing at Laurel Park to change the official time of the race from 1 minute, 542/5 seconds to 1:53. That gives Secretariat records in each of his three Triple Crown races - the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes - that still stand. The commission investigated the official timing of the Preakness at the request of Secretariat's 90-year-old owner, Penny Chenery, and Pimlico president Tom Chuckas.
NEWS
October 7, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
There are those who'll look forward to "Secretariat" because they like family movies, or sports movies, or horses or thoroughbred racing. I looked forward to it because I like Diane Lane, but about halfway through "Secretariat," I realized that as much as I like her, I really don't like watching her run a horse farm. I prefer her under a Tuscan sun, and being unfaithful, in something contemporary and sexy that reminds us why she's unique - Lane has reversed the Hollywood trajectory and become more beautiful and relatable with age. In a youth-obsessed industry that's led many of her colleagues to have their faces stretched and lips inflated, Lane chooses to wear her age and experience, and it's given her a unique combination of gravity and vulnerability.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Secretariat , an equine Chariots of Fire , is the true-life tale of the mighty chestnut stallion known to intimates as Big Red. The makers of Secretariat present him as a sacred figure, born in a stable and destined to inspire men. Like the horse in the Book of Job, Big Red swallows the ground with fierceness and rage. And in this movie with a gospel-inflected score ("Oh Happy Day"), when the horse meets the bottomless gaze of his owner, the chestnut returns it with peace and infinite patience.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010
MY TIME in the makeup and costume trailers over, I was told to head toward the "Secretariat" movie set, the tunnel underneath the grandstand at historic Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Ky. It was a year ago, a perfect fall morning. They were setting up a shot of a news conference before the 1973 Belmont Stakes. The connections of Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Secretariat were to be there, along with the people behind Derby and Preakness runner-up Sham. Actually, the real people weren't there.
SPORTS
May 28, 2004 | By STAN HOCHMAN For the Daily News
Ron Turcotte thinks Smarty Jones is 35 lengths better than the horses he will face a week from tomorrow in the Belmont Stakes. He knows it will anger some people to hear him talk that way because he was the jockey on Secretariat when the big red horse demolished the Belmont field and won by 31 lengths. "I'm not comparing Smarty Jones with Secretariat," Turcotte said, during a 95-minute teleconference involving riders and owners of Secretariat, Seattle Slew and Affirmed, all of them Triple Crown winners.
SPORTS
June 20, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
A JUDGE HAS sentenced former Auburn wide receiver Antonio Goodwin to 15 years in prison for an armed home-invasion robbery that also resulted in charges against three teammates from the 2010 national championship team. Lee County Circuit Court Judge Christopher Hughes imposed the sentence Tuesday in Opelika, Ala., while Goodwin, 21, stood silently with arms behind his back. "I want to apologize for my action and my poor judgment," Goodwin said before the sentencing. "In the time I was at home, I had time to think about it and I've become a better person and a better decision-maker.
SPORTS
June 5, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Since Affirmed won the last Triple Crown in 1978, six horses, six jockeys, five owners and five trainers came to Belmont Park with a chance. Talk to the people around those horses and they all tell you the same thing. The three weeks between the Preakness and Belmont Stakes are forever. And, after it's over, the feeling of something lost is really forever. None of them won it. Owners Bob and Beverly Lewis get a second chance today. Trainer Bob Baffert got his second chance last year.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Bill Lyon, Inquirer Sports Columnist
The memory is frozen: Jockey Ron Turcotte, perched atop that swelling tidal wave of a back, is crossing the finish line aboard Secretariat in the 1973 Belmont and he is looking back in disbelief, his eyes wide, asking the question that is stuck in countless screaming throats: Where is everyone else? The answer: Way, way, way back. Beaten. No, not just beaten, destroyed. Crushed. Mere dots in Big Red's rear-view mirror. It was as if he were running in an entirely separate race.
SPORTS
June 13, 2012
Penny Chenery , the owner of Secretariat , has asked the Maryland Racing Commission to conduct a hearing about changing the time of the Triple Crown horse's winning run in the 1973 Preakness Stakes. The Preakness was the only Triple Crown race in which Secretariat didn't establish a track record. Chenery, along with Maryland Jockey Club president Tom Chuckas , says advances in modern video technology will prove Secretariat ran the 13/16-mile race in 1 minute, 532/5 seconds.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 21, 2012
Secretariat's winning time in the 1973 Preakness has been changed to reflect that the Triple Crown-winning colt's time was actually faster than the stakes record. The Maryland Racing Commission voted, 7-0, on Tuesday in a special hearing at Laurel Park to change the official time of the race from 1 minute, 542/5 seconds to 1:53. That gives Secretariat records in each of his three Triple Crown races - the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes - that still stand. The commission investigated the official timing of the Preakness at the request of Secretariat's 90-year-old owner, Penny Chenery, and Pimlico president Tom Chuckas.
SPORTS
June 20, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
A JUDGE HAS sentenced former Auburn wide receiver Antonio Goodwin to 15 years in prison for an armed home-invasion robbery that also resulted in charges against three teammates from the 2010 national championship team. Lee County Circuit Court Judge Christopher Hughes imposed the sentence Tuesday in Opelika, Ala., while Goodwin, 21, stood silently with arms behind his back. "I want to apologize for my action and my poor judgment," Goodwin said before the sentencing. "In the time I was at home, I had time to think about it and I've become a better person and a better decision-maker.
SPORTS
June 13, 2012
Penny Chenery , the owner of Secretariat , has asked the Maryland Racing Commission to conduct a hearing about changing the time of the Triple Crown horse's winning run in the 1973 Preakness Stakes. The Preakness was the only Triple Crown race in which Secretariat didn't establish a track record. Chenery, along with Maryland Jockey Club president Tom Chuckas , says advances in modern video technology will prove Secretariat ran the 13/16-mile race in 1 minute, 532/5 seconds.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011
LOOKS LIKE old-timers week on the DVD front, with the fogy-comedy "Red" and the nostalgia-themed "Secretariat" and "Nowhere Boy. " "RED" stands for Retired, Extremely Dangerous, adjectives that describe former networkers for American, British and Soviet intelligence (Bruce Willis, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, Brian Cox), now allied to fight high-level corruption in the United States. The action is pretty standard, but it's a good cast, and they have fun with it. "Secretariat" is an exceedingly wholesome (by Randall Wallace)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010
MY TIME in the makeup and costume trailers over, I was told to head toward the "Secretariat" movie set, the tunnel underneath the grandstand at historic Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Ky. It was a year ago, a perfect fall morning. They were setting up a shot of a news conference before the 1973 Belmont Stakes. The connections of Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Secretariat were to be there, along with the people behind Derby and Preakness runner-up Sham. Actually, the real people weren't there.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Secretariat , an equine Chariots of Fire , is the true-life tale of the mighty chestnut stallion known to intimates as Big Red. The makers of Secretariat present him as a sacred figure, born in a stable and destined to inspire men. Like the horse in the Book of Job, Big Red swallows the ground with fierceness and rage. And in this movie with a gospel-inflected score ("Oh Happy Day"), when the horse meets the bottomless gaze of his owner, the chestnut returns it with peace and infinite patience.
NEWS
October 7, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
There are those who'll look forward to "Secretariat" because they like family movies, or sports movies, or horses or thoroughbred racing. I looked forward to it because I like Diane Lane, but about halfway through "Secretariat," I realized that as much as I like her, I really don't like watching her run a horse farm. I prefer her under a Tuscan sun, and being unfaithful, in something contemporary and sexy that reminds us why she's unique - Lane has reversed the Hollywood trajectory and become more beautiful and relatable with age. In a youth-obsessed industry that's led many of her colleagues to have their faces stretched and lips inflated, Lane chooses to wear her age and experience, and it's given her a unique combination of gravity and vulnerability.
SPORTS
May 28, 2004 | By STAN HOCHMAN For the Daily News
Ron Turcotte thinks Smarty Jones is 35 lengths better than the horses he will face a week from tomorrow in the Belmont Stakes. He knows it will anger some people to hear him talk that way because he was the jockey on Secretariat when the big red horse demolished the Belmont field and won by 31 lengths. "I'm not comparing Smarty Jones with Secretariat," Turcotte said, during a 95-minute teleconference involving riders and owners of Secretariat, Seattle Slew and Affirmed, all of them Triple Crown winners.
SPORTS
June 5, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Since Affirmed won the last Triple Crown in 1978, six horses, six jockeys, five owners and five trainers came to Belmont Park with a chance. Talk to the people around those horses and they all tell you the same thing. The three weeks between the Preakness and Belmont Stakes are forever. And, after it's over, the feeling of something lost is really forever. None of them won it. Owners Bob and Beverly Lewis get a second chance today. Trainer Bob Baffert got his second chance last year.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | By Bill Lyon, Inquirer Sports Columnist
The memory is frozen: Jockey Ron Turcotte, perched atop that swelling tidal wave of a back, is crossing the finish line aboard Secretariat in the 1973 Belmont and he is looking back in disbelief, his eyes wide, asking the question that is stuck in countless screaming throats: Where is everyone else? The answer: Way, way, way back. Beaten. No, not just beaten, destroyed. Crushed. Mere dots in Big Red's rear-view mirror. It was as if he were running in an entirely separate race.
|
|
|
|
|