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NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
CITY COUNCIL President Darrell Clarke is pushing a new version of the hotly debated city sales-tax legislation that could provide more money to Philadelphia's struggling schools and pension system, sources with knowledge of the negotiations said. Clarke's proposal, which is still evolving, would send the district almost all of the tax's expected revenue next year. Then, over three to five years, the pension fund's share of the money would gradually increase until there is a 50/50 split.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
IT TOOK 10 MONTHS for Council President Darrell Clarke to introduce an extension of a city sales-tax hike that could send money to the School District of Philadelphia and the pension system. It took about four hours for it to be picked apart by skeptics, including Mayor Nutter, Superintendent William Hite and School Reform Commission chairman Bill Green, who called it "a distraction. " "It's not going to happen," Green said of the proposal's chances of being authorized by Harrisburg lawmakers.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
Special providence A four-time felon who shoots a person and buries her alive can't endure a "botched" execution ("No more executions," May 1). The expression you want is "providentially extended. " Jerry Axelrod, Huntingdon Valley In Wolf's pack I agree with the editorial "McCord best of a fine field" (May 4) in that it is a quality group of gubernatorial candidates. But we part ways on the endorsement of Rob McCord partly because of his House of Cards -style attack on Tom Wolf.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
THOUGH it's hard to believe, the Philadelphia School District's financial situation is about to get worse. Despite slashing its budget, closing schools and shedding nearly 8,000 jobs in recent years, the district still faces a deficit in the range of $210 million in the next school year. And it doesn't have much time to come up with the additional money. The School Reform Commission must approve a budget for the 2014-15 school year by May 30. Without assured funding from state and local sources, the SRC will have no choice but to once again cut jobs and programs.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the battle lines drawn by Mayor Nutter's budget address, combatants on the dominant issues facing lawmakers this spring wasted no time staking their positions. A week after protesters were shut out of the mayor's speech - and Nutter spoke to a uncharacteristically subdued chamber - advocates returned in force for Thursday's City Council meeting. They flooded the hallways before the meeting, sat with their signs during the proceedings, and visited with Council members after. And during the meeting, members of a coalition fighting the proposed sale of the Philadelphia Gas Works even were even able to adress Council from the lectern.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE $3.8 billion budget that Mayor Nutter will propose to City Council today would increase spending by only 1.3 percent, which is less than inflation, according to a budget overview obtained by the Daily News . Excluding a pass-through appropriation that would be triggered only if the city sells Philadelphia Gas Works, Nutter is proposing a $47 million uptick in spending. Of that, $32 million would go to nondiscretionary pension and debt-service costs, and the rest would be scattered across selected programs.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many investors, Philadelphia's city employee pension fund had a good year in 2013. It earned close to 11 percent in the fiscal year ended last June and kept making gains the rest of the year. But the better-than-usual investment performance didn't dent the pension system's huge unfunded liability. That figure actually climbed to nearly $5.2 billion as of July 1, leaving the fund with less than half (48.1 percent) of the assets it should have to meet its eventual liabilities, according to a new actuarial analysis presented Thursday to the city's retirement board.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
DESPITE HIGHER-than-expected investment returns, the city's pension fund remains less than half-funded, an actuary told the city yesterday. At the end of the last fiscal year, in July, the pension system had enough money to cover only 48.1 percent of its future liabilities - the same ratio as last year - Kenneth Kent, of the actuarial firm Cheiron, said at a meeting of the city Board of Pensions. Later in the meeting, the board voted to lower its expected rate of return on investments, which will have the effect of further increasing the unfunded liability.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
ENDING A five-year stalemate, Mayor Nutter yesterday signed a tentative agreement for a new contract with the city's white-collar union. Nutter announced the deal last night with Fred Wright, the recently elected president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees' District Council 47. Nutter cited Wright's replacing union president Cathy Scott as a reason the negotiations moved forward. "This agreement, as everyone knows, has been a long time in coming, and not for a moment would I suggest that it's been an easy process because it has not been," Nutter said at a news conference.
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