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NEWS
July 25, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Shiraz Restaurant takes its name from an Iranian city known as a poet's paradise. So many inspiring elements can be found in the two-story restaurant that stands like a shrine, it's difficult to know where the rapture begins. Is it the opulence of the building, a massive fortresslike structure on Lancaster Avenue? Or the exoticness of the Persian-style food? In terms of stagecraft, you can't do any better than Shiraz, a mosque-size restaurant that still manages to be down-to-earth.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Paul R. Sprachman spent much of his academic career teaching a language most Americans did not care much about before Sept. 11. Now his proficiency in Persian is in much demand by students. The language is widely used in Afghanistan, and Sprachman - who lived for two years as a Peace Corps volunteer there and is the only professor at Rutgers University who teaches Persian - has been thrust from obscurity to center stage. Sprachman has a proclivity for Central Asian languages - he speaks and writes seven, including Pashto, which most members of the Taliban speak.
NEWS
December 16, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Whenever I eat Persian food, I always keep an eye out for the tadik. Tadik is the dangerously addictive cracker of toasted basmati that forms a golden crust at the bottom of a proper pot of Persian rice. And a plate of it, poised one recent Saturday night atop the open kitchen's counter at Shundeez in Chestnut Hill, was going really fast. Oh yes, I ate my share, snapping a sheet of deeply browned rice against the softness of a juicy chicken kabob, sweeping it into the tangy darkness of a pureed pomegranate and walnut sauce called fesenjon.
NEWS
August 17, 2001
POOR, UNFORTUNATE Kianna Williams, living in a suburban home "with Persian rugs and white-leather furniture" with a million-dollar-making basketball-star common-law husband, driving her Christmas-present SUV, eating a gourmet dinner prepared by a chef who came to the home they shared! She milked the system for almost a year and now says she isn't going after Aaron McKie's money. Tracey Spaventa, Norristown Aaron McKie is being used to sell newspapers. Were you on the Sixers bandwagon when they were winning in style?
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time," palace treachery has warring princes trying to figure out who killed their father and king. Suspects include buff and boyish hero Jake Gyllenhaal, some British actors you've never heard of, and Ben Kingsley, sporting a goatee and black eyeliner. You really shouldn't need more than one guess. Even without the Maybelline, you know it's Sir Baldie, who since Gandhi has been playing one bastard after another, and with such brio it's almost impossible to imagine he once embodied the principle of nonviolence.
NEWS
September 1, 2007
I LOST A VERY special neighbor recently. After fighting cancer for nine years, she lost her life in a car accident. Sam was one of the first to welcome us when my husband and I moved in three years ago. When I heard about the accident, I immediately thought about her cat. We had two dogs and four cats, but we decided that if no one in her family could care for the cat, we would. It turned out that Sam had two cats. When I walked over, I saw a beautiful black Persian. I could hear the other growling under a chair and decided to take the Persian and give the other time to settle down.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Buying rugs at auction is often risky business, particularly at traveling auctions of Oriental carpets or going-out-of-business sales. With limited inspection time, inexperienced buyers can end up paying prices equal to or greater than retail. Starting today, however, Jerry M. Sorkin, a respected, well-established dealer in Wayne, will be offering almost 1,000 rugs at a three-day auction - to settle debts resulting from the closing of his Cherry Hill location. That may sound like the kind of double-talk often associated with traveling-rug-auction advertisements.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time," palace treachery has warring princes trying to figure out who killed their father and king. Suspects include buff and boyish hero Jake Gyllenhaal, some British actors you've never heard of, and Ben Kingsley, sporting a goatee and black eyeliner. You really shouldn't need more than one guess. Even without the Maybelline, you know it's Sir Baldie, who since Gandhi has been playing one bastard after another, and with such brio it's almost impossible to imagine he once embodied the principle of nonviolence.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
"If someone, whether he can read or not, sees good writing, he likes to enjoy the sight of it. " - Qadi Ahmad, 16th-century Persian writer. You can see examples of excellent writing at the University of Pennsylvania Museum's Sharpe Gallery, beginning tomorrow, although you may not be able to read them. Among the 60 examples in "Monumental Islamic Calligraphy from India" are large-scale rubbings of carved inscriptions. And while they are rendered in Persian and Arabic, their aesthetic beauty is evident even to those unfamiliar with Middle Eastern languages, according to Penn's Renata Holod, an art history professor who is the curator of the museum showing.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having scratched her way to the top, Madame lives in a guest room, secure in a generously proportioned cage with a view of the front yard and nearby birds, where hot stoves or the stray claws of house cats cannot mar her formidable feline form. She is a "frequent flier," secreted onto planes in a black and brown floral carrier that her owner, Ann V. Sones of Upper Southampton, slips under her seat. Madame prefers hotels to home. On the road, dinner of choice is top-of-the-round steak or baby food, served off the spoon.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Top executives of state-owned Persian Gulf airlines went on the offensive Tuesday against allegations, leveled by three U.S. airlines, of unfair business practices and billions in subsidies that breach "Open Skies" agreements. Jim Hogan, CEO of Etihad Airways, and Tim Clark, president of Emirates Airline, were in Washington to meet with transportation and administration officials and rebut claims made against them by American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, and United Airlines that they have benefited from $42 billion in foreign government subsidies over the last decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
  The 4700 Wissahickon Ave. complex, once the home of the old Atwater Kent Manufacturing Co., producer of radios, will attract bidders, not broadcasters, next week with sales at two of its tenants. One will even offer a smattering of vintage radio equipment. The first sale will begin at 11 a.m. Sunday at 4700's Suite 101, where Material Culture, the fledgling auction house specializing in ethnic objects from around the world, will offer more than 475 lots of early and contemporary art and antiques from developing nations.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Robert Moran and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Calvin Zaun, 83, of Cherry Hill, the father of an American POW whose battered face became an iconic image during the Persian Gulf War, died Sunday, May 27, at the Lutheran Home nursing-care facility in Moorestown after a long illness. Mr. Zaun's son, Jeffrey, was held captive for six weeks by Saddam Hussein's forces in 1991. Calvin and Marjorie Zaun found their quiet lives on Whitman Avenue in Cherry Hill plunged into a media maelstrom after their son's captors paraded Jeffrey Zaun and other prisoners of war on Iraqi TV and forced them to read propaganda statements on Jan. 20. On March 5, a story on the front page of the Washington Post began: "Before dawn, Calvin Zaun began rejoicing, running down the street, banging on neighbors' doors and shouting ‘He's free!
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Adam Schreck, Associated Press
MANAMA, Bahrain - The top U.S. Navy official in the Persian Gulf region said Sunday that he took Iran's military capabilities seriously, but he insisted his forces were prepared to confront any Iranian aggression in the region. Vice Adm. Mark Fox, commander of the Fifth Fleet, told reporters at the naval force's Bahrain headquarters that the Navy had "built a wide range of potential options to give the president" and was "ready today" to confront any hostile action by Iran. He did not say specifically how the Navy might respond to an Iranian strike or an effort to shut the entrance to the Persian Gulf, though any response would likely involve the two U.S. aircraft carriers and other warships cruising the waters off Iran.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Jonathan S. Landay and Kevin G. Hall, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The possibility of a confrontation between the United States and Iran appeared to grow Tuesday after the Obama administration dismissed an Iranian warning against moving a U.S. aircraft carrier into the Persian Gulf, saying the deployment was crucial to "the security and stability of the region. " Fears that a crisis could disrupt gulf tanker traffic carrying 40 percent of the world's seaborne oil drove international petroleum prices up by more than $4 a barrel, a potential threat to U.S. and global economies.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Benjamin Haas, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - As a child growing up in Kaifeng in central China, Jin Jin was constantly reminded of her unusual heritage. "We weren't supposed to eat pork, our graves were different from other people, and we had a mezuza on our door," said Jin, 25, referring to the prayer scroll affixed to doorways of Jewish homes. Her father told her of a faraway land called Israel that he said was her rightful home, she recalled, but "we didn't know anything about daily prayers or the weekly reading of the Torah.
NEWS
October 15, 2011
Jagjit Singh, 70, a singer of wide popularity in South Asia who helped revive and popularize ghazals - a venerable form of Persian poetry set to music expressing the writer's feelings, especially about love - died Monday in Mumbai. The cause was a brain hemorrhage. Until Mr. Singh embraced the form, ghazal singing was followed largely by the elite. He helped bring it to a wider audience, including young people steeped in rock and hip-hop. With a hauntingly velvet voice expressing the brooding sadness and the lyricism of his songs, he performed to packed audiences in India, Pakistan and elsewhere in South Asia and released dozens of albums during his 40-year career.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time," palace treachery has warring princes trying to figure out who killed their father and king. Suspects include buff and boyish hero Jake Gyllenhaal, some British actors you've never heard of, and Ben Kingsley, sporting a goatee and black eyeliner. You really shouldn't need more than one guess. Even without the Maybelline, you know it's Sir Baldie, who since Gandhi has been playing one bastard after another, and with such brio it's almost impossible to imagine he once embodied the principle of nonviolence.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In "Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time," palace treachery has warring princes trying to figure out who killed their father and king. Suspects include buff and boyish hero Jake Gyllenhaal, some British actors you've never heard of, and Ben Kingsley, sporting a goatee and black eyeliner. You really shouldn't need more than one guess. Even without the Maybelline, you know it's Sir Baldie, who since Gandhi has been playing one bastard after another, and with such brio it's almost impossible to imagine he once embodied the principle of nonviolence.
NEWS
September 30, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, as they say, you had to be there. The ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus was there. He witnessed a piece of the Persian wars against Greece - in fact, he was a soldier - and he spun one pivotal battle into what historians label the world's oldest surviving play. The Persians, being staged by People's Light & Theatre Company in a stiff modern version that reflects the way Aeschylus wrote it, opened in Athens 2,480 years ago. It was part of a trilogy staged at the festival dedicated to the god of theater, Dionysius, where it won first prize.
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