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Personal Computer

BUSINESS
September 14, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
Completions of new homes rose a scant 0.3 percent in July to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.51 million units, the Commerce Department said yesterday. The increase in June had been 3.6 percent. The July rate was 10.4 percent below the July 1987 pace of 1.68 million units, the department said. Completions of single-family homes fell 3.1 percent in July to a 1.06- million-unit annual rate after rising 0.6 percent in June, while completions of multiple-unit buildings rose 9.4 percent to a 444,000-unit rate after a 12.4 percent June rise.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By Janet Mason, Special to The Inquirer
Wherever it's going to be a computer Christmas, program purchases also should be carefully planned - because even the most dazzling personal computer won't do much without software. People who receive a personal computer (or buy one for themselves) this holiday season will find software that will make their past struggles with typewriters and filing cabinets seem like a hazy era from the Dark Ages. Many of the following software packages are readily available at department stores, such major computer stores as the Software Galleria (in Center City's Gallery)
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By Robert McSherry, Special to The Inquirer
A Montgomery County lawyer, a burglary victim last month, was facing criminal charges himself yesterday thanks to a tip to police from the burglars. Lower Merion Township police said the lawyer, Brian P. Cleere, 49, and his wife, Carol Cleere, 47, were charged with falsely reporting a burglary at their Penn Valley home to collect homeowners' insurance for a personal computer stolen from the lawyer's uninsured office in Wynnewood. Police said the report of a June 16 burglary at the couple's home in the 1300 block of North Woodbine Avenue became suspect two weeks ago when two Philadelphia men confessed to stealing a $4,000 personal computer from Cleere's office in the Wynnewood Shopping Center.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unisys Corp. yesterday said that it would introduce a top-of-the-line personal computer based on emerging industry standards for hardware and software. The features of the new machine, which is expected to reach the market in the fourth quarter, are similar to those of IBM's new generation of PCs, unveiled in April. The new Unisys machine will use the powerful 80386 microprocessor made by Intel Corp. and Operating System/2 (OS/2) software supplied by Microsoft Corp. IBM chose the same microprocessor and software for the top models in its new line of PCs, the Personal System/2 series.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
A few years ago, upstart little personal-computer makers were biting the dust as regularly as outlaws at the hands of Wyatt Earp. The territory just wasn't big enough to hold everyone who tried to stake a claim to it, and the strong picked off the weak right and left. In the turbulent years of 1983 and 1984, RIPs went up for Osborne, Columbia, Gavilan, Eagle, Chesapeake, Seequa and Otrona, among others. Even some better- muscled companies, like Texas Instruments and Atari, couldn't hold their ground and were run out of the business.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drexel University's mandate that every student have a Macintosh computer is paying off in an unexpected form - cash - for 22 students and faculty members, and for the university. The 22 have earned $10,000 in royalties on educational software that they developed for use at Drexel and that is now being sold nationwide by Kinko's Copies, a national chain of photocopying stores. The money will be split between the university and the individuals, with $6,000 going to Drexel and $4,000 to be shared by the 22 software developers.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
The makers of the Laser 128 personal computer have agreed to a court order that prevents them from using operating-system software that Franklin Computer Corp. contends was copied from software to which it owns the copyright, the companies said yesterday. However, the makers of the Laser 128 have developed new software that Franklin agrees does not violate its copyright, so distribution of the Laser 128 is continuing without interruption under the terms of the order. The temporary order was signed yesterday by U.S. District Judge John F. Gerry in Camden.
LIVING
March 1, 1987 | By Dan Gutman, Special to The Inquirer
Religious computer software is a big business, with dozens of companies supplying all kinds of programs. Here in the Age of Information, it makes sense that the Bible would be available on-line. By hooking your computer up over a phone line with Dialog Informations Service (Information: 800-3-DIALOG), you can read the King James Version. That's 33,600 records, including every word of the Old and New Testaments. Few people probably will want to read the Scriptures off a screen, but more likely may use the computer to research the Bible.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are those who have loved Apple's Macintosh personal computer from the moment they first laid eyes on it in 1984. In the main, they have not been executives of the nation's largest corporations. While engineers, computer nuts, academics and owners of small businesses were being seduced by features that made the Mac easier to use than any other personal computer, the gray-flannel-suit crowd stuck with a gray-flannel name: IBM. In the past year, however, that resistance has begun to crack.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1986 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beginning in March, IA/Buckley Corp. had just eight months to rebuild a six-mile stretch of the Schuylkill Expressway between Manayunk and Conshohocken. The project involved about 1,800 discrete tasks, including tearing up sections of roadway, building forms for bridge decks and laying concrete. On any day, more than two dozen crews, employed both by IA/Buckley and by its 18 subcontractors, would be at work on jobs up and down the section. To finish on time, all those tasks and all those contractors would have to dovetail perfectly.
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