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Pentagon Papers

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NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Calvin Woodward and Richard Lardner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Call it the granddaddy of WikiLeaks. Four decades ago, a young defense analyst leaked a top-secret study packed with damaging revelations about America's conduct of the Vietnam War. Monday, that study, the Pentagon Papers, finally came out in complete form. It's a touchstone for whistle-blowers everywhere and just the sort of leak that gives presidents fits to this day. Almost from the opening lines, it was apparent that the authors knew they had created a hornet's nest.
NEWS
August 8, 2006 | By Daniel Ellsberg
According to recent opinion polls, most Iraqis don't believe that we're making things better or safer in their country. What does that say about the legitimacy of prolonged occupation, much less permanent American bases in Iraq? What does it mean for continued American patrols such as the one last November in Haditha, which, we now learn, led to the deaths of a Marine and 24 unarmed civilians? Questions very much like these nagged at my conscience at the height of the Vietnam War, and led, eventually, to the publication of the Pentagon Papers in the summer of 1971, 35 years ago. As a former Marine commander and defense analyst in 1970, I had exclusive access to highly classified defense documents for research purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010
POV. THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA: DANIEL ELLSBERG. 9 tonight, Channel 12. ANYONE WHO believes the subject of "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg" is or was actually dangerous will probably avoid even watching the Oscar-nominated documentary with which PBS' "POV" wraps up its 23rd season tonight. Let's just say they don't call it "POV" - as in "point of view" - for nothing. Produced and directed by Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith, this two-hour look at the events leading up to Ellsberg's release of the classified reports about the war in Vietnam that came to be known as the Pentagon Papers is many things: a formidable history lesson, an examination of one man's crisis of conscience, an action movie for wonks, even a love story.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Martin F. Nolan, Boston Globe
White House weddings are always fun. America's barely repressed love of royalty flowered elegantly 20 years ago when a June bride named Tricia Nixon was given away by her father, the President, at her marriage in the White House Rose Garden to Edward Finch Cox. The guest list included Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover and Ralph Nader, the crusading consumerist who once employed the bridegroom. The next day, June 13, 1971, the Nixon-Cox nuptials were eclipsed in the New York Times by revelations of a study on the war in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some historical plays are all about the past, but really good ones are just as much about now. Watching Top Secret: The Battle for the Pentagon Papers, the lively L.A. Theatre Works production running this weekend at Annenberg Center's Harold Prince Theatre, I was processing Vietnam - and thinking Iraq. Top Secret vigorously maintains that the American press is not just a prodder and inciter; it has a rigorous job to do in order for democracy to work. The play is about the Washington Post's bold 1971 decision to print details from the purloined Pentagon Papers, but it resonates directly into this decade.
NEWS
July 8, 2005
THE NIXON White House, Watergate and Mark Felt, aka Deep Throat. The Vietnam War, the Pentagon Papers and a source eventually revealed as Daniel Ellsberg. In both cases, reporters protected anonymous sources because they had to. Ellsberg broke the law when he leaked the Pentagon Papers. In this business, being able to have frank but confidential conversations is paramount. That principle is now in danger because of a federal investigation into who leaked that Valerie Plame was a covert CIA agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Dubbed "the most dangerous man in America" by then-Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger, Daniel Ellsberg was responsible for the publication of the Pentagon Papers - more than 7,000 pages of top-secret documents that showed the Nixon administration (and the Johnson, Kennedy, Eisenhower, and Truman administrations before it) to be engaged in the deepest sort of deception concerning U.S. military involvement in Vietnam. In Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith's Oscar-nominated documentary, The Most Dangerous Man in America , Ellsberg recounts his own amazing cloak-and-dagger tale: how an ex-Marine, a military adviser, and government consultant connected to top officials in the White House and the Pentagon could no longer live with the lies being perpetrated on the American people.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | by Molly Ivins
Let us consider the most flagrant miscarriage of justice since the Rodney King verdict, to wit, the fact that we-the-taxpayers are about to have to pay Richard Nixon, of all people, umpteen godzillion dollars for those damn tapes (I recently promised a reader I'd try to avoid using hell and damn, but this is an emergency). This is not only not right, it stinks to high heaven. Hell. Damn. If the law is right about this one, the law is moronic. What do you mean, Nixon's tapes?
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Ellen Nakashima, Washington Post
Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old National Security Agency contractor who admitted he was behind recent leaks of classified intelligence, has vaulted from obscurity to international notoriety, joining the ranks of high-profile leakers such as Daniel Ellsberg of Pentagon Papers fame. The fact that Snowden stepped forward to acknowledge his leaks to the Washington Post and the Guardian of London rather than wait for the FBI to find him impressed others who have disclosed government secrets.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
Leonard Weinglass, 77, a crusading lawyer who championed radical and liberal causes and clients in some of the most controversial trials of the 1960s and '70s, including the Chicago Seven and Pentagon Papers cases, died Wednesday of pancreatic cancer in New York. Mr. Weinglass developed a reputation as a firebrand during the Chicago Seven conspiracy case against anti-Vietnam War demonstrators at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The defendants included Tom Hayden, Abbie Hoffman, and Jerry Rubin.
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NEWS
July 5, 2013
By Steve Frank Where Edward Snowden will end up is anyone's guess. But the fact that we are focused on that question a month after he leaked hundreds of highly classified documents about National Security Agency surveillance underscores just how much his flight has undermined his cause. How much more sympathetic he would seem if, like Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg, he had stayed put, instead of fleeing to Hong Kong, then Russia, and said: "I felt that as a responsible American citizen I could no longer cooperate in concealing this information from the public.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Ellen Nakashima, Washington Post
Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old National Security Agency contractor who admitted he was behind recent leaks of classified intelligence, has vaulted from obscurity to international notoriety, joining the ranks of high-profile leakers such as Daniel Ellsberg of Pentagon Papers fame. The fact that Snowden stepped forward to acknowledge his leaks to the Washington Post and the Guardian of London rather than wait for the FBI to find him impressed others who have disclosed government secrets.
NEWS
April 13, 2013 | By Ernesto Londoño, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - North Korea likely has a nuclear warhead small enough to fit on a ballistic missile, according to a new assessment by the Pentagon's intelligence arm that comes amid growing alarm over Pyongyang's warmongering. The conclusion by the Defense Intelligence Agency said the weapon would have "low reliability," but the disclosure during a congressional hearing Thursday is likely to raise fresh concerns about North Korea's capabilities and intentions. Rep. Doug Lamborn (R., Colo.)
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Jessica Gresko, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - He was described as the "evil genius" of the Nixon administration, and spent the better part of a year in prison for a Watergate-related conviction. His proclamations after his release, that he was a new man, redeemed by his religious faith, were met with more than skepticism by those angered at the abuses he had perpetrated as one of Richard Nixon's hatchet men. But Charles "Chuck" Colson spent the next 35 years steadfast in his efforts to evangelize to a part of society scorned just as he was. And he became known perhaps just as much for his efforts to minister to prison inmates as for his infamy with Watergate.
NEWS
June 14, 2011 | By Calvin Woodward and Richard Lardner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Call it the granddaddy of WikiLeaks. Four decades ago, a young defense analyst leaked a top-secret study packed with damaging revelations about America's conduct of the Vietnam War. Monday, that study, the Pentagon Papers, finally came out in complete form. It's a touchstone for whistle-blowers everywhere and just the sort of leak that gives presidents fits to this day. Almost from the opening lines, it was apparent that the authors knew they had created a hornet's nest.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
Leonard Weinglass, 77, a crusading lawyer who championed radical and liberal causes and clients in some of the most controversial trials of the 1960s and '70s, including the Chicago Seven and Pentagon Papers cases, died Wednesday of pancreatic cancer in New York. Mr. Weinglass developed a reputation as a firebrand during the Chicago Seven conspiracy case against anti-Vietnam War demonstrators at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The defendants included Tom Hayden, Abbie Hoffman, and Jerry Rubin.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
Ellsberg arrested at antiwar protest WASHINGTON - More than 100 antiwar protesters, including Daniel Ellsberg, the man who leaked the Pentagon Papers, were arrested outside the White House on Saturday in demonstrations marking the eighth anniversary of the U.S.-led war in Iraq. The protesters, some shouting antiwar slogans and singing "We Shall Not Be Moved," were arrested after ignoring orders to move away from the gates of the White House. Ellsberg is the former military analyst who in 1971 leaked the Pentagon's secret history of the Vietnam War. The demonstration merged varied causes, including protesters demanding a U.S. military withdrawal from Iraq and Afghanistan as well as those supporting Bradley Manning, the jailed Army private suspected of giving classified documents to the website WikiLeaks.
NEWS
October 5, 2010
The Ellen DeGeneres Show (3 p.m., NBC10) - Jenny McCarthy; Armie Hammer. Oprah Winfrey Show (4 p.m., 6ABC) - Martha Stewart. No Ordinary Family (8 p.m., 6ABC) - The Powell family members try to adjust to their new superpowers. Glee (8 p.m., Fox29) - A vision in his grilled-cheese sandwich leads Finn to an existential crisis. One Tree Hill (8 p.m., CW57) - Nathan comes to a decision about his career. POV (9 p.m., WHYY TV12) - "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers" is part profile of Ellsberg and part revisiting of the Vietnam-era controversy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010
POV. THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA: DANIEL ELLSBERG. 9 tonight, Channel 12. ANYONE WHO believes the subject of "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg" is or was actually dangerous will probably avoid even watching the Oscar-nominated documentary with which PBS' "POV" wraps up its 23rd season tonight. Let's just say they don't call it "POV" - as in "point of view" - for nothing. Produced and directed by Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith, this two-hour look at the events leading up to Ellsberg's release of the classified reports about the war in Vietnam that came to be known as the Pentagon Papers is many things: a formidable history lesson, an examination of one man's crisis of conscience, an action movie for wonks, even a love story.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Dubbed "the most dangerous man in America" by then-Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger, Daniel Ellsberg was responsible for the publication of the Pentagon Papers - more than 7,000 pages of top-secret documents that showed the Nixon administration (and the Johnson, Kennedy, Eisenhower, and Truman administrations before it) to be engaged in the deepest sort of deception concerning U.S. military involvement in Vietnam. In Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith's Oscar-nominated documentary, The Most Dangerous Man in America , Ellsberg recounts his own amazing cloak-and-dagger tale: how an ex-Marine, a military adviser, and government consultant connected to top officials in the White House and the Pentagon could no longer live with the lies being perpetrated on the American people.
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