CollectionsPeru
IN THE NEWS

Peru

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 20, 2011 | By Frank Bajak, Associated Press
LIMA, Peru - Three days after barring her exit, Peruvian migration officials gave U.S. parolee Lori Berenson a document Monday clearing her to leave the country with her toddler son to spend the holidays with her family in New York City. Berenson, 42, was convicted in 2001 of acting as an accomplice to terrorism while aiding the leftist Tupac Amaru rebel group. Despite a court's approval, authorities prevented her from boarding a flight to New York on Friday, saying she needed an additional document.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1990 | By Robin Kirk, Special to The Inquirer
Morning in Lima begins with the 7 a.m. financial report on Peru's 24-hour news-radio station. It's the first to announce the opening value of the U.S. dollar on Ocona Street. Ocona is the informal heart of Peru's economy. Here, on a kind of outdoor Wall Street, dollars are bought. But this block in downtown Lima also is where the forces that plague Peru - hyperinflation, drugs and violence - are reflected in raw dollar values. As a country, Peru is dangerously close to bankruptcy.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Frank Bajak, Associated Press
LIMA, Peru - Paroled U.S. activist Lori Berenson said Saturday that she and her toddler son were not allowed to leave Peru despite being granted permission in court to spend the holidays in New York with her family. "They didn't let me leave, and they're putting out this version that I arrived late," she said in a brief phone conversation, referring to media reports citing unnamed airport officials. Her attorney, Anibal Apari, accused the government of making an arbitrary political decision to halt her departure.
NEWS
August 3, 1986 | By H. G. Bissinger, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 31-year-old Enrique Prugue, the evening had all the ingredients of a quiet night at home. His mother and father, with whom he lives, had left to visit one of their other children. So Prugue finished dinner, left the cook in the kitchen to put away the dishes and settled into his bedroom to watch television. He remembers vividly what happened then. "All of a sudden, seven guys came in. The first guy had a shotgun. The next two guys had machine guns. And the rest had pistols.
NEWS
November 4, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A delegation from Philadelphia this week is in Peru, where Philadelphia is expected to be voted the first U.S. municipality to gain the designation of World Heritage City. The title is held by about 260 cities worldwide. It could enhance the city's status on the world stage and boost it as an international tourism site and business hub. "We are looking forward, with a mixture of excitement and confidence, to a positive outcome in the city's remarkable case to become a World Heritage City," John F. Smith III, chair of the Global Philadelphia Association, said in a statement.
SPORTS
June 5, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
Brian Bliss, Tab Ramos and Bruce Murray scored in the first half yesterday as the United States shocked Peru, 3-0, to win the Marlboro Cup of New York. It was the first time in 56 years that a U.S. soccer team scored three goals against a team from South America and it was the first victory over a South American opponent in 11 games since the U.S. team beat Colombia, 1-0, on Oct. 11, 1984. The United States, which resumes World Cup qualifying against Guatemala on June 17, is only 3-9-6 against South American teams in 104 years of international competition.
NEWS
August 30, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After more than 40 years of local service, the Serra Club of Central Delaware County is extending its mission overseas. The Catholic nonprofit organization devoted to fostering religious vocations will pay the tuition of a seminarian in the Diocese of Abancay, Peru, this school year. Peter A. Tyrrell Jr., club president, said the donation would go to a needy student at Our Lady of Cocharcas Seminary. "Rev. Michael J. Donofiio, a priest from Peru, attended one of our luncheons.
NEWS
March 22, 1993 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Graf has been home nine weeks now. The cardinal blessed her baby. The bank gave her back her old job. She baked green cupcakes and taped shamrocks to her windows for St. Patrick's Day. She is home, safe. But even as she settles into the life she always longed for, singing lullabies in the serenity of her Fox Chase home, Mary Graf is afraid to believe it. "I feel like I'm still dreaming that I'm here," she said, tears welling in her eyes. "I keep thinking I'll wake up and I'm back in Peru.
NEWS
July 28, 1998 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Soulen, a rancher, as were his father and grandfather before him, remembers the days when his sheepherders spoke of their charges as ardi. The word is Basque, as were the herders, who had come from northern Spain to escape poverty and political turmoil in their homeland. They brought their skills, as well as their ancient, mysterious culture - Europe's oldest - and their language, unrelated to Spanish or any other known Indo-European language. These solitary men roamed Idaho's high country in tiny, picturesque sheep wagons for much of this century, and their exotic ways became so integral to the state's image that a museum in Boise celebrates their culture.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Porus P. Cooper, Staff Writer
Every year about this time, Miriam Smith scours the Internet for one name. She's looking for "anything new" about Louis Giambi, and is relieved when she finds that he's where he's supposed to be - locked up in New Jersey State Prison. Giambi was convicted of murdering her parents and little sister more than three decades ago in a notorious mistaken-identity hit. For a year after the April 17, 1982, killings of William and Catherine Stuart and their 2-year-old daughter, Sandra, in their Pine Hill home, the crime went unsolved, leaving the Camden County suburb on edge.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Latino Film Festival (PHLAFF) returns this weekend for its fifth year with a selection of 21 films (with a focus on shorts and documentaries), a panel discussion, and a youth workshop. Selections this year include films from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Peru, and, of course, the United States. Festival director Marangeli Mejia-Rabell said she hoped that PHLAFF not only raised the profile of minority filmmakers, but also inspired community activism.
SPORTS
May 22, 2016
School will be over soon, so many local athletes are finalizing their summer plans. Some will take on jobs at the shore or around the neighborhood. Others will continue to compete in their sports at camps or other events. And some will travel the world to see the sights and help others in need. Here is a look at how some of the region's top athletes plan to spend their summer: Hailey Andress, Agnes Irwin junior lacrosse goalie   The 17-year-old Wallingford resident spent 16 days in Peru last summer as part of the Agnes Irwin Special Studies Program.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Porus P. Cooper, Staff Writer
Every year about this time, Miriam Smith scours the Internet for one name. She's looking for "anything new" about Louis Giambi, and is relieved when she finds that he's where he's supposed to be - locked up in New Jersey State Prison. Giambi was convicted of murdering her parents and little sister more than three decades ago in a notorious mistaken-identity hit. For a year after the April 17, 1982, killings of William and Catherine Stuart and their 2-year-old daughter, Sandra, in their Pine Hill home, the crime went unsolved, leaving the Camden County suburb on edge.
TRAVEL
April 4, 2016 | By Diana Bauza, For The Inquirer
After six months in Lima, the oddities of the Peruvian capital no longer fazed me: the cacophony of the car horns and alarms, the colorful micros teetering maddeningly along the congested streets, the persistence of the gray skies and misty mornings. I invited my parents to visit because I wanted them to experience firsthand the Lima I had come to love and hoped they would approve of my decision to live there. They came in late March, at the end of summer, when Lima is bathed in generous hours of sunshine.
TRAVEL
February 21, 2016
Answer: South America. Located in the Andes, the Altiplano is a high-plateau area in parts of Bolivia, Peru, Chile, and Argentina. The world's highest navigable lake, Titicaca, is located there.
NEWS
November 4, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A delegation from Philadelphia this week is in Peru, where Philadelphia is expected to be voted the first U.S. municipality to gain the designation of World Heritage City. The title is held by about 260 cities worldwide. It could enhance the city's status on the world stage and boost it as an international tourism site and business hub. "We are looking forward, with a mixture of excitement and confidence, to a positive outcome in the city's remarkable case to become a World Heritage City," John F. Smith III, chair of the Global Philadelphia Association, said in a statement.
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
CHRIS JOYNES JR. always had a taste for travel, but until recently, the farthest the 17-year-old high school student had gone was a childhood trip to Niagara Falls. That changed when he started Summer Search, a national nonprofit program that partners promising low-income high school students with mentors who help shepherd them through high school and college. It also offers them opportunities for transformative travel during their sophomore and junior years. First trip for Joynes, an incoming senior at Boys' Latin Charter School of Philadelphia, was a monthlong backpack trip into Wyoming's rugged Wind River Range last July.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Elizabet took a taxi to Reynosa, Mexico, then walked across the border with $200 in her pocket and a handful of English words in her vocabulary. In Cuba, she'd been a teacher, a daughter, a sister. Here, she dreamed of freedom - for herself and for the child she hoped, someday, to have. That first year in the United States, at 26, she lived with relatives of her brother-in-law; she acquired a Social Security card and cleaned the machines in an egg-processing plant at night. She cried a lot. And she persisted, getting her teaching certification and other paperwork from Cuba, eventually landing a job as a bilingual teacher in a Camden public school.
TRAVEL
December 9, 2013 | By Duane Deaner, For The Inquirer
In August 2012, my companion, Ann, and I took a hiking trip with five other couples to the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu. Each evening, we would bunk down in a modern, rustic eco-lodge. The nine-day trip involved hiking about 52 miles in six days through Peru. We are both in our mid-60s and fairly physically fit and active. However, there were many challenges on this trip: hiking 8 to 10 miles each day; adjusting to a high altitude of 15,000-plus feet; multiple changes in climate; eating local, unfamiliar foods; and avoiding injury.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
Putin: Military proves its skills MOSCOW - President Vladimir Putin said Wednesday that Russia could be proud of its military, which has shown a "high degree" of combat readiness during the nation's biggest war games in more than two decades. The maneuvers, which began Friday and continue through this week, involve 160,000 troops and about 5,000 tanks and other armored vehicles across Siberia and the far eastern region in a massive show of the nation's resurgent military might. The exercise also involved 70 Pacific Fleet ships and 130 aircraft, including Tu-95 strategic bombers.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|