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Pepper Spray

NEWS
January 21, 2005 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
With obscenity-yelling, flag-burning protesters behind him, and tear-gas-spraying, riot-geared police in front of him, Justin Shenk just wanted to make peace. So the 21-year-old native of Akron, Lancaster County, knelt down in front of an eight-foot black metal security fence with his back to the historic and posh Willard Hotel. He bowed his head, clasped his hands and prayed. Alone. And then the police from behind the fence doused him with pepper spray. They tossed icy water and more pepper spray.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Terence Chea, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - The University of California has agreed to pay $1 million to settle a lawsuit filed by demonstrators who were pepper-sprayed during an Occupy protest at UC Davis last fall, according to a preliminary settlement filed Wednesday. The Nov. 18 incident drew national outrage, angry campus protests, and calls for the resignation of chancellor Linda Katehi after online videos shot by witnesses went viral. Images of a police officer casually spraying orange pepper spray in the faces of nonviolent protesters became a rallying symbol for the Occupy Wall Street movement.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Mark Fazlollah contributed to this article
The blackjack - a small, leather-covered sap with a flexible handle carried by Philadelphia police for more than a century - is heading into oblivion. Blackjacks, which many police departments across the country did away with long ago, will be phased out as part of an officer's uniform. In fact, Class 323, which graduated yesterday from the Police Academy, was the first class to be issued pepper spray, a tool technically known as oleoresin capsicum that commanders believe is far more effective and safer in disabling someone than a blackjack.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Falls Township police arrived at the Village of Newport apartments one day in March, they found a tense scene. A man had slashed both his wrists and was holding two knives, threatening to hurt anyone who came near. Police, a minister and the man's wife were in danger. After an hourlong standoff, the officers talked the man into putting down the knives without incident. But had the man lunged, police might have had to use deadly force. "When I read the (police)
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A WOMAN WHO had been banned from an Upper Darby dollar store doused store employees with pepper spray as they tried to escort her out on Monday, and when they tackled her to the ground, she gave the spray can to her 7-year-old daughter and told her to finish the fight, police said. " 'You know what to do, baby. Spray it!' " Delaina Garling allegedly told her daughter. The alleged actions of this early contender for mother of the year follow on the heels of another woman who was arrested in Upper Darby last week for allegedly forcing her daughter to fight another girl.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one of two videotapes being flashed all over the country, four female protesters sit on an office floor, arms locked together in steel sleeves so that police cannot easily separate them. One woman screams as a policeman yanks her head back by the hair. Then another policeman squirts pepper spray from close range into her eyes. Use of pepper spray in two recent logging sit-ins has generated considerable controversy in California - now that lawyers for the protesters are showing videotapes of the arrests taken by the Northern California sheriff's office that used the spray.
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | By Richard Jones and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Nineteen people were taken to area hospitals yesterday after someone at a South Philadelphia elementary school set off a canister of Mace or pepper spray that triggered a spell of watery eyes, nausea and coughing that forced the school's evacuation. The incident, at the Southwark Elementary School at Ninth and Mifflin Streets, occurred around 1:30 p.m. yesterday and sent 17 students and two staffers to three hospitals, police said. None of the injuries was serious, and all of those who were hurt were treated and released.
NEWS
July 31, 1997 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five Middletown police officers know from experience that pepper spray works. Their eyes were burned from the spray over the weekend as they tried to subdue a prisoner. The officers were injured while trying to control a prisoner who broke free of a shackle in police headquarters, police said. The officers involved were Sgt. Robert Burnett and Officers David Denton, Charles Burdick, Dennis Kyzinski and Michael Marks. All of them were treated for eye irritations and minor injuries and released at St. Mary Medical Center.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Responding to warnings that the pepper spray wielded by Philadelphia police can be deadly, Police Commissioner Richard Neal has tightened controls on use of the debilitating spray. Officers carrying the spray, which stings the eyes and drives people to their knees in convulsive coughing, are getting briefings on its potential dangers, a Police Department spokesman said yesterday. And a recent directive from Neal instructs officers not to use the spray against nonviolent suspects, orderly crowds, children, the elderly, pregnant women or people believed to be suffering from heart or respiratory problems.
NEWS
December 30, 1996 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the wedding from hell: The bride's father got into an argument with the disc jockey. Two guests who had been drinking at the reception started pushing each other. Someone called 911. When he arrived at the Collegeville Inn, police officer James C. Rupell took one look at the scene, whipped out a can of Bodyguard pepper spray, held it above the crowd, and began spraying in a sweeping motion, Rupell testified later. A pregnant woman doubled over, children screamed, and guests streamed out of the basement reception hall coughing and rubbing their eyes and faces, according to testimony from witnesses at the 1993 wedding.
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