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NEWS
February 11, 1986 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
About 60 percent and in some cases more than 70 percent of Philadelphia public elementary school pupils scored below the national average on reading and math in citywide tests given over the past two years. Philadelphia school officials yesterday released the results of tests that were given to roughly 100,400 children in grades one through eight in December 1984 and again in November 1985. The tests, which replaced the California Achievement Test, were designed to test what pupils were taught under the standardized curriculum that went into effect in fall 1984.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | By Julie Blair, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
State test scores for high school juniors in the Pennsbury School District dropped significantly this year over last year, and school officials aren't sure why. The Pennsylvania System of School Assessment ranked Pennsbury juniors in the 70th percentile in reading this year, down from the 90th percentile in 1996. In math, they ranked in the 68th percentile this year, compared to the 87th percentile in 1996. The test has been taken annually since 1995 and measures the reading and math abilities of students in grades 5, 8 and 11. Scores for the fifth and eighth graders either held constant or increased.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Standardized-test scores for township students have risen to a new level, school officials say. District scores on the California Achievement Tests hit an all-time high this year, averaging between the 94th and 96th percentiles. The tests are administered to students in grades one through seven. Last year, the district scored in the 92d percentile overall. Percentiles are determined by comparing the district's scores with those in other districts. District spokeswoman Geri Egizi Borbe said this year's test was more challenging than ever.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ninth- and 10th-grade students in the Philadelphia area's Catholic schools improved their scores this academic year on standardized reading and math tests, and most of their results remain well above the national average. The results are scheduled to be released today by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. "We're really happy with the scores," Robert H. Palestini, superintendent of Catholic schools, said yesterday. "They have increased every year they (students) have taken them, but this particular year we have had the highest increase in the ninth grade ever.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | By Judy DeHaven, Special to The Inquirer
Students in the Upper Merion School District have strong math skills, but fourth graders may need to improve their word-study skills, according to 1990 standardized test results in the district. In October, students in grades 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10 were given the Stanford Achievement Test and the Otis-Lennon School Ability Test. The results, which tested a range of skills, including reading, math, English, spelling, science and social science, compared the students' achievement with their aptitude.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Frank Lawlor, Special to The Inquirer
Springfield students in three grades have upheld the district's high batting average in standardized tests. The district's fourth, sixth and 10th graders took the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills in the fall. During the school board's meeting Thursday, members were told that Springfield students scored at or above the 73rd percentile in all but three categories, sixth-grade spelling (69th percentile) and 10th-grade reading (66th) and spelling (67th). The highest single percentile was 84, scored by fourth graders in social studies.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Northeast teenager with allergies that prevented him from attending school for almost two years will enter ninth grade at Lincoln High School this fall, according to his parents and school officials. His allergies, however, will prevent Jason Rush, 14, from attending summer school at Northeast High School - forcing him to spend an extra year in high school to graduate, his parents found out last week. After court proceedings in April, Common Pleas Court Judge Edward Summers ordered the Philadelphia School District to give Jason academic tests to determine if he would be ready for ninth grade at Lincoln this fall.
NEWS
March 2, 2006 | By Paul Krugman
Ben Bernanke's maiden congressional testimony as chairman of the Federal Reserve was, everyone agrees, superb. He didn't put a foot wrong on monetary or fiscal policy. But Bernanke did stumble at one point. Responding to a question from Rep. Barney Frank (D., Mass.) about income inequality, he declared that "the most important factor" in rising inequality "is the rising skill premium, the increased return to education. " That's a fundamental misreading of what's happening to American society.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eighth graders enrolled in area Catholic elementary schools scored well above national averages on standardized tests administered last fall, and their scores have increased by nearly 9 percentile points since they took a similar test in the sixth grade. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia was scheduled to release the results of the California Achievement Test today showing that, overall, eighth graders scored at the 73.8 percentile on the reading, language and math portions of the exam.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The fate of the nine-year-old Thanksgiving football rivalry between Methacton and Perkiomen Valley High Schools will remain in limbo for a while, possibly until February. Methacton Superintendent Laird P. Warner said at Tuesday night's school board work session that the board was waiting for staff suggestions. The schools will continue to play one another; at issue is when. "The high school principal (Frank Cogdon) and athletic director (David Kyler) will be talking to the staff and then come back with recommendations about changing the date," he said.
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REAL_ESTATE
April 28, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Trulia, the real-estate search engine, has been doing some interesting research - most recently, on the rise in income inequality in the nation's 100 largest metropolitan areas. To compile a list of the most unequal metro areas, Trulia used U.S. Census data on household income - which I also use, to determine median income for my weekly "Town by Town" columns in Sunday Business - in addition to its own statistics on housing affordability. What Trulia said about this region should come as no surprise: Philadelphia, poorest of the 10 largest U.S. metro areas, is among the country's most affordable areas for housing.
NEWS
March 2, 2006 | By Paul Krugman
Ben Bernanke's maiden congressional testimony as chairman of the Federal Reserve was, everyone agrees, superb. He didn't put a foot wrong on monetary or fiscal policy. But Bernanke did stumble at one point. Responding to a question from Rep. Barney Frank (D., Mass.) about income inequality, he declared that "the most important factor" in rising inequality "is the rising skill premium, the increased return to education. " That's a fundamental misreading of what's happening to American society.
NEWS
October 8, 2003
More consideration needed for Haverford site The recent editorial cheering on the rush to development at the Haverford State Hospital tract misses the mark by a wide margin ("Filling in the Inner Ring: A way to curb sprawl," Sept. 29). Haverford Township is already full of residential development. It has no large park space, only pocket parks and school ball fields that are overflowing with sports activity. Other first-ring suburbs are already suffering decline, partly due to a lack of amenities.
NEWS
January 9, 2003 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although the Philadelphia School District is using a new test, there were no surprises in the first round of results released yesterday: Students still scored well below the national average in reading, math and science. "I'm not surprised by these results," said Chief Executive Paul Vallas, who has been at the helm for six months. "We knew that we had a great deal of work ahead of us when the academic year started in order to close the gap between where our children are academically and where they ought to be. " With 128,000 students tested in grades three through 10, the new test - the Terra Nova - was the most widely administered test in district history, officials said.
NEWS
December 8, 1997 | By Julie Blair, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
State test scores for high school juniors in the Pennsbury School District dropped significantly this year over last year, and school officials aren't sure why. The Pennsylvania System of School Assessment ranked Pennsbury juniors in the 70th percentile in reading this year, down from the 90th percentile in 1996. In math, they ranked in the 68th percentile this year, compared to the 87th percentile in 1996. The test has been taken annually since 1995 and measures the reading and math abilities of students in grades 5, 8 and 11. Scores for the fifth and eighth graders either held constant or increased.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Administrators studying testing in the Council Rock School District have discovered a phenomenon. They call it the "Lake Wobegon effect," after humorist Garrison Keillor's fictional hometown, where "all the children are above average. " The effect shows up frequently in results of district achievement testing. Large numbers of Council Rock students regularly record top scores. But that has a downside - one that administrators hope to correct. With scores largely in the top percentile, the 11,600-student district has trouble distinguishing students who are doing well from those who need help, said Robert James, the district's acting director of secondary education.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Standardized-test scores for township students have risen to a new level, school officials say. District scores on the California Achievement Tests hit an all-time high this year, averaging between the 94th and 96th percentiles. The tests are administered to students in grades one through seven. Last year, the district scored in the 92d percentile overall. Percentiles are determined by comparing the district's scores with those in other districts. District spokeswoman Geri Egizi Borbe said this year's test was more challenging than ever.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The fate of the nine-year-old Thanksgiving football rivalry between Methacton and Perkiomen Valley High Schools will remain in limbo for a while, possibly until February. Methacton Superintendent Laird P. Warner said at Tuesday night's school board work session that the board was waiting for staff suggestions. The schools will continue to play one another; at issue is when. "The high school principal (Frank Cogdon) and athletic director (David Kyler) will be talking to the staff and then come back with recommendations about changing the date," he said.
NEWS
November 23, 1993 | by Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
A standardized achievement test does so badly at measuring the skills of first- and second-graders that the School District is going to abandon it for the primary grades, a district official said yesterday. David W. Hunt told the Board of Education that the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills was administered to the city's more than 200,000 public-school children in June 1992 and June 1993. Yesterday's presentation was designed "to allow the board to make an assessment on how much can we trust standardized achievement tests," Hunt said.
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