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NEWS
December 7, 2012 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
  THE DEBATE OVER U.S. Rep. Bob Brady's unconventional proposal to have a nonprofit be a partner with a gaming company so that casino profits can be funneled to Philadelphia now moves to City Council. Council on Thursday approved hearings on the idea. Only Councilman David Oh voted no. The hearings, proposed by Councilmen Kenyatta Johnson and Jim Kenney, would "examine the feasibility and legality" of what the resolution calls "an extraordinary opportunity. " The nonprofit, established on Nov. 15 as the Philadelphia Casino Benefit Corp., would direct its share of the casino profits to the city's underfunded pension fund and school district.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
City Councilmen Kenyatta Johnson and James F. Kenney are calling for a hearing to consider a proposal from Penn National Gaming Inc. to use profits from a casino to help fund city schools and the municipal pension fund. Johnson will submit a resolution for a hearing at Council's Dec. 6 session. Penn National is one of six groups vying for the city's second casino license. Under its proposal, the company would create a nonprofit to hold two-thirds of the equity in the casino. In a letter sent Wednesday to Deputy Mayor Alan Greenberger, Johnson and Kenney said that while they had not endorsed any application for a casino license, they think the Penn National idea should be explored.
NEWS
November 27, 2012
City Councilmen Kenyatta Johnson and James F. Kenney are calling for a hearing to consider a proposal from Penn National Gaming Inc. to use profits from a casino to help fund city schools and the municipal pension fund. Johnson will submit a resolution for a hearing at the Dec. 6 Council session. Penn National is one of six groups vying for the city's second casino license. Under its proposal, the company would create a nonprofit to hold two-thirds of the equity in the casino.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
On paper, it looks altruistic enough: Build a South Philadelphia casino through a public-private partnership and earmark two-thirds of the profits to benefit city schools and pensioners. That's the premise behind the proposed Hollywood Casino Philadelphia at the stadium complex, one of six projects vying for the second and final city gaming license. The problem, and possibly a big one: City officials, namely Mayor Nutter, were never dialed into the plan. The unconventional proposal - crafted by gambling powerhouse Penn National Gaming Inc. and Democratic U.S. Rep. Bob Brady - would allow Penn National a one-third stake in a casino to be built at the South Philadelphia Turf Club at 700 Packer Ave.; two-thirds of the profits would go to the Philadelphia School District and the city's pension fund via a nonprofit.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
The Pennsylvania Senate has a powerful voice on state policy, including key issues of gun control, health care, transportation funding, taxes, and natural gas drilling. Here are The Inquirer's recommendations in contested area Senate races. NINTH DISTRICT Since Sen. Dominic F. Pileggi became the Senate's Republican leader six years ago, he has faced opponents who hope to turn his reelection into a referendum on Harrisburg GOP policies. That's never been a problem for Pileggi, 54, a former mayor of Chester, who is a cautious moderate and fiscal conservative.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2012
IN THE REGION Preit: City help needed to redo Gallery Efforts to secure public financing to redevelop the Gallery at Market East are a "work in progress" and Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust is working on "a number of government concessions that need to occur," Preit chief executive Joseph F. Coradino told investors Wednesday in a quarterly earnings call. "The scope and scale of the project is going to be driven to a great extent by the amount of public financing that we end up getting," Coradino said.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - New Jersey voters will get the last word on whether state judges can be forced to pay more for their pensions and health care. A question on the Nov. 6 ballot asks voters to amend the state constitution to allow a 2011 law to be applied to judges and Supreme Court justices. The law requires more money to be deducted from public workers' salaries to help pay for benefits. A Superior Court judge in Hudson County challenged the law and won. The state Supreme Court subsequently agreed that the law violated the constitution by effectively reducing judges' salaries while they are on the bench.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD - There were a few barely audible boos when Gov. Christie arrived at the New Jersey Firemen's Convention at the Wildwoods Convention Center. But two years after the same crowd jeered him so heartily that Christie has proudly recounted the incident to illustrate his willingness to do the unpopular - like force public workers to pay more for their benefits - the governor received an overwhelmingly positive reception Friday at the annual gathering. Some gave him a standing ovation as Christie bounded up the steps to the portable stage erected for the occasion.
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILDWOOD - There were a few barely audible boos when Gov. Christie arrived at the New Jersey Firemen's Convention at the Wildwoods Convention Center. But two years after the same crowd jeered him so heartily that Christie has proudly recounted the incident to illustrate his willingness to do the unpopular - like force public workers to pay more for their benefits - the governor received an overwhelmingly positive reception Friday at the annual gathering. Some gave him a standing ovation as Christie bounded up the steps to the portable stage erected for the occasion.
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
WILDWOOD - There were a few barely audible boos when Gov. Christie arrived at the New Jersey Firemen's Convention at the Wildwoods Convention Center. But two years after the same crowd jeered him so heartily that Christie has proudly recounted the incident to illustrate his willingness to do the unpopular - like force public workers to pay more for their benefits - the governor received an overwhelmingly positive reception Friday at the annual gathering. Some gave him a standing ovation as Christie bounded up the steps to the portable stage erected for the occasion.
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