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Penzance

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The director of The Pirates of Penzance at the Puttin' on the Ritz Theater says he wanted to recreate the spirit of Gilbert and Sullivan in his production. While it is difficult, 119 years after the operetta premiered, to appreciate just what that "spirit" might have been, you suspect, as you watch this light and amusing, well-performed entertainment, that director Art McKenzie has gotten it right. There is not a serious or respectful moment in this consistently humorous production.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | BARBARA JOHNSTON / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Michael Tunney is the center of attention as the Pirate King in Gilbert and Sullivan's "Pirates of Penzance. " The Savoy Company of Philadelphia's Traveling Troupe performed the operetta yesterday at the 20th Century Club in Lansdowne.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
About 50 live concerts, theatrical productions, dance performances and children's shows, ranging from a musical evening with jazz notable Wynton Marsalis to a production of Dickens' A Christmas Carol, will be presented through June 1990 at Glassboro State College as part of the initial season of the Glassboro Center for the Arts. The Center for the Arts was established in October to bring in artists to the college. It also coordinates the artistic offerings - such as Ballet South and the Stageworks Theater Company - that the college already has, said Michael Rose, executive director of center.
NEWS
October 28, 2007 | By Ed Mahon FOR THE INQUIRER
Bruce Bogdanoff called 12 members of the Rose Valley Chorus & Orchestra to order by playing "Pour, O Pour the Pirate Sherry" on the piano. The men - who had been talking, putting their coats down, picking up sword and hat props - broke into song, puffed up their chests, and swaggered as only men of the high seas can. "OK, let's just go through the music right now," Robin Greene said to start the rehearsal. The retired medical technologist from King of Prussia has been involved with the theater group since the 1960s, and like other members, has many W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan songs memorized.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Emboldened by the London success of their HMS Pinafore but outraged at the rogue American productions that robbed them of royalties, Gilbert & Sullivan opened Pirates of Penzance in 1879 in New York to secure the U.S. copyright. Good thing, too, as it was another hit, skewering so many targets that it's best not to ask what pirates, virginal Victorian maidens, and mustachioed London police are doing in the same operetta. So all that the new Bristol Riverside Theatre production asks is that you sit back and enjoy the romp while it touches all sorts of satirical bases in one of the company's big-cast, big-budget productions of the season.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By Georgia Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The hero of The Pirates of Penzance was mistakenly apprenticed to a pirate band until his 21st birthday. When he turned 21, he found that the fine print in his contract - based on a quirk that had to do with leap years - required him to stay a pirate for 60 more years. Since 1992 is a leap year, the Gilbert and Sullivan Society of Chester County will perform the comic opera this Thursday, Friday and Saturday with 40 singers and full orchestra, at West Chester University's Philip Memorial Hall.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the curtains go up for The Pirates of Penzance tomorrow night, it will be a milestone for Edward R. Hallowell and The Haverford School. It will be the 10th Gilbert and Sullivan operetta to be directed by Hallowell and performed at the private preparatory school for boys. It marks another occassion for Hallowell, 40, chairman of the upper school's English department: It will be his 20th presentation of the 19th- century theater pieces. "I get enormous joy in watching kids put on a demanding show and do it so well," Hallowell said.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some people who know them may not realize this, but Jeremy and Annie Frey are perfect. Only the lack of a BMW separates them from being classic Yuppies, right out of thirtysomething. Patrons of the arts, they are good-looking, talented and live in a well-furnished townhouse near Rittenhouse Square in Philadelphia. He's a federal prosecutor in Camden. She pulls down a hefty salary selling industrial wax. And that's in real life. But in their case, it's hard to tell if life imitates art or whether it's the other way around.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | By S.E. Siebert, FOR THE INQUIRER
Backstage was a mix of adrenalin and jitters. Actors fussed with their faces, checked their coiffed tresses, and adjusted suspenders on their lederhosen. It was a dress rehearsal before the performance of their lives. On Tuesday, the players will be in Buxton, England, to participate in the First International Gilbert and Sullivan Festival. For members of the area's Savoy Opera Company, the trip is a pilgrimage. The nearly century-old Philadelphia-area group is founded on the 19th-century works of Sir William Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan.
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NEWS
April 12, 2013
SHOE BIZ? Show biz? What's the difference? Not much, according to Benjamin Lovell , and he should know. By day, the 62-year-old York, England, native and current Wilmington, Del., resident is the founder of the five-store Benjamin Lovell Shoes chain. By night (and weekends), he is a veteran of local stages, including that of the Walnut Street Theatre, where his current five-year run as Ebenezer Scrooge in "A Christmas Carol" has made him a yuletide tradition of sorts hereabouts. There are "not a lot" of differences, offered Lovell (pronounced LOVE-ull)
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Emboldened by the London success of their HMS Pinafore but outraged at the rogue American productions that robbed them of royalties, Gilbert & Sullivan opened Pirates of Penzance in 1879 in New York to secure the U.S. copyright. Good thing, too, as it was another hit, skewering so many targets that it's best not to ask what pirates, virginal Victorian maidens, and mustachioed London police are doing in the same operetta. So all that the new Bristol Riverside Theatre production asks is that you sit back and enjoy the romp while it touches all sorts of satirical bases in one of the company's big-cast, big-budget productions of the season.
NEWS
October 28, 2007 | By Ed Mahon FOR THE INQUIRER
Bruce Bogdanoff called 12 members of the Rose Valley Chorus & Orchestra to order by playing "Pour, O Pour the Pirate Sherry" on the piano. The men - who had been talking, putting their coats down, picking up sword and hat props - broke into song, puffed up their chests, and swaggered as only men of the high seas can. "OK, let's just go through the music right now," Robin Greene said to start the rehearsal. The retired medical technologist from King of Prussia has been involved with the theater group since the 1960s, and like other members, has many W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan songs memorized.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | by Bruce Montgomery, For the Daily News
With so many biographical movies taking great liberties with the truth (see "The Hurricane" or "JFK") the Daily News asked Gilbert and Sullivan expert Bruce Montgomery to vet "Topsy-Turvy" for both rhyme and reason. "Topsy-Turvy" writer-director Mike Leigh would have made a good many Gilbert and Sullivan aficionados happy had he included scenes from "H.M.S. Pinafore," "The Pirates of Penzance" or "The Yeomen of the Guard. " Instead, he chose a three-year chunk out of the G&S saga, showing us only 1883 to 1885.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | BARBARA JOHNSTON / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Michael Tunney is the center of attention as the Pirate King in Gilbert and Sullivan's "Pirates of Penzance. " The Savoy Company of Philadelphia's Traveling Troupe performed the operetta yesterday at the 20th Century Club in Lansdowne.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia, from what we can tell, was never a hotbed of pirates. We're known more for our bluebloods than our blackbeards. Today, though, the Independence Seaport Museum at Penn's Landing is raising the Jolly Roger on "Under the Black Flag: Life Among the Pirates," a multimedia exhibition organized by the South Street Seaport Museum in New York and curated by pirate-life author David Cordingly. It will be here through mid-August. A pirate-theme opening party, complete with treasure hunt, crafts, snacks and prizes, will begin at 1 p.m. Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1998 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The director of The Pirates of Penzance at the Puttin' on the Ritz Theater says he wanted to recreate the spirit of Gilbert and Sullivan in his production. While it is difficult, 119 years after the operetta premiered, to appreciate just what that "spirit" might have been, you suspect, as you watch this light and amusing, well-performed entertainment, that director Art McKenzie has gotten it right. There is not a serious or respectful moment in this consistently humorous production.
NEWS
July 31, 1994 | By S.E. Siebert, FOR THE INQUIRER
Backstage was a mix of adrenalin and jitters. Actors fussed with their faces, checked their coiffed tresses, and adjusted suspenders on their lederhosen. It was a dress rehearsal before the performance of their lives. On Tuesday, the players will be in Buxton, England, to participate in the First International Gilbert and Sullivan Festival. For members of the area's Savoy Opera Company, the trip is a pilgrimage. The nearly century-old Philadelphia-area group is founded on the 19th-century works of Sir William Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By Georgia Ashby, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The hero of The Pirates of Penzance was mistakenly apprenticed to a pirate band until his 21st birthday. When he turned 21, he found that the fine print in his contract - based on a quirk that had to do with leap years - required him to stay a pirate for 60 more years. Since 1992 is a leap year, the Gilbert and Sullivan Society of Chester County will perform the comic opera this Thursday, Friday and Saturday with 40 singers and full orchestra, at West Chester University's Philip Memorial Hall.
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