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Peripheral Vision

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NEWS
March 23, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
DRUGS AND PREGNANCY. Smoking marijuana during pregnancy stunts fetal growth, leading to smaller infants with lower birth weights, and cocaine use during pregnancy contributes to a three-fold increase in microcephaly - small head size. "Smaller babies in general have more health and developmental problems, and cocaine and marijuana use during pregnancy are each associated with poor fetal growth," says Barry Zuckerman of Boston University School of Medicine, the lead author of a new study reporting those findings in the New England Journal of Medicine.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Want thrills and chills? Forget the killer roller coaster. Think ahead . . . or rather . . . back to the future, where Universal Studios will take you on the ride of your life. The Orlando, Fla., theme park says it has integrated simulator ride vehicles, three-dimensional images projected on seven-story-high hemispherical screens, multi-channel sound, live effects and sophisticated hydraulics into a multi-sensory attraction that gives riders the illusion of time travel. Passengers will fall back in time, to the prehistoric era, to be swallowed by a dinosaur, then catapult forward to the year 2015.
NEWS
June 21, 2011
I have been a motorcyclist for more than 40 years, and a member and officer with American Bikers Advocating Training and Education (A.B.A.T.E.) of the Garden State, for the last 10 years. An article on June 9, "Pa. helmet bill reintroduced, and motorcyclists rally to fight it," cited research that might lead one to think there are no good reasons not to wear a helmet. But actually, there are. Here are three: Full-face helmets, quite beneficial under 20 to 25 m.p.h., at higher speeds become 200-pound weights that pull the wearer up and over the handlebars, creating a human projectile.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Matthew Rastelli, 85, of Havertown, a musician who helped his wife run West Philadelphia's Marigold Restaurant for 36 years, died of a stroke Sunday at Haverford Nursing & Rehabilitation Center. He had been in a near-coma since he was felled by a stroke Thanksgiving Day. Mr. Rastelli played the saxophone, the clarinet and the flute in bands nearly all his life. He enjoyed all kinds of music and played Greek American songs, pop tunes and jazz, among other kinds of music. "After playing a job, the musicians would go to a club where they would get together and jam," said his wife, Elizabeth C. "Bette" Battaglia Rastelli.
NEWS
August 25, 2002 | By Marcia Schnedler FOR THE INQUIRER
Most senior travelers enjoy the sense of freedom they feel behind the wheel of their car or recreational vehicle on vacation. But despite years of driving experience, our bodies change with aging in ways that increase the chance of having an accident. Our peripheral vision may narrow. Reaction time often increases. Hearing acuity declines. People 65 and older have a higher rate of crash fatalities per miles driven than any other age group except teenagers, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.
SPORTS
September 21, 2000 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine wearing eyeglasses with a large, black dot covering more than half of each lens, and you get a darkened, fuzzy glimpse of what it's like to be Marla Runyan. Runyan, 30, an Olympic runner, has Stargardt's disease, an inherited, incurable condition that results in the slow degeneration of the retina, the light-sensitive membrane in the back of the eye. Because the disease affects only the macula, the area at the center of the retina that's responsible for the fine, detailed central vision used in reading, peripheral vision is usually preserved.
SPORTS
March 29, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
The Seattle Mariners will open their 1997 season in Japan if a plan being negotiated clears some final hurdles, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported yesterday. The longest road trip in baseball history probably would involve games with the Detroit Tigers. It moved closer to reality this week when major league baseball officials OK'd for the first time the idea of scheduling regular-season games abroad. Paul Isaki, Mariners vice president for business development, said the Japan trip is contingent on approval by the players union and final agreement from major league baseball's international division.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | By DIANE WHITE, Special to the Daily News
I had planned to use this space today to reveal that I am Elvis's love child, but now that will have to wait because an even more pressing matter has been thrust suddenly upon me: an unauthorized biography of my spiritual sister, Vanna White. Titled, simply, "Vanna White," this little book by Marianne Robin-Tani promises on its cover to answer the question: "The gorgeous Vanna White: Is she really 'letter-perfect'?" Those of us who know Vanna - and even though I have never met her, I feel that I know her at least as well as I know myself - realize that this is merely a rhetorical question.
NEWS
June 16, 2003 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some children play a mean trumpet. Others can belt a softball out of the park. Cody Hurst, 12, of Horsham, legally blind since birth, is a whiz at braille. In fact, the sixth grader at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham is so quick at reading braille that he qualified in the preliminaries of a student contest sponsored by the Braille Institute in California. By placing in the top 10 in a field of 260, Cody earned a berth in the finals of the National Braille Invitational, to be held June 28 in Los Angeles.
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SPORTS
November 17, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amy McDonaugh is grateful to the organizers of the Philadelphia Marathon for the late invitation to Sunday's event. The 26.2-mile race begins at 7 a.m. and starts at 22d Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. After the New York City Marathon was canceled because of Sandy, the organizers of the Philadelphia Marathon extended an invitation to those runners even though all 14,500 spots in Philly had been sold out since Oct. 1. Philadelphia was prepared to accept another 3,000 of the runners denied the chance in New York, but just 1,454 applied.
NEWS
June 21, 2011
I have been a motorcyclist for more than 40 years, and a member and officer with American Bikers Advocating Training and Education (A.B.A.T.E.) of the Garden State, for the last 10 years. An article on June 9, "Pa. helmet bill reintroduced, and motorcyclists rally to fight it," cited research that might lead one to think there are no good reasons not to wear a helmet. But actually, there are. Here are three: Full-face helmets, quite beneficial under 20 to 25 m.p.h., at higher speeds become 200-pound weights that pull the wearer up and over the handlebars, creating a human projectile.
SPORTS
January 3, 2011
IT WAS IMPORTANT for Kevin Kolb to be the real deal in April, in July and in September. It was important when Donovan McNabb was first traded that the Eagles had a plan in place, had a quarterback for the future, had us all sold that this was Kevin Kolb's time. Now, after the season Michael Vick had and the season Donovan McNabb did not have, that is no longer as important. So can we stop ascribing attributes to him that he may not possess, attributes that have been, at best, hit or miss?
SPORTS
April 23, 2009 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
IMAGINE FOR A moment closing your eyes and running 10 feet. Try squinting to the point where you can barely see, or your vision is blurred and you're running full speed for 100 yards. Not knowing when or where to stop. Not knowing if you're even running straight. Feel uncomfortable, uncertain? Feel like you're drifting to where you're about to fall and have to put your hand out to navigate? Now you have a general sense of how Josiah Jamison and Royal Mitchell must feel each time they go careening down a narrow corridor at world-class speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Pamela Sabaugh - a slim brunette, mid-30s, dressed in black - stands center stage, poised and elegant amid ladders and half-done set construction at the Adrienne Theatre's Playground space, about to launch into her huge monologue at the top of Act 2 in Brian Friel's Molly Sweeney. She delicately points her toe and feels the edge of the raised circular platform. Then she reaches back and feels for the chair behind her. Pamela Sabaugh is vision-impaired - not altogether blind, but close enough to carry a white cane.
SPORTS
May 14, 2005 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Slowly but relentlessly, Jamie Dean's world darkened. By the time he was in fifth grade, the genetic eye disease with which he was born - retinitis pigmentosa - had stolen away some of his peripheral vision, and he was no longer able to read quickly. By 10th grade, he was no longer able to sight-read at all. Yesterday, as Dean relaxed under a canopy at the Dad Vail Regatta alongside the Schuylkill with his teammates from Wake Forest, he described his vision as "kind of like looking through a needle hole in a piece of paper.
SPORTS
August 16, 2004 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The disappointment on Brendan Hansen's face was as raw as the wind had been during last night's men's 100-meter breaststroke final. The Havertown, Delaware County, native had trained and dreamed for a lifetime, only to reach an Olympic wall a foot behind Japan's Kosuke Kitajima. Then, as he tried to get beyond his hurt and focus on Wednesday's 200-meter rematch, a teammate claimed that Hansen had been cheated. Aaron Peirsol said underwater cameras showed that Kitajima had used an illegal dolphin kick at the start - snapping his feet back out of a deep knee bend.
NEWS
June 16, 2003 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some children play a mean trumpet. Others can belt a softball out of the park. Cody Hurst, 12, of Horsham, legally blind since birth, is a whiz at braille. In fact, the sixth grader at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham is so quick at reading braille that he qualified in the preliminaries of a student contest sponsored by the Braille Institute in California. By placing in the top 10 in a field of 260, Cody earned a berth in the finals of the National Braille Invitational, to be held June 28 in Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 25, 2002 | By Marcia Schnedler FOR THE INQUIRER
Most senior travelers enjoy the sense of freedom they feel behind the wheel of their car or recreational vehicle on vacation. But despite years of driving experience, our bodies change with aging in ways that increase the chance of having an accident. Our peripheral vision may narrow. Reaction time often increases. Hearing acuity declines. People 65 and older have a higher rate of crash fatalities per miles driven than any other age group except teenagers, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Roger Weiss was one assignment away from finishing a correspondence course in photography when he started noticing a problem with his eyesight. The problem started small - he had trouble finding his car keys on the flowered tablecloth, and he kept driving into the same pothole on his way to work - but it soon escalated into scary episodes on the road at night. He found out in March 1990 that he had macular degeneration, the same eye disease that had stricken his father. It would not be long before Weiss was legally blind.
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