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Pension Credits

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NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Joyce, the Delaware River Port Authority executive who resigned this week after allegations of E-ZPass abuse, improperly received pension credits last year for a part-time, $67,356 solicitor's job in Pennsauken. Records show he also received pension credits to which he was not entitled in 2008 for a second, $18,200 solicitor position with the Pennsauken Sewerage Authority. The errors boosted the Camden County Democrat's total pensionable salary in 2008 and 2009 to the highest levels of his 26 years in the system.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Division of Pension and Benefits is investigating 11 lawyers as part of the fallout of a state probe into Gloucester County Democratic Chairman Michael Angelini. One is Timothy Higgins, a Democrat who works for several Camden County towns, a Treasury Department official confirmed. Officials in Pennsauken and Oaklyn acknowledged this week that they had erred by allowing Higgins to keep accruing pension credits through his job as their municipal attorney despite a 2007 law barring the practice.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Mantua Mayor Tim Chell, now a nominee for a New Jersey Superior Court judgeship, was in line for a $41,564 pension from multiple part-time jobs as a municipal lawyer and prosecutor in Gloucester County. That is, until the Division of Pensions and Benefits launched an examination of the records of Chell and at least 10 other lawyers to determine whether the jobs they claimed as "pensionable" warranted a retirement payout. In Chell's case, some of them did not. The state sent him a letter in May after concluding he was due a pension of only $14,729.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
SINCE THE STATE Legislature did the right thing by banning elected officials from entering a much-derided deferred retirement program, we were looking forward to not having the program to kick around anymore; we were resigned to simply wait for the six members of Council who signed onto the program to go away with their payouts. But a legal loophole reported in the Daily News would allow six City Council members who signed up for the Deferred Retirement Option Plan to get a boost to their pension should they run for and win re-election.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Division of Pension and Benefits is investigating 11 lawyers as part of the fallout of a state probe into Gloucester County Democratic Chairman Michael Angelini. One is Timothy Higgins, a Democrat who works for several Camden County towns, a Treasury Department official confirmed. Officials in Pennsauken and Oaklyn acknowledged this week that they had erred by allowing Higgins to keep accruing pension credits through his job as their municipal attorney despite a 2007 law barring the practice.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the region's highway authority members and bridge commissioners, even those who sit on the controversial Delaware River Port Authority, are unpaid. But for years, members of the Burlington County Bridge Commission operated under the radar, receiving annual salaries of more than $14,400, plus health benefits and pension credits, to prepare for and attend monthly meetings. That policy effectively ended in the fall when the last paid commissioner got her final check. Unwilling to work free, she completed her term and was replaced late last month by an appointee who will work gratis.
NEWS
October 1, 2006 | By Wendy Ruderman and Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
New Jersey State Sen. Wayne Bryant, already under federal investigation and accused of holding a no-show job at a state university, is racking up lucrative pension credits for another taxpayer-funded job he doesn't always do. Bryant earns nearly $60,000 as a lawyer for the Gloucester County Board of Social Services. One of his key responsibilities is to represent the board in child-support cases in Family Court. While Bryant, 58, counts the work toward his public pension calculation and it could add thousands to his retirement income, junior staffers from his law firm have been appearing in court on his behalf, according to court workers.
NEWS
November 7, 1990
Four former Philadelphia judges richly deserved to forfeit their state pensions for taking Roofers Union money, and that's the position we hope the Pennsylvania Supreme Court will take in ruling on the former judges' pending appeal of their pension denials. But the Supreme Court ought to reach that decision without the participation of Justice Rolf R. Larsen. There's little hope of Justice Larsen's appearing objective on this issue, because he could face the forfeiture of a large portion of his own pension under the state's tough regulations if a preliminary disciplinary recommendation against him ultimately is approved by his Supreme Court colleagues.
NEWS
June 11, 2010 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Angelini, the subject of a scathing New Jersey inspector general's report on public pension abuse in December, will not seek another term as chairman of the Gloucester County Democratic Committee. The Woodbury lawyer, who lives in West Deptford, has held the seat since 1998, the year Democrats took exclusive control of the Board of Chosen Freeholders. State Sen. Fred Madden is expected to be named his replacement in a vote scheduled for Tuesday. "Maybe now is the right time, after 12 years, to take a step back and do some of the things I want to do with my family," said Angelini, 57. The pension issue did not figure into his decision, he said.
NEWS
April 14, 2010 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A pension law signed by Gov. Christie last month barred future part-time employees from the state pension system. Among those remaining in the system, unaffected by the measure, are the lawyers who work part-time for the legislative leadership. But in recent interviews, Senate officials said that could be changing. A spokesman for the New Jersey Senate Democrats said Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) is reviewing the need to keep the majority office's two part-time lawyers on the payroll.
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NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five years after the New Jersey Legislature cracked down on abuse of state pension benefits by local government lawyers and other professionals, little has changed, according to a scathing report released by the state comptroller Tuesday. In a review of just 58 of the state's more than 1,000 municipalities and school districts, investigators found that all but one had failed to properly pull those disqualified from receiving benefits from their pension rolls. In Magnolia, officials relied on the borough lawyer to determine his own pension eligibility until one official threatened to quit, according to the report.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five years after the New Jersey Legislature barred the payment of pension benefits to part-time municipal service providers, mainly attorneys, the practice continues in towns across the state, according to a report released by the state comptroller Tuesday. In a review of just 58 of the state's more than 1,000 municipalities and school districts, investigators found that all but one had failed to properly pull those disqualified from receiving benefits from their pension rolls. In those entities alone, that could amount to $2.2 million a year in illegal pension and health benefit costs to the state, according to comptroller A. Matthew Boxer's report.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Mantua Mayor Tim Chell, now a nominee for a New Jersey Superior Court judgeship, was in line for a $41,564 pension from multiple part-time jobs as a municipal lawyer and prosecutor in Gloucester County. That is, until the Division of Pensions and Benefits launched an examination of the records of Chell and at least 10 other lawyers to determine whether the jobs they claimed as "pensionable" warranted a retirement payout. In Chell's case, some of them did not. The state sent him a letter in May after concluding he was due a pension of only $14,729.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Veteran public official Lee Solomon, president of the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, will be nominated to return to his previous position as a Camden County Superior Court judge, Gov. Christie said Thursday. The Haddonfield Republican has been a county freeholder, state assemblyman, county prosecutor, state monitor of the Camden police, and deputy U.S. attorney for South Jersey. Solomon, 57, was a judge from 2006 to 2010. After Christie was elected in 2009, he asked Solomon, who worked under him when the governor was U.S. attorney, to take a cabinet-level position heading the BPU. The agency regulates natural gas, electricity, water, telecommunications, and cable TV. "If anybody else in the world had asked me to leave the bench, I would have said no," Solomon said at a joint Statehouse news conference.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the region's highway authority members and bridge commissioners, even those who sit on the controversial Delaware River Port Authority, are unpaid. But for years, members of the Burlington County Bridge Commission operated under the radar, receiving annual salaries of more than $14,400, plus health benefits and pension credits, to prepare for and attend monthly meetings. That policy effectively ended in the fall when the last paid commissioner got her final check. Unwilling to work free, she completed her term and was replaced late last month by an appointee who will work gratis.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
SINCE THE STATE Legislature did the right thing by banning elected officials from entering a much-derided deferred retirement program, we were looking forward to not having the program to kick around anymore; we were resigned to simply wait for the six members of Council who signed onto the program to go away with their payouts. But a legal loophole reported in the Daily News would allow six City Council members who signed up for the Deferred Retirement Option Plan to get a boost to their pension should they run for and win re-election.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Joyce, the Delaware River Port Authority executive who resigned this week after allegations of E-ZPass abuse, improperly received pension credits last year for a part-time, $67,356 solicitor's job in Pennsauken. Records show he also received pension credits to which he was not entitled in 2008 for a second, $18,200 solicitor position with the Pennsauken Sewerage Authority. The errors boosted the Camden County Democrat's total pensionable salary in 2008 and 2009 to the highest levels of his 26 years in the system.
NEWS
June 11, 2010 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Angelini, the subject of a scathing New Jersey inspector general's report on public pension abuse in December, will not seek another term as chairman of the Gloucester County Democratic Committee. The Woodbury lawyer, who lives in West Deptford, has held the seat since 1998, the year Democrats took exclusive control of the Board of Chosen Freeholders. State Sen. Fred Madden is expected to be named his replacement in a vote scheduled for Tuesday. "Maybe now is the right time, after 12 years, to take a step back and do some of the things I want to do with my family," said Angelini, 57. The pension issue did not figure into his decision, he said.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The New Jersey Division of Pension and Benefits is investigating 11 lawyers as part of the fallout of a state probe into Gloucester County Democratic Chairman Michael Angelini. One is Timothy Higgins, a Democrat who works for several Camden County towns, a Treasury Department official confirmed. Officials in Pennsauken and Oaklyn acknowledged this week that they had erred by allowing Higgins to keep accruing pension credits through his job as their municipal attorney despite a 2007 law barring the practice.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Division of Pension and Benefits is investigating 11 lawyers as part of the fallout of a state probe into Gloucester County Democratic Chairman Michael Angelini. One is Timothy Higgins, a Democrat who works for several Camden County towns, a Treasury Department official confirmed. Officials in Pennsauken and Oaklyn acknowledged this week that they had erred by allowing Higgins to keep accruing pension credits through his job as their municipal attorney despite a 2007 law barring the practice.
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