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Perfect Man

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NEWS
February 9, 1998 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
He seemed like the perfect man when she met him in the strip club. Beautifully dressed. Well-mannered. Intelligent? Why, yes. He was a lawyer, wasn't he? Craig Rabinowitz seemed like "the perfect man trapped in an unhappy marriage," said Shannon Reinert, the dancer known as Summer, in an interview with the TV show "American Journal" to be aired Wednesday on KYW-TV (Channel 3). Rabinowitz, of course, violently ended that marriage last April 29 by strangling his wife, Stefanie, 29, in the bathtub of their Merion home while their baby daughter slept in an adjoining room.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2005 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time there were made-for-television movies. Now there are made-for-television movies for movie theaters. The Perfect Man, another anemic Hilary Duff vehicle, is a case in point. This project is so misguided as to cast TV vixen Heather Locklear as a sweet, working-class victim in jeans(!), when everyone knows she owns the market on shrewish executrix mansharks in toast-size skirts. Nobody dumps Locklear. Yet, in The Perfect Man, she's perennially dumped and desperate.
NEWS
June 7, 2016
IF YOU WANT to remember Ali in your own special way, then stop right here. If you revere him or if you revile him, and if you want to entrench yourself, that is your right. Muhammad Ali led a varied life in trying times, a life that justifies almost any sort of judgment. Otherwise . . . When a great man dies, we tend to simplify what and who he was. We generally prefer to focus on fond recollections; or, if we found him lacking, we quickly dismiss him. The problem with Ali is, he was just so complicated.
NEWS
May 28, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Frothy as a Margarita and just as salty, Sex and the City all but mambos its way onto the screen. The one about the four friends who formerly sought the perfect man and now, more or less happily attached, seek the perfect apartment may well be the most effervescent film fantasy since Beauty and the Beast. As almost everyone knows, the Sex 's heroines are bosom buds who imbibe without getting tipsy, eat without gaining weight, enjoy sex without spreading STDs, shop without maxing out credit cards and offer mutual support without (intentional)
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Self magazine and Inquirer wire services
A NON-WHITE CHRISTMAS It's the day after Labor Day, so it's time to begin thinking about Christmas, right? Well, some of you might have heard distressing rumors that the U.S. Postal Service wants to ban colored Christmas-card envelopes. It is true that white envelopes are easier for new automatic letter-sorting equipment to handle. But postal officials promise that if you buy cards that come with envelopes that are red or green or some other color, they will happily deliver them.
SPORTS
May 25, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Hal McRae, whose aggressive, hard-nosed style personified Kansas City baseball during its successful decade from the mid-70s to the mid-80s, was named the Royals' manager yesterday. McRae, whose son Brian starts in center field for the Royals, succeeds John Wathan, who was fired Wednesday with the Royals in last place in the American League West. McRae, who was the Montreal Expos' hitting coach before accepting a position he turned down in 1987, said he was eager but nervous.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a scene in Suddenly, Last Summer when aesthete Sebastian is torn apart and consumed by a roving band of boys. That's how Kristen Stewart feels. The Twilight star, who admitted she two-timed vampiric dreamboat Robert Pattinson , 26, with Some Middle Aged Guy , tells British Vogue she's taken a P.R. beating. The problem, she says, is the expectation that celebs should always seem perfect. "I know if you haven't thought about how you want to present a very packaged idea of yourself, it can seem like you lack ambition," she says.
NEWS
August 20, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Before all the boxes in his new home were unpacked, Stephen Mikalic went to his new neighbor's house, knocked on the door, shook the hand of the man who answered, and told him that he had the use of Mikalic's pickup truck should he ever need it. "He always left his keys in the truck, in case someone needed to borrow it," said Diane Mazzacano, Mikalic's wife of six years, remembering the couple's June move to Cherry Hill. "He was the perfect man - perfect husband, perfect son-in-law, perfect everything.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | By Chris Morkides, Special to The Inquirer
When Brian Henesey played football at Radnor High, he could have won an award as best supporting football player. Oh, Henesey compiled statistics worthy of a leading man. He rushed for nearly 1,000 yards as a senior fullback and was an all-league defensive back. But Henesey didn't get the attention given to Radnor's top ground-gainer and game-breaker, tailback Michael Hopson. Henesey is getting plenty of attention at Bucknell University, however. The Bucknell senior tailback entered the season needing only 37 yards to become the third player in Bisons history to rush for 2,000 yards in his career and only 660 yards to become Bucknell's all-time rushing leader.
NEWS
May 29, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Frothy as a Margarita and just as salty, Sex and the City all but mambos its way onto the screen. The one about the four friends who formerly sought the perfect man and now, more or less happily attached, seek the perfect apartment may well be the most effervescent film fantasy since Beauty and the Beast. As almost everyone knows, Sex's heroines are bosom buds who imbibe without getting tipsy, eat without gaining weight, enjoy sex without spreading STDs, shop without maxing out credit cards, and offer mutual support without (intentional)
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NEWS
June 7, 2016
IF YOU WANT to remember Ali in your own special way, then stop right here. If you revere him or if you revile him, and if you want to entrench yourself, that is your right. Muhammad Ali led a varied life in trying times, a life that justifies almost any sort of judgment. Otherwise . . . When a great man dies, we tend to simplify what and who he was. We generally prefer to focus on fond recollections; or, if we found him lacking, we quickly dismiss him. The problem with Ali is, he was just so complicated.
SPORTS
January 1, 2013 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Jeffrey Lurie spent the first five minutes of his news conference on Monday describing the perfect head coach for the Philadelphia Eagles, or for any NFL team. The perfect man for the job is "not only an outstanding coach, but an outstanding person," according to Lurie. He is "dedicated, has an incredible work ethic and incredible ability to work with others. " He is "smart," would earn the "love and respect of every individual in this organization," and, in short, is a "gem. " Of course, Lurie was describing the guy he had just fired, not the one he will hire to replace Andy Reid.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a scene in Suddenly, Last Summer when aesthete Sebastian is torn apart and consumed by a roving band of boys. That's how Kristen Stewart feels. The Twilight star, who admitted she two-timed vampiric dreamboat Robert Pattinson , 26, with Some Middle Aged Guy , tells British Vogue she's taken a P.R. beating. The problem, she says, is the expectation that celebs should always seem perfect. "I know if you haven't thought about how you want to present a very packaged idea of yourself, it can seem like you lack ambition," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Frothy as a Margarita and just as salty, Sex and the City all but mambos its way onto the screen. The one about the four friends who formerly sought the perfect man and now, more or less happily attached, seek the perfect apartment may well be the most effervescent film fantasy since Beauty and the Beast. As almost everyone knows, the Sex's heroines are bosom buds who imbibe without getting tipsy, eat without gaining weight, enjoy sex (almost) without STDs, shop without maxing out credit cards and offer mutual support without (intentional)
NEWS
May 29, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Frothy as a Margarita and just as salty, Sex and the City all but mambos its way onto the screen. The one about the four friends who formerly sought the perfect man and now, more or less happily attached, seek the perfect apartment may well be the most effervescent film fantasy since Beauty and the Beast. As almost everyone knows, Sex's heroines are bosom buds who imbibe without getting tipsy, eat without gaining weight, enjoy sex without spreading STDs, shop without maxing out credit cards, and offer mutual support without (intentional)
NEWS
May 28, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Frothy as a Margarita and just as salty, Sex and the City all but mambos its way onto the screen. The one about the four friends who formerly sought the perfect man and now, more or less happily attached, seek the perfect apartment may well be the most effervescent film fantasy since Beauty and the Beast. As almost everyone knows, the Sex 's heroines are bosom buds who imbibe without getting tipsy, eat without gaining weight, enjoy sex without spreading STDs, shop without maxing out credit cards and offer mutual support without (intentional)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2005 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time there were made-for-television movies. Now there are made-for-television movies for movie theaters. The Perfect Man, another anemic Hilary Duff vehicle, is a case in point. This project is so misguided as to cast TV vixen Heather Locklear as a sweet, working-class victim in jeans(!), when everyone knows she owns the market on shrewish executrix mansharks in toast-size skirts. Nobody dumps Locklear. Yet, in The Perfect Man, she's perennially dumped and desperate.
NEWS
August 20, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Before all the boxes in his new home were unpacked, Stephen Mikalic went to his new neighbor's house, knocked on the door, shook the hand of the man who answered, and told him that he had the use of Mikalic's pickup truck should he ever need it. "He always left his keys in the truck, in case someone needed to borrow it," said Diane Mazzacano, Mikalic's wife of six years, remembering the couple's June move to Cherry Hill. "He was the perfect man - perfect husband, perfect son-in-law, perfect everything.
NEWS
December 7, 1999 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Television Critic
You've seen his face - not to mention his arms and legs - somewhere before. Every Friday and Saturday night, that's him, spread-eagled, in the opening credits of CBS's "Now and Again" and NBC's "The Pretender. " That's him, too, on the local news, dressing up the logo for the KYW (Channel 3) medical feature, "Eye on Health. " Before he was on KYW, he was the health-beat poster boy for WTXF (Channel 29). Trapped forever inside a circle and a square, he's all over the World Wide Web, helping to sell everything from athletic supporters to cell phones.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
He seemed like the perfect man when she met him in the strip club. Beautifully dressed. Well-mannered. Intelligent? Why, yes. He was a lawyer, wasn't he? Craig Rabinowitz seemed like "the perfect man trapped in an unhappy marriage," said Shannon Reinert, the dancer known as Summer, in an interview with the TV show "American Journal" to be aired Wednesday on KYW-TV (Channel 3). Rabinowitz, of course, violently ended that marriage last April 29 by strangling his wife, Stefanie, 29, in the bathtub of their Merion home while their baby daughter slept in an adjoining room.
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