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Perrier

ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2007 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
Here in Philadelphia we have our own "Breakfast at Tiffany's. " But you don't have to be two drifters off to see the world to enjoy lunch at Boyds. At this outpost of Brasserie Perrier you'll find designer shopping, Audrey Hepburn chic, and food good enough to chase away whatever the color of your bad mood. The best part is that you can write your own script. Or so advises Jesse Sarnoff, the GM who came from D.C. about four months ago and doesn't mind if customers dash in and out or stay the afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2002 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
If Indian summer is keeping you elbow-deep in tomatoes, consider turning those unrequited love apples into delicious, herb-flavored and conveniently storable tomato confit. At Le Mas Perrier on Lancaster Avenue in Wayne, Chef Laurent Pillard makes the confit - a close cousin to the sundried tomato - out of his surplus 'maters. (His recipe is for as large a quantity as you like; just be sure not to saturate the tomato wedges with oil.) Pillard pairs the tangy dried tomatoes with proscuitto and pesto on "ciabatta" bread laced with kalamata olives and olive oil. CIABATTA SANDWICH Ciabatta olive roll 1/2 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil 2-3 pieces tomato confit (see below)
NEWS
April 13, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two sexual-harassment lawsuits against Georges Perrier, the renowned chef and restaurateur, have been dismissed. The suits, which also alleged sexual discrimination, were brought in July by two women who once worked at his Brasserie Perrier restaurant. The dismissal stipulations, filed last week in federal court by lawyers for former Brasserie manager Suzanne Moses and former hostess Sharon Patrick, came by agreement of the parties, according to federal court records. They require each side to pay its own court costs and attorneys' fees.
NEWS
July 11, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Georges Perrier, the Philadelphia chef who led the vanguard of the city's restaurant renaissance three decades ago, was sued yesterday by two women who said they were regularly groped and propositioned by Perrier and other male employees at his Brasserie Perrier restaurant. The sexual-discrimination and -harassment lawsuits, filed in federal court in Philadelphia by Suzanne Moses, a former manager, and Sharon Patrick, a former hostess, describe a "hostile work environment" of unwanted touching, sexual propositions and lewd comments between late 1996 and June 2000 at the restaurant at 1619 Walnut St. The lawsuits also complain of similar conduct toward the women by other top Brasserie Perrier employees: general manager Joseph Amrani, head chef Christopher Scarduzio, and director of operations Andre Guillet.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A protracted water-rights fight that has pitted a small Chester County community against Perrier, the nation's leading purveyor of bottled water, appears to be headed for a settlement. Tonight, supervisors in South Coventry Township are scheduled to discuss a three-party agreement that could end their five-year battle with Perrier Group of America, which bought a 60-acre tract in the township in 1987 from Great Bear Spring Water Co. A local watershed-advocacy group, the Green Valleys Association, is also a party to the settlement.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | By Jill P. Capuzzo FOR THE INQUIRER
Forget about the quest to regain that elusive fifth Mobil star. Don't worry about concocting the perfect sauce bordelaise or the smoothest creme brulee. Philadelphia's premier chef, Georges Perrier, is on a different mission these days: championing the rights of the handicapped. Four weeks after falling down a flight of stairs at a friend's home and breaking both his heels, the restaurateur revered by many and feared by some finds himself in a new position - seated, in a wheelchair.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Georges Perrier, who put Philadelphia on the world culinary map while becoming one of the country's best-known French chefs, is stepping down as executive chef of Le Bec-Fin, his flagship restaurant. He will assume the title of chef-owner. He says he's lost his mojo. "I'm tired. I'm old. I have two other restaurants to run," said Perrier, 57, introducing his successor, Frederic Cote, 33, to a dining room full of staff Friday afternoon. Cote previously was second in command at Daniel in New York, one of the top-rated French restaurants in the United States.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | by Sono Motoyama, Daily News Staff Writer
Mon Dieu! Folks are starved for French food in the suburbs. Or so you might think. On a recent Friday evening, the parking lot at Spread Eagle Village, home of Georges Perrier's latest restaurant, was packed with cars. This time out, the diminutive dynamo behind Le Bec-Fin and Brasserie Perrier is trying to evoke the feeling of a French country estate, which the eatery's name, Le Mas Perrier, suggests. Perrier imported 29-year-old chef Pascal Valero, who brings to Le Mas Perrier Provencal dishes with his own twist.
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