CollectionsPension Reform
IN THE NEWS

Pension Reform

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 29, 2010 | By Wallace Nunn
The Pennsylvania House's approach to pension reform is, to paraphrase Lincoln, government of the unions, by the unions, and for the unions. Unsurprisingly, legislators also put in a little something for themselves. House Bill 2497 is being touted as a reform of the bloated pension system currently enjoyed by state workers, public school teachers, and (even more so) elected officials. Of course, if you are an average Pennsylvania taxpayer, you might think of it as the pension system from hell.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
By Jennifer Stefano Most Pennsylvania families wouldn't dream of ignoring their financial obligations and spending money they don't have, passing on their bills to others. So why do the representatives of those families think they can get away with that type of behavior? In 2001, the General Assembly approved enhanced retirement benefits for themselves and state workers, expecting taxpayers to pick up the tab at the expense of their own retirements and households. Making the situation worse, in the years since, the state has not been contributing its fair share to the pension funds.
NEWS
March 15, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com215-854-4172
AN ADVOCACY GROUP campaigning nationally for public pension reform visited Philadelphia on Thursday promising to "expose" the city's top pension recipients - including one retiree with a $4.5 million estimated lifetime payout. But what the group really exposed was its own fuzzy math. The Chicago-based Taxpayers United of America released a list of local pension recipients, topped by former Police Commissioner Sylvester Johnson, who it said would get an "estimated lifetime pension" of $4.5 million.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - With only a week until he delivers his budget proposal, Gov. Corbett is making it increasingly clear that his administration is willing to play hardball to get the legislature to confront the escalating cost of public employee pensions. And likely to be caught in the middle of the fracas: aid to public schools. Speaking Monday at a monthly press club luncheon, Corbett budget secretary Charles Zogby reiterated - albeit more forcefully than before - that unless legislators tackle the rising cost of Pennsylvania's two major pension funds, there will be deep cuts in the next state budget, and very possibly in education funding.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
STIRLING. N.J. On the heels of his budget address, Gov. Christie on Wednesday pushed the need for pension changes to a receptive town-hall meeting audience in predominantly Republican Morris County, pledging to take "extreme measures" if Democrats do not heed his call to cooperate. Describing himself as "the adult in the room," in contrast with legislative Democrats, who said after his speech Tuesday that the state's rising pension costs did not demand changes, Christie told about 500 people at the Long Hill Community Center that New Jersey could wind up like bankrupt Detroit if something is not done.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
By Richard C. Dreyfuss As Gov. Corbett's fiscal year 2013-14 state budget proposal is finalized, the familiar challenge of balancing finite resources against ever-increasing spending requests begins. This year, expect debates over special initiatives ranging from liquor privatization to transportation funding. But there is one recurring and unresolved challenge that only seems to become worse with each passing year - public pensions costs, specifically those of two statewide plans, the Public School Employees' Retirement System (PSERS)
NEWS
January 31, 2013
THE PENDING FIGHT over pensions for Pennsylvania state workers and public-school employees is certain to include enough actuarial data and ideology to make most minds, including mine, go numb. We're talking billions of obligated tax dollars to hundreds of thousands of people, lots of politics, Rubik's Cube-like fiscal stuff, some of which will wind up in court, making more paydays for lawyers. It is, in short, a cluster-shag. At the heart of the issue is a divide separating (most)
NEWS
March 11, 2013
Josh Shapiro is the Montgomery County commissioners chairman and serves as chairman of the county's pension board When trying to pare budgets and be more efficient, go where the money is. That's why Montgomery County, the commonwealth's third most populous county, closely examined the costs associated with our $450 million public employee pension fund. Public pensions are an area of significant potential savings, and of particular importance to state and local governments around the country.
NEWS
September 9, 2009
TOMORROW, the state House is likely to vote again on House Bill 1848, providing fiscal relief for our battered city budget. The second vote is necessary because the state Senate amended the bill to include big changes to public pension plans across the state. There are three possible outcomes of the vote: The House could defeat the bill because it doesn't want to rile up the unions or mess with pension reform. That's the worst case for the city. Or it could alter the amendments in the bill, which would cause another delay as the bill goes back to the Senate.
NEWS
October 31, 1986 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
City Council apparently is preparing to tack an improvement in pension benefits for elected officials, including Council members, onto a 30-page municipal-pension reform bill proposed by the Goode administration. A bill introduced yesterday by Council President Joseph E. Coleman would allow local elected officials to become vested in the city pension fund after only six years, instead of the current 10 years it takes for all city employees to qualify for pension payments when they retire.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Back in 2011, Gov. Christie bragged that the pension and health benefits deal he had cut with the Legislature was a "model for America. " It would save the benefits funds and save the state, and it had a cherry on top: It was the fruit of bipartisan cooperation. Now Christie is saying the same funds are poised to collapse and bring New Jersey down with them. And if the Legislature doesn't cooperate with his plan to solve the problem, he said at a recent town-hall meeting, "I'll have to take more extreme measures to deal with it. " Such bombast makes one wonder whether the governor is striving to draw attention away from investigations of the epic traffic jam caused by his aides.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
To accomplish the first-term agenda that would burnish his image as a pragmatic leader, Gov. Christie relied on an ally across the aisle: Senate President Stephen Sweeney. The Gloucester County Democrat backed the Republican governor on initiatives Christie would count among his key successes: requirements that public workers pay more toward their pensions, limits on police and fire salary increases reached through arbitration, and a property-tax cap. Now, their partnership appears to be hitting a rough patch: Christie wants more changes to the state pension system, while Sweeney says Christie is picking an unnecessary battle with public workers.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
STIRLING. N.J. On the heels of his budget address, Gov. Christie on Wednesday pushed the need for pension changes to a receptive town-hall meeting audience in predominantly Republican Morris County, pledging to take "extreme measures" if Democrats do not heed his call to cooperate. Describing himself as "the adult in the room," in contrast with legislative Democrats, who said after his speech Tuesday that the state's rising pension costs did not demand changes, Christie told about 500 people at the Long Hill Community Center that New Jersey could wind up like bankrupt Detroit if something is not done.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
IT WAS a kinder, gentler Tom Corbett who stood before the General Assembly yesterday to deliver his proposed $29.4 billion budget for the new fiscal year that begins July 1. No dividing government programs into the "must-haves versus nice-to-haves," as he did in his first budget speech. In that budget, education was clearly a "nice-to-have," because the governor axed state aid to basic and higher education. He did it again in his second year of office as well. That was the old Tom Corbett.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By David Porter, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - Gov. Christie flaunted his bipartisan support Tuesday, taking a walking tour in Newark flanked by two Democratic county officials who have crossed party lines to endorse him in his reelection bid. Accompanying Christie through the Ironbound section, known for its Portuguese influence and numerous restaurants, were Essex County Executive Joseph DiVincenzo and longtime county Sheriff Armando Fontoura. DiVincenzo is the highest-profile Democrat to endorse Christie.
NEWS
July 2, 2013
HEY, PENNSYLVANIA, happy new fiscal year! The Republican-controlled Legislature gave Republican Gov. Corbett another (almost) on-time, no-new-taxes budget last night, but failed to give him his "big three" - privatized booze, pension reform and transportation funding. Still, the governor signed the $28.4 billion spending plan, which is $64 million less than he requested back in February, at a little after 10 p.m. (Paperwork parts of the budget are still incomplete but are expected to be finished today and tomorrow.)
NEWS
June 25, 2013
OK, GET READY. This week determines the fate of the governor, Philly schools, state stores, pension reform, the state budget, SEPTA, whether Pennsylvania bridges will collapse under the weight of their own decrepitude and, by implication, life as we know it. Maybe. It's the rush to the annual June 30 deadline, when Harrisburg decides how and where tax dollars are spent, what policies progress and what issues go back down the ever-munching maw of the Legislature for redigestion.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
By Jennifer Stefano Most Pennsylvania families wouldn't dream of ignoring their financial obligations and spending money they don't have, passing on their bills to others. So why do the representatives of those families think they can get away with that type of behavior? In 2001, the General Assembly approved enhanced retirement benefits for themselves and state workers, expecting taxpayers to pick up the tab at the expense of their own retirements and households. Making the situation worse, in the years since, the state has not been contributing its fair share to the pension funds.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
THERE'S A PHRASE floating around Harrisburg: "Keep your feet in sand. " Has nothing to do with being "down the Shore. " Has to do with positions lawmakers and Gov. Corbett might want to take on liquor privatization, transportation funding, pension reform and passage of a new state budget by month's end. It's good advice. Compromise. Be less rigid. Get something done. That way shifting elements within issues could lead to a budget, liquor reform, fixes for transportation and mass transit, and savings on pension costs.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Consider it the unofficial start of what could shape up to be a frantic season of budget wrangling. Republicans who control the House on Wednesday outlined their vision of what a state budget should look like, and it boiled down to this: $28.3 billion in spending, including some extra money thrown in for public schools. At a news conference in the Capitol, the House GOP's leadership said its proposal includes an additional $10 million in funding for K-12 education over what Gov. Corbett, also a Republican, proposed in February as part of his $28.4 billion spending plan.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|