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NEWS
June 21, 1988
There are leaks in the Pentagon and they're not the kind the Reaganisti are always worrying about. Nobody has let the people know how their money is being legitimately wasted. The place is leaking cash. Somebody's been copping it. It appears that some Pentagon officials, members of Congress and their staffs and anybody else who can do a military contractor some good have been accepting illegal payoffs. That's not much of a surprise. With all the money thrown at the Pentagon in the last seven years, someone was sure to start stealing sooner or later.
NEWS
May 29, 1986
When the Pentagon wants a few dumpsters full of money, what it generally does is come up with a weapons system. That is some fantastically expensive killing device that may or may not work, but puts on a good show for visitors from Congress. In times when money's especially tight, the Pentagon then makes any savings and cuts in less obvious places, like fuel, ammunition and maintenance to make those fancy weapons work. It is a remarkably short-sighted and ineffective way to do business.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | By Tim Weiner, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Pentagon is spending billions of dollars in the Persian Gulf under an obscure Civil War statute that allowed Union soldiers to steal grain for their horses. The Pentagon says the statute - the Feed and Forage Act of 1861 - permits it to spend money Congress never put in the military budget. "We are entitled to spend more money than has been appropriated by the Congress," Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams said yesterday. Williams said the Army, for example, would exhaust the year's $22.5 billion operations and maintenance account by April - six months early - unless the Pentagon invoked the 130-year-old law. The Constitution says: "No money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in consequence of appropriations made by law. " The Pentagon has used the 1861 law since August to fund its operations in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
September 19, 1987 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Less than three hours after President Reagan announced a tentative arms control pact with the Soviet Union, Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger yesterday publicly ordered tests begun on the hardware that might be used in the first phase of the Strategic Defense Initiative. The Soviet Union has vigorously opposed SDI - a space-based missile-shield program popularly known as "Star Wars. " "There may have been people in Washington who would have preferred that it not be announced while the Soviets were in meetings here," said Pentagon spokesman Robert Sims.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
A top marshal of the Soviet Union went to the citadel of American military power yesterday and talked about "Star Wars. " It was another summit precedent-setter. Marshal Sergei F. Akhromeyev, chief of the Soviet general staff and military adviser to Mikhail S. Gorbachev, was the highest ranking Soviet, and one of the few of any rank, ever to set foot in the Pentagon. He was scheduled to go back today for breakfast and a meeting with the U.S. military chiefs. Pentagon officials declined to discuss the outcome of the meeting between Carlucci and Akhromeyev.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
When spring arrived last month, so did a 135,000-lire bonus for the Pentagon's workers in Italy - $108 at current exchange rates. And when autumn rolls around, the Italians will find a similar premium in their paychecks. That is on top of their Christmas bonus of a month's pay, averaging more than $1,900, and the additional month's pay each receives at vacation time. In West Germany, the Pentagon's native workers get a Christmas bonus averaging almost $1,750 - along with an annual vacation bonus averaging $550.
NEWS
October 17, 2007
LETTER-writer Mark Walker makes a snide comment regarding the lack of photos of Flight 77 crashing into the Pentagon on 9/11 by pointing out how clear the security-camera photos of a shoplifting incident at a local Sears are. Because the crashes in New York were well photographed, it seems odd to some that Flight 77's crash into the Pentagon was not equally well photographed. Consider that we have no photos of the Titanic actually hitting an iceberg, so why do we accept that as fact?
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
Learning that the Defense Department may have stored away $30 billion worth of things it doesn't need made me feel a lot better about my basement. We don't have anywhere near $30 billion worth of stuff down there. In fact, according to the lowest estimate - that would be my wife's - what we have in our basement has no monetary value at all. She didn't actually prepare a formal estimate with hard numbers; I've put them together by extrapolation from the phrase "a bunch of worthless junk.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The nation's biggest defense contractors may have overcharged the Pentagon by $4 billion - and potentially much more - using computerized accounting systems that do not adequately protect the government's interests, according to Defense Department auditors. The Defense Contract Audit Agency, in its first written assessment of the excess charges, released a document yesterday estimating that improper charges ranging from $20 million to $500 million may have been realized by each of 200 contractors in recent years.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Senior Pentagon leaders are taking another look at sharply reducing the number of unpaid furlough days that department civilians will have to take in the coming months, suggesting they may be able to cut the number from 14 to as few as seven, defense officials said Thursday. If the number is reduced, it would be the second time the Pentagon has cut the number of furlough days. It had initially been set at 22 days. The officials say no decision has been made and that they are not ruling out efforts to drop the furloughs entirely.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service will be Tuesday, May 27, for Irvin Hamburger, 86, formerly of Elkins Park, who died Sunday, Feb. 9, of pneumonia at Martins Run in Media, where he had lived for the last six years. The service will be at 11 a.m. in the retirement community at 11 Martins Run. A native of Washington, Mr. Hamburger loved flying. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps. After graduating from the Catholic University of America he spent several years in the construction business with his father.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was only once that a flash of anger and annoyance broke through the otherwise well-modulated and pleasant persona that former Defense Secretary Robert Gates presented to the capacity crowd at the National Constitution Center last Friday. Gates, on a tour to promote his book about his years as defense secretary under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, was asked why the military had resisted building specially hardened troop carriers that, in the few instances where they had been used, had proved so effective in protecting soldiers from the devastating blasts of improvised explosive devices or roadside bombs used throughout Iraq by enemy fighters.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a 30-year military career in which he earned three graduate degrees, rose to the rank of colonel, and served as an aide to Pentagon brass, Robert Freniere can guess what people might say when they learn he's unemployed and lives out of his van: Why doesn't this guy get a job as a janitor? Freniere answers his own question: "Well, I've tried that. " Freniere, 59, says that his plea for help, to a janitor he once praised when the man was mopping the floors of his Washington office, went unfulfilled.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United States is delaying delivery of four F-16 fighter jets to Egypt in light of the military overthrow of Mohammed Morsi as president, but it has not decided whether to suspend military aid more broadly, the Pentagon said Wednesday. Pentagon press secretary George Little said President Obama made the decision to hold up the F-16 delivery while the administration continues to review options and consult with Congress on military assistance generally. The four F-16s were to be delivered under a previously arranged sale of 20. Eight of the F-16s were delivered earlier this year; after the four originally set for delivery this week the final eight were to be sent later this year.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
Liz Cheney to run in Wyo. CHEYENNE, Wyo. - Former Vice President Dick Cheney's daughter Liz Cheney will run against Wyoming's senior U.S. senator in next year's Republican primary, her campaign said Tuesday. Liz Cheney, 46, is the elder of Dick Cheney's two daughters. Her announcement is a political challenge unlike anything Wyoming has seen for years, maybe decades. Republicans in the state rarely challenge incumbents of their own party in national office. All three members of the state's congressional delegation and all statewide elected officials are Republican.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is eyeing plans to eliminate danger pay for service members in as many as 18 countries and five waterways around the world, saving about $120 million a year while taking a bite out of troops' salaries, The Associated Press has learned. Senior defense and military leaders are expected to meet later this week to review the matter and are poised to approve a new plan. Pentagon press secretary George Little declined to discuss details but said no final decisions have been made.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon's effort to account for tens of thousands of Americans missing in action from foreign wars is so inept, mismanaged and wasteful that it risks descending from "dysfunction to total failure," according to an internal study suppressed by military officials. Largely beyond the public spotlight, the decades-old pursuit of bones and other MIA evidence is sluggish, often duplicative and subjected to too little scientific rigor, the report says. The report paints a picture of a Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, a military-run group known as JPAC and headed by a two-star general, as woefully inept and even corrupt.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Ellen Nakashima, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Designs for many of the nation's most sensitive advanced weapons systems have been compromised by Chinese hackers, according to a report prepared for the Pentagon and to officials from government and the defense industry. Among more than two dozen major weapons systems whose designs were breached were programs critical to U.S. missile defenses and combat aircraft and ships, according to a previously undisclosed section of a confidential report prepared by the Defense Science Board for Pentagon leaders.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel informed President Obama of the latest sexual-assault allegations against a military man who was assigned to prevent such crimes - the second involved in similar accusations - and the president made clear he wants that behavior stopped, officials said Wednesday. Hagel spokesman George Little told reporters that Hagel's staff was working on a written directive that would spell out steps aimed at resolving a problem that has outraged lawmakers.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sexual assaults in the military are a growing epidemic across the services, and thousands of victims are still unwilling to come forward despite new oversight and assistance programs, according to a new Pentagon report. Troubling numbers estimate that up to 26,000 military members may have been sexually assaulted last year, according to survey results. The report was released Tuesday and comes just days after the Air Force's head of sexual-assault prevention was arrested on a charge of groping a woman in a Virginia parking lot. And it follows a heated debate over whether commanders should be stripped of the authority to overturn military jury verdicts, such as one officer did in a recent sexual-assault conviction.
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