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Pertussis

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January 10, 1994 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pertussis, or whooping cough, should no longer be treated simply as a childhood disease, a growing number of medical researchers believe. Within the last year, they've begun focusing on the role adults play in spreading the disease, which generally doesn't make adults very sick but can be deadly to infants. In March, the federal government plans to begin trials of an adult vaccine in an effort to better control the disease. "This is almost a quantum shift in thinking about the epidemiology of whooping cough," said Dr. George Curlin, deputy director of the division of microbiology and infectious diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new audit of Philadelphia's public health clinics shows that immunization rates for toddlers are so low that they make the city vulnerable to outbreaks of measles, pertussis and polio, the doctor who conducted the study says. "Given the low inner-city rates, I'm concerned that we're going to have an epidemic," said Barbara Watson, an infectious-disease specialist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, who conducted the audit. Children's Hospital recently treated its first case of measles this year - an 11-year-old boy - and has continued to see higher-than-normal numbers of children with pertussis, or whooping cough.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | Staff Report
Two cases of pertussis have been reported at Hillsdale Elementary School in West Chester, prompting officials to bar any students or staff who have not been vaccinated against the disease from entering the building. The West Chester Area School District says the Chester County Health Department confirmed the second case on Tuesday, qualifying it as an "outbreak" at the site. Superintendent Jim Scanlon said the district had received "sporadic" reports of pertussis, popularly known as whooping cough, at its schools during January and letters were sent home to parents.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
A big whoop for whooping cough? A new vaccine for whooping cough has been pronounced "much safer" than the original medication, which caused sometimes serious side effects in as many as half of all vaccinated babies. The results of a large-scale study to be presented in Philadelphia tomorrow at the meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America will show that the new vaccine for whooping cough, or pertussis, showed a "substantial reduction in serious side effects," according to Dr. David W. Scheifele, director of the Vaccine Evaluation Center, Children's Hospital, British Columbia.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rise in reported cases of whooping cough in the Philadelphia suburbs in the last several months prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Health on Monday to urge that people throughout the state ensure that their vaccinations are up to date. It also scheduled free vaccine clinics in Delaware and York Counties. The significance of the increases - in Bucks, Chester, Montgomery, and in particular, Delaware Counties - is not clear. Although the short-term trend is up, health officials in some of the counties said the numbers this year were not much different from the same period last year.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | By Dr. George W. Bradford
Pertussis or "whooping cough" is a highly contagious and sometimes fatal disease that was once much feared, but is now extremely rare. Unfortunately, the vaccine that made it rare is starting to become much feared. There have been reports in the press of brain injuries that were permanent or even fatal. There have been reports that Lederle and Connaught laboratories, facing 150 vaccine-related suits between them in 1985 alone, have drastically increased the price of the vaccine.
NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
With pertussis at its highest level nationally in a half-century, the Philadelphia region has been weathering a spike that in some places is more than triple the previous record set two years ago. "We're sort of way off the scale this year," said Stephen Ostroff, Pennsylvania's acting physician general. "It really started picking up in the summer, and once kids got back to school, the [pertussis] was already there. " Cases of pertussis, also known as whooping cough, often decline in late fall into early winter.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades after medical science had all but eliminated whooping cough, Philadelphia and other large cities across the country are reporting serious outbreaks of the sometimes-deadly disease because of the failure to immunize children, city and federal officials said. In the first 2 1/2 months of the year, the city Health Department has recorded 27 cases, a number exceeding most yearly totals over the last 10 years. Many more cases - mainly in infants under 12 months - are expected in the coming months, according to local medical professionals.
NEWS
August 7, 2012
Have you gotten your Tdap shot? If you don't know what that is, you aren't unusual, which helps explain why whooping cough, or pertussis, is making an alarming comeback. Nearly 18,000 cases, including nine deaths, have been reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention so far this year, a pace not seen since 1959. Tdap is a booster vaccine against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Since 2005, when it was licensed, the CDC has recommended the shot for adolescents and adults, including pregnant women, because protection from childhood vaccination wanes.
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NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
With pertussis at its highest level nationally in a half-century, the Philadelphia region has been weathering a spike that in some places is more than triple the previous record set two years ago. "We're sort of way off the scale this year," said Stephen Ostroff, Pennsylvania's acting physician general. "It really started picking up in the summer, and once kids got back to school, the [pertussis] was already there. " Cases of pertussis, also known as whooping cough, often decline in late fall into early winter.
NEWS
August 7, 2012
Have you gotten your Tdap shot? If you don't know what that is, you aren't unusual, which helps explain why whooping cough, or pertussis, is making an alarming comeback. Nearly 18,000 cases, including nine deaths, have been reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention so far this year, a pace not seen since 1959. Tdap is a booster vaccine against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Since 2005, when it was licensed, the CDC has recommended the shot for adolescents and adults, including pregnant women, because protection from childhood vaccination wanes.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Bonnie Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A ninth-grader at Pennfield Middle School in the North Penn School District in Montgomery County has been diagnosed with whooping cough, an official said this afternoon. The student came to school Monday morning, mentioned he had had whooping cough last week, and was immediately sent home, said Christine Liberaski, the North Penn School District's manager of school and community engagement. In a letter to parents posted today on the school district's website, district officials warned, "Your child may have been exposed.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
Two cases of pertussis, popularly known as whooping cough, have been reported at Hillsdale Elementary School in West Chester, prompting officials to bar any students or staff who have not been vaccinated against the disease from entering the building. The West Chester Area School District says the Chester County Health Department confirmed the second case Tuesday, qualifying it as an "outbreak" at the site. Superintendent Jim Scanlon said in a statement on the district's website that officials "have identified the Hillsdale students who were not vaccinated and will be working with the Department of Health to provide those vaccinations" that will allow them to return to school.
NEWS
August 24, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A rise in reported cases of whooping cough in the Philadelphia suburbs in the last several months prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Health on Monday to urge that people throughout the state ensure that their vaccinations are up to date. It also scheduled free vaccine clinics in Delaware and York Counties. The significance of the increases - in Bucks, Chester, Montgomery, and in particular, Delaware Counties - is not clear. Although the short-term trend is up, health officials in some of the counties said the numbers this year were not much different from the same period last year.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Luz "Luchie" Coady Baldwin, 76, of Gladwyne, former director of the pediatrics department at Bryn Mawr Hospital, died of ovarian cancer Wednesday, April 14, at the hospital. Dr. Coady, as she was known professionally, maintained a pediatric practice in Bryn Mawr and was on the hospital's staff for more than 30 years. She directed the pediatrics department from 1984 to 1991, becoming the first woman to lead a major medical department at the hospital. "If someone else was doing it, I'd probably complain and moan," she told an Inquirer reporter in 1985, "so I figured I might as well do it myself.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
Whooping cough, a disease Americans figured they had whipped with the modern medical miracle of childhood vaccinations, is soaring again throughout the nation in numbers not seen in decades. When pediatric infectious-disease specialist Dennis Cunningham of Children's Hospital here tells parents that their child has whooping cough, something he has been doing a lot lately, they often ask him: "They still have that around?" Down to barely 1,000 cases in 1976, pertussis - the scientific name for whooping cough - steadily rose in 1980s and 1990s in America.
NEWS
December 15, 2003 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey Collick never "whooped. " But the 17-year-old North Philadelphia youth did vomit, almost continuously, for three weeks last March. He dropped 10 pounds and stopped attending classes at George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science. Playing basketball became impossible. Doctors prescribed antibiotics, but nothing seemed to work. Collick grew weaker and dehydrated. Finally, his mother, Pearl Fletcher, took Collick to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where the 6-foot-1 athlete was diagnosed with whooping cough, a disease normally associated with infants and toddlers.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
A big whoop for whooping cough? A new vaccine for whooping cough has been pronounced "much safer" than the original medication, which caused sometimes serious side effects in as many as half of all vaccinated babies. The results of a large-scale study to be presented in Philadelphia tomorrow at the meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America will show that the new vaccine for whooping cough, or pertussis, showed a "substantial reduction in serious side effects," according to Dr. David W. Scheifele, director of the Vaccine Evaluation Center, Children's Hospital, British Columbia.
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