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Performance Art

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NEWS
February 7, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Richard Jordan is a sculptor who wanted to decry what he perceived to be the systematic exclusion of black artists like himself from mainstream culture. Such a statement can't be made through sculpture, so Jordan decided to convey his message through a performance piece. He called it Missing Transparencies, a reference to the fact that slides of his work are regularly misplaced by museums and galleries. The title implies that the slides are deliberately "lost" as part of an institutional conspiracy against minority artists.
NEWS
October 15, 1990 | By Miriam Seidel, Special to The Inquirer
The engaging premise of the multifaceted electronic arts festival called the Electrical Matter is that today's video, synthesized sound and other electronic media implicitly honor Benjamin Franklin the electrical experimenter. The festival's participating artists are free to choose whether to relate their commissioned works to Franklin's many talents. On the video/performance bill presented over the weekend at International House, co-produced by the Neighborhood Film and Video Project, Scott Alburger offered some Franklin- related meditations while Jessie Jane Lewis presented works that derived from her own concerns.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
If it were you, in your house, with your family, how would the dance end up? What would you say? Would you reach for your crown molding, or sway with your mate in front of the fridge? Would you even let Amy Smith and Andrew Simonet of Headlong Dance Theater anywhere near your front door to create a performance out of your family's life and your living-room mess? And how about the 10 paying audience members who are scooping up tickets to see four Philly families do exactly that?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
A grunting, chicken-cackling saxophone player; a monologist with a hundred voices; a spidery-thin dancer with red fingers; and a film about spinning - this is not a vaudeville show that MTI Tabernacle Theater is presenting through Sunday. The people in the program fall under the intentionally hazy rubric of performance art, and they all have found a steady outlet for their unique talents at an experimental theater in New York called P.S. 122. The show at MTI, called P.S. 122 Field Trips, offers a representative sampling of some of the big names on the fringe.
NEWS
November 25, 1993 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The students' project is ambitious: designing a giant Monopoly game, with real people moving around the board, to raise the community's awareness of homelessness. The idea behind the performance piece is to make people realize how easily the comfort and stability of a home can be lost. Last week, 15 of the Jenkintown High School students working on the project gathered for a brainstorming session with their art teacher, Virginia McKenna. To prepare for the performance in January, they had to answer questions such as these: Should images of homeless people be flashed by a hidden slide projector onto the game board or onto the scoreboard of the gymnasium, where the performance will take place?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Karen Finley walked onstage at the Painted Bride Art Center two months ago, she shed most of her clothing during the course of her performance, smeared her body with chocolate and sprinkled it with alfalfa sprouts and glitter. The performance created an unholy mess. At first, the audience laughed, amused to see an adult playing with food the way kids are told never, never to do. But as Finley's multiple monologues continued, as she became infused with the personae of an abused woman, an alcoholic mother, a dying AIDS victim, the mess became emblematic of the mess American society has made of whole segments of the population.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Here's a quick multiple choice. Performance art is: (a) a woman who covers herself with chocolate, alfalfa sprouts and glitter while delivering high-intensity monologues on sexual abuse, alcoholism and AIDS. (b) a man who combines physical comedy with an existentialist edge in a breakneck series of solo character sketches. (c) an unruly art form that's been at the center of a national debate about public funding for the arts, threatening to bring down the National Endowment for the Arts since 1989, when Sen. Jesse Helms (R., N.C.)
NEWS
June 9, 2006 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Pew Charitable Trusts has named this year's recipients of the Pew Fellowships in the Arts - a $50,000 "no-strings-attached" grant that artists can spend in any way they choose. This year's recipients, selected from among nearly 300 aspirants, are: In performance art, David Brick, Andrew Simonet and Amy Smith, as a collaborative team (sharing $50,000); Tobin Rothlein; Robert Smythe; Geoffrey Sobelle. In poetry, Nava EtShalom, Jena Osman, Bob Perelman, Lamont Steptoe and Elaine Terranova.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2010 | By HOWARD GENSLER, gensleh@phillynews.com 215-854-5678
ADULT FILM stars Marilyn Chambers, Traci Lords and Ginger Lynn all had varying degrees of success transitioning into mainstream acting careers, but Sasha Grey may soon be the first porn star to become a crossover star. One thing in her favor is that porn essentially is mainstream now - available in massive quantities on any home computer. Grey is also versatile and introspective - good qualities in an actress - and she's already starred in "The Girlfriend Experience," for director Steven Soderbergh.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
TRYING TO FIGURE OUT a "sculpture" that moves at 30th Street Station are Nicholas Thomson, 5, (left) and Elijah Florence, 6. The performance art, sponsored by the Painted Bride Art Center, was designed by Harold Olejarz and titled "The Commuters/Men in Suits. " Five people wore the sculpture suits and interacted with commuters yesterday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 24, 2014
THE VARIETY of content conjured by the region's theater community is breathtaking. But on the other side of the footlights, diversity isn't nearly as prevalent. The audience at any production, from a world-premiere drama to a touring Broadway musical, is overwhelmingly baby boomers and people old enough to be their parents. While some established local theater types wring their hands over this, an 18-year-old theatrical rookie is taking action. Norristown-based New Cavern Productions was established last year to stimulate young people's interest in theater with original and adapted productions that play to youthful interests.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terence Nance is here, Philadelphia. Let him introduce himself. The multitalented Nance has two films playing here during the next week. On Friday, his first feature-length, full-release film, An Oversimplification of Her Beauty , opened at the Ritz at the Bourse. (He'll be on hand for two Q&As on Saturday and one on Sunday.) A second Nance film, The Triptych , codirected with photographer Barron Claiborne, plays at 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Oversimplification is a bristling, funny, introspective, meta-meta-meta-examination of a love affair.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
PHILLY.COM is expanding its Philadelphia arts coverage with the launch of digital content from Art Attack, which was created out of a partnership between Drexel University's Center for Cultural Outreach and the Daily News , it was announced Thursday. Art Attack's coverage of local artists includes musicians, world music, film, theater, dance and classical, contemporary and performance art in Philadelphia communities. "Our new partnership with Art Attack will allow us to provide our readers with even more extensive coverage on the widest array of arts in Philadelphia," said Lexie Norcross, vice president of digital operations and director of Interstate General Media, parent company of Philly.com.
NEWS
February 15, 2013 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Daily News Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
THE PHILADELPHIA Live Arts Festival and Philly Fringe isn't just for the fall anymore. Beginning Friday, Live Arts will host programs all year, starting with "The Robot-Human Theater," a collaboration between Japan's Seinendan Theater Company and Osaka University's Intelligent Robotics Laboratory. The evening consists of two short plays starring both robot and human actors: "I, Worker" about a robot that loses its ability to work due to a mental illness, and "Sayonara," the tale of an android that reads a poem to a dying person.
NEWS
September 23, 2012
Richard Vague is board president of the Philadelphia Live Arts Festival and Philly Fringe Nick Stuccio has a bold vision for the future of the Philadelphia Live Arts Festival and Philly Fringe, the cutting-edge contemporary arts festival that just wrapped up its 16th successful year. But in building a year-round contemporary arts center on the burgeoning Delaware River waterfront, the producing director is doing something you might not expect: He's playing it safe. A recent report by the University of Chicago's Cultural Policy Center, "Set in Stone," suggests that too many arts organizations have rushed into expansion projects before establishing funding, a long-term financial plan, or even a well-defined mission.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
If it were you, in your house, with your family, how would the dance end up? What would you say? Would you reach for your crown molding, or sway with your mate in front of the fridge? Would you even let Amy Smith and Andrew Simonet of Headlong Dance Theater anywhere near your front door to create a performance out of your family's life and your living-room mess? And how about the 10 paying audience members who are scooping up tickets to see four Philly families do exactly that?
NEWS
August 2, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
BOB FRANKLIN was a man of diverse accomplishments.   Foremost among them was his enormous talent as a master printer of fine art, which earned him a national reputation. But he was also a drummer with an African flavor, a professional boxer with 13 fights and a star of the playground-basketball scene, where he liked to talk about whipping Bill Cosby when both lived in the Richard Allen Homes. Robert Warren Franklin, who worked with more than 200 well-known artists in 30 years at the Brandywine Workshop on South Broad Street, died July 20 after a brief illness.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | Jon Takiff
THE FIRST DAY of classes at the Philadelphia Performing Arts Charter School last fall had "kind of an Oprah moment," recalled Jason Corosanite. All 250 of the school's sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders were gathered at its Broad and Oregon location. Each was presented with an iPad to use throughout the school year. "You could hear the shrieks for blocks," said Corosanite. Clearly, it's not every student who gets to start (as opposed to end) the school term with the chant "no more books.
NEWS
March 11, 2012
Sunday Sound and vision The Pennsylvania Ballet presents Robert Weiss' Messiah , an interpretation of Handel's masterpiece, with guests the Philadelphia Singers featuring soloists Suzanne Ramo , soprano; Jamie Van Eyck , mezzo-soprano; Steve Sanders , tenor; and Levi Hernandez , bass. The program goes on at the Academy of Music , Broad and Locust Streets, at 2 p.m. Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Friday, and 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $20 to $140. Call 215-893-1999.
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