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Perfume

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NEWS
June 6, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
No one could accuse Liz Taylor of being long-winded. One of the last great Hollywood stars, gleaming in a silver sequined gown, uttered but one sentence each time her latest signature perfume was honored Wednesday night at the 20th annual Fragrance Awards, known as the FiFi's. "Oh, the sweet smell of success is very sweet indeed," said the much- married Taylor in her first appearance on the podium at the New York Hilton. On the second trip, she looked at the award - an abstract column holding a droplet symbolizing perfume - and simply said, "This is neat.
NEWS
December 5, 2005 | By Jennifer Byrne
When a coworker of mine recently alleged to have forgotten the name of the perfume she was wearing, I was instantly suspicious. No woman simply forgets the scent she has chosen. Any woman who professes she did is a liar, pure and simple. And what a scent this was: violet leaves harmonizing beautifully with sandalwood, underscored by an inspired touch of black currant, peach and bergamot. A seductive bottom note of jasmine and vanilla completed the bouquet. I had to have it. Yet she had the audacity to evade me, offering the lame excuse that she had "sprayed from a bottle at random" in a hurry.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013
DEAR ABBY: My problem is my mother-in-law and her abundant use of perfume. The last time she visited, it was so bad we had to open our windows to air out the rooms. (This was in January in Minnesota.) My husband addressed the problem with her when I was pregnant, but now that the baby is here, she's back to her old habits. We are all sensitive to perfumes and get headaches when exposed to it. When she visits, we can't get away from the smell. What's the proper etiquette here? - The Nose Knows DEAR NOSE: I receive complaints about perfumes almost daily.
LIVING
December 2, 1993 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
There is a throng of smiling women surrounding perfume entrepreneur Gale Hayman, the woman who helped to create two great legends - the Giorgio Beverly Hills boutique and Giorgio perfume. During this recent visit to John Wanamaker's Center City store, Hayman is signing autographs and chatting with customers as part of a nationwide launch of her latest perfume, Delicious. Behind her is a life-size poster from the national ads, a woman with tousled red hair who has just bitten into a juicy peach.
NEWS
June 2, 1999 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
What a century this has been for fragrance . . . for perfume, for men's cologne, for the whole idea of . . . well . . . smelling nice. Although manmade fragrance has existed for at least three millennia, never before have so many enjoyed it. Down through all the unwashed and untidy centuries before plumbing, the fortunate few who could afford it used fragrance to mask their own body odor and to shield their noses from noxious smells all...
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
Somewhere in my travels, I ran across an ad pushing perfume for little girls. Such commercialism is offensive. It makes me wonder if there's anything left in the world that some greedy entrepreneur will not spoil. It began when manufacturers discovered they could duplicate or imitate familiar scents in a spray can. They found a technology that would make a used car smell like new and they sold us air deodorizers that made the family room smell like a strawberry patch or a pine forest.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Time was when he had his scent - with a masculine name: Aramis, Brut, English Leather. And she had her fragrance - with a feminine name: Joy, L'Air du Temps, White Shoulders. Not anymore. Now dawns the age of gender-bender scents. She wears Passion and so does he. He splashes on Obsession for Men and she sprays herself with Obsession for Women. Both reach for a bottle labeled Tiffany when they emerge from the shower. These are not unisex scents, but separate fragrances linked by a common name and some key ingredients.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
There's no way to know in advance what aroma will greet you when you starting cooking a frozen meal or the ingredients in a can, box or jar. But there could be. "Americans are so nuts about having their food safety-sealed and vacuum packed, they can't smell it anymore," laments sensory consultant Avery Gilbert of Synesthetics, Inc. in Montclair, N.J. But, he adds, "there's talk that someday there will be aroma samples on supermarket shelves....
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once is not enough for Fred Hayman, the man who knocked the fragrance industry on its well-scented ear with the fabulously successful perfume Giorgio. The master entrepreneur with a flair for promotion turned his Giorgio Beverly Hills boutique - and Rodeo Drive - into a world-renowned enclave of upscale shopping and, along the way, established Giorgio perfume as the Chanel No. 5 of its era. Now he's at it again. Hayman is on the publicity trail, working to duplicate, if not surpass, the heady success of Giorgio with his 18-month-old status scent, 273. His plan is to give 273 the kind of cachet that will make it, at $185 an ounce, a must- have blockbuster perfume.
LIVING
December 13, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, FOR THE INQUIRER
First she seduces you with her eyes, then a subtle, sexy smile. Locked on like a heat-seeking missile, she zooms in for her target. You don't stand a chance. The bouquet is intoxicating. "Hi there! Karl Lagerfeld has a new fragrance out. Would you like to try it?" she purrs. This beautiful, charming woman is offering you a whiff of Lagerfeld's Sun, Moon Stars - in other words, the promise of romance, allure and Brad Pitt swooning at your feet. But who are these well-dressed, great-smelling, come-to-life mannequins who spray, smile and share floor space with other holiday decorations in department stores?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In his recording career, Seattle's Mike Hadreas - stage name Perfume Genius - exhibits an incisive lyrical skill set that touches on the explicit and the interpersonal for an art more British and Oscar Wildelike than it is Pacific Northwestern. During Tuesday's show at Union Transfer, Perfume Genius did the same, only more so, with elegance and gritty emotionalism to rival singers such as Alan Vega of Suicide, Antony, or Marc Almond. These were brutally honest, poignant songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013
DEAR ABBY: My problem is my mother-in-law and her abundant use of perfume. The last time she visited, it was so bad we had to open our windows to air out the rooms. (This was in January in Minnesota.) My husband addressed the problem with her when I was pregnant, but now that the baby is here, she's back to her old habits. We are all sensitive to perfumes and get headaches when exposed to it. When she visits, we can't get away from the smell. What's the proper etiquette here? - The Nose Knows DEAR NOSE: I receive complaints about perfumes almost daily.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
High-end Italian fashion house Dolce&Gabbana announced a new perfume recently - a scent not for babes, but for babies. Yes, infants. Supposedly, per I bambini will be redolent of citrus, honey, and the "innocence of childhood. " You can imagine the hilarity - and the derision - this elicited. "Silly" and "idiotic" were the least of the barbs. The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, a nonprofit advocacy group, declared that the very idea of baby perfume "stinks" because many fragrances contain irritants, allergens, and other substances of concern.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helene Kozak, 91, of Palmyra, a Jew who witnessed the Nazi invasion of her native France, died Wednesday, Dec. 26, of sepsis in Marlton. Born in Paris in 1920, Mrs. Kozak lived in the Pletzl, the Jewish quarter of the Fourth Arrondissement. Her family had moved into a Christian quarter of the city before German forces invaded. Mrs. Kozak's Christian neighbors kept the family's secret during the occupation, as soldiers lived in barracks nearby. When Allied forces liberated the city, a U.S. Army captain looking to buy perfume for his wife sought local help to avoid price-gouging.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011
DEAR ABBY: My parents divorced 20 years ago. The court approved a mutual agreement that Dad would pay monthly alimony until Mom remarried or one of them died. He has never missed a payment. I have recently discovered that Mom secretly married her live-in boyfriend 11 years ago, but has continued receiving the alimony without telling my father. Is she committing a crime for which she could be arrested? And is her husband guilty of any wrongdoing? I am extremely upset over this and want to do something to correct this injustice.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011
Q. Can you tell me about mushroom hunting? I'm interested in trying it but don't know where to begin. A. Although mushrooms pop up year-round, spring is the unofficial start of mushroom season for many hunters. Warmer temperatures and rain create ideal growing conditions for a wide variety of fungi. And while there are few things as satisfying as discovering a patch of gorgeous and delicious mushrooms to harvest and enjoy, a search must be undertaken judiciously. An array of wild mushrooms are edible, but many others are mildly poisonous, causing violent stomach upset; some are deadly.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Kathryn Canavan FOR THE INQUIRER
It's in the air. The main attraction at Longwood Gardens this month is invisible. Inside the monumental Kennett Square conservatory, dozens of visitors are nosing around searching for scents. The first thing you will notice as you enter "Making Scents: The Art and Passion of Fragrance" is a whiff of hyacinth that could stop you in your tracks. After you sniff it, you realize that you are standing in a hyacinth-lined gazebo shaped like a giant perfume bottle. "Making Scents" is a context switch for frequent visitors to Longwood, who are accustomed to a feast for the eyes with four acres of colorful indoor blooms.
LIVING
January 21, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wholesome values are enveloped in rhinestones and BFF clubs, sweet smells and individuality, party dresses and philanthropy. That's the take-home message from a shopping cartful of new toys and products for girls - pocketbooks, perfumes and dolls, among others - that promise to nurture self-esteem and other positive qualities. Many parents welcome the alternatives to highly sexualized merchandise (think Bratz) hawked by teen celebrities who sometimes fail to model the best behavior (think Britney, Lindsay)
NEWS
December 11, 2008 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
T-shirts, yoga pants, sweat suits, baseball caps, pajamas, undies - we know these to be basic college fashion fare. But a niche perfume marketed to Penn State alumni? Inspired by the grand architecture of Old Main, the school's blue and white colors, and the loyalty of the Nittany Lion, Pennsylvania State University, the State College institution, is getting a chance to capitalize on a sweet scent of its own just in time for stocking-stuffing season. Penn State for Women and Penn State for Men, sold for $60 each, are the creations of Masik Collegiate Fragrances, led by chief executive officer Katie Masich, 30. The Harrisburg-based, family-owned company also has a scent for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on the market.
SPORTS
December 1, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Oklahoma quarterback Sam Bradford suffered torn ligaments in his non-throwing hand during the Sooners' win against Oklahoma State and is expected to have surgery after the Big Twelve championship game, Sooners coach Bob Stoops said yesterday. Bradford was hurt early in the game, but played with the injury and threw for 370 yards and four touchdowns. Tennessee will introduce former Oakland Raiders coach Lane Kiffin, 33, as its new football coach today. ESPN.com reported that Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive coordinator Monte Kiffin will be joining his son with the Volunteers.
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