CollectionsPension Reform
IN THE NEWS

Pension Reform

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 29, 2010 | By Wallace Nunn
The Pennsylvania House's approach to pension reform is, to paraphrase Lincoln, government of the unions, by the unions, and for the unions. Unsurprisingly, legislators also put in a little something for themselves. House Bill 2497 is being touted as a reform of the bloated pension system currently enjoyed by state workers, public school teachers, and (even more so) elected officials. Of course, if you are an average Pennsylvania taxpayer, you might think of it as the pension system from hell.
NEWS
June 10, 2013
By Jennifer Stefano Most Pennsylvania families wouldn't dream of ignoring their financial obligations and spending money they don't have, passing on their bills to others. So why do the representatives of those families think they can get away with that type of behavior? In 2001, the General Assembly approved enhanced retirement benefits for themselves and state workers, expecting taxpayers to pick up the tab at the expense of their own retirements and households. Making the situation worse, in the years since, the state has not been contributing its fair share to the pension funds.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - No pension reform, no state budget. A top Senate Republican said Monday that if Gov. Wolf doesn't address the state's skyrocketing pension costs during budget negotiations with the legislature, there will be no budget. Majority Leader Jake Corman (R., Centre) said that reining in the cost of public employee pensions is a priority, and that he and his colleagues will not pass a spending plan if it is not addressed. "We are not doing a budget without it," Corman said during a monthly press club luncheon in Harrisburg, comparing the state's pension problem to a "tsunami" that has already reached land.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Raising hopes for a budget deal, Republican legislative leaders emerged from negotiations Wednesday saying they would give Gov. Wolf a portion of the money he wants for public schools as long as he accepts their plan for pension reform. Though details were scant, Republicans who control both legislative chambers said they would agree to allocate an additional $400 million for classroom spending on kindergarten through 12th grade if the governor agreed to their counterproposal for reining in the ballooning cost of public-employee pensions.
NEWS
March 15, 2012 | BY CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com215-854-4172
AN ADVOCACY GROUP campaigning nationally for public pension reform visited Philadelphia on Thursday promising to "expose" the city's top pension recipients - including one retiree with a $4.5 million estimated lifetime payout. But what the group really exposed was its own fuzzy math. The Chicago-based Taxpayers United of America released a list of local pension recipients, topped by former Police Commissioner Sylvester Johnson, who it said would get an "estimated lifetime pension" of $4.5 million.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - With only a week until he delivers his budget proposal, Gov. Corbett is making it increasingly clear that his administration is willing to play hardball to get the legislature to confront the escalating cost of public employee pensions. And likely to be caught in the middle of the fracas: aid to public schools. Speaking Monday at a monthly press club luncheon, Corbett budget secretary Charles Zogby reiterated - albeit more forcefully than before - that unless legislators tackle the rising cost of Pennsylvania's two major pension funds, there will be deep cuts in the next state budget, and very possibly in education funding.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
WASHINGTON Gov. Christie continued Tuesday to make his pitch for pension reform and renewal of a cap on raises for public workers, sounding alarms about the state's economic future in a speech at a New Jersey Chamber of Commerce dinner. Addressing business leaders, lawmakers, and lobbyists at the chamber's annual "Walk to Washington" event, Christie said the state was doing better than it was four years ago. But that progress will be derailed, the Republican governor said, if the Democrats who control the Legislature do not agree to make further changes to the state's pension system and continue a 2 percent cap on raises for police and firefighters.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
By Richard C. Dreyfuss As Gov. Corbett's fiscal year 2013-14 state budget proposal is finalized, the familiar challenge of balancing finite resources against ever-increasing spending requests begins. This year, expect debates over special initiatives ranging from liquor privatization to transportation funding. But there is one recurring and unresolved challenge that only seems to become worse with each passing year - public pensions costs, specifically those of two statewide plans, the Public School Employees' Retirement System (PSERS)
NEWS
January 31, 2013
THE PENDING FIGHT over pensions for Pennsylvania state workers and public-school employees is certain to include enough actuarial data and ideology to make most minds, including mine, go numb. We're talking billions of obligated tax dollars to hundreds of thousands of people, lots of politics, Rubik's Cube-like fiscal stuff, some of which will wind up in court, making more paydays for lawyers. It is, in short, a cluster-shag. At the heart of the issue is a divide separating (most)
NEWS
March 11, 2013
Josh Shapiro is the Montgomery County commissioners chairman and serves as chairman of the county's pension board When trying to pare budgets and be more efficient, go where the money is. That's why Montgomery County, the commonwealth's third most populous county, closely examined the costs associated with our $450 million public employee pension fund. Public pensions are an area of significant potential savings, and of particular importance to state and local governments around the country.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Raising hopes for a budget deal, Republican legislative leaders emerged from negotiations Wednesday saying they would give Gov. Wolf a portion of the money he wants for public schools as long as he accepts their plan for pension reform. Though details were scant, Republicans who control both legislative chambers said they would agree to allocate an additional $400 million for classroom spending on kindergarten through 12th grade if the governor agreed to their counterproposal for reining in the ballooning cost of public-employee pensions.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Jessica Parks and Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - During an hour-long negotiating session Wednesday, Gov. Wolf and Republican legislators inched toward compromise on some key sticking points in a budget six weeks overdue. House Speaker Mike Turzai (R., Allegheny) was careful to temper expectations, but said the talks marked the first time he had seen "some movement [by Wolf] acknowledging our perspective" on pension reform and privatization of the state liquor store system. "There's no breakthrough," Turzai said, "but it was an important discussion.
NEWS
August 7, 2015
THE U.S. ATTORNEY'S Office in Philly recently made itself a laughingstock with its relentless pursuit of the utterly irrelevant Joey Merlino for the outrageous criminal outrage of having a scotch and a cigar with a guy he knew 30 years ago. The Chaka Fattah indictment is somewhat less amusing, however. That this is purely a political vendetta cannot be doubted. The velvet glove came off for all to see when Sen. Menendez was indicted - another guy who was "being investigated" for years but then suddenly was indicted when the president's Iran deal was about to be finalized and it became clear Menendez would be the loudest Democratic vote against it. There are Democrats who are concerned about national security, but they now seem rather muted in their criticism over the prospect of a nuclear Iran 10 years from now. I wonder why that happened, don't you?
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf on Thursday vetoed the Republican-backed pension reform plan, striking down the final piece of a trifecta of budget bills from the GOP-controlled legislature. Wolf said that he understood the need for reining in the skyrocketing cost of public-employee pensions, but that "this legislation provides no immediate cost savings to taxpayers and does not maximize long-term savings for taxpayers. " "We need pension reform that works," Wolf said in a statement.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Two measures dealing with issues that are key to any state budget deal - property taxes and pensions - began moving through the legislature Tuesday, with lawmakers pushing for swift action on both. The House began debate on a multibillion-dollar property-tax relief measure whose prospects are uncertain, while the Senate is poised to vote on a Republican-backed proposal to rein in the cost of public-employee pensions. Both bills are up for final passage Wednesday, after which legislators will break until June, when budget talks with Gov. Wolf will begin in earnest.
NEWS
April 9, 2015
I'M FEELING a little sorry for the Republican Party these days. For one thing, it can't really play in the mayor's race. And I mean no offense to Melissa Murray Bailey (the GOP candidate, in case you're wondering). For another thing, the party seems intent on reprising its off-message messes at the national and maybe even the state level. Doesn't it seem as if the national plan, as trotted out in Indiana, is stopping gays from getting married? Message: If only we could keep lesbians from buying bridal bouquets in Bloomington, the country could get back on track.
NEWS
April 8, 2015
For one thing, it can't really play in the mayor's race. And I mean no offense to Melissa Murray Bailey (the GOP candidate, in case you're wondering). For another thing, the party seems intent on reprising its off-message messes at the national and maybe even the state level. Doesn't it seem as if the national plan, as trotted out in Indiana, is stopping gays from getting married? Message: If only we could keep lesbians from buying bridal bouquets in Bloomington, the country could get back on track.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - No pension reform, no state budget. A top Senate Republican said Monday that if Gov. Wolf doesn't address the state's skyrocketing pension costs during budget negotiations with the legislature, there will be no budget. Majority Leader Jake Corman (R., Centre) said that reining in the cost of public employee pensions is a priority, and that he and his colleagues will not pass a spending plan if it is not addressed. "We are not doing a budget without it," Corman said during a monthly press club luncheon in Harrisburg, comparing the state's pension problem to a "tsunami" that has already reached land.
NEWS
March 3, 2015
By Kevin Shivers At his inauguration, Gov. Wolf said: "We need leaders today who are willing to listen to each other and learn from each other. " Since taking office, Wolf has been working behind the scenes and visiting with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to establish working relationships. He's also met with many outside groups to hear their concerns. On Tuesday, Wolf will have the opportunity to lay out his agenda and present his first budget proposal in a speech before the General Assembly.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
New governors tend to dwell on the superlative difficulty of the job ahead, if only to lower expectations and impugn their predecessors. In Tom Wolf's case, however, the requisite doomsaying has the distinction of being somewhat grounded in reality. Wolf is taking over a state government with a more than $2 billion budget deficit, a $47 billion unfunded pension liability, and battered credit ratings that rank among the bottom three states. The commonwealth's sluggish economic and employment growth don't seem likely to help soon.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|