CollectionsPest Control
IN THE NEWS

Pest Control

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
There are "natural" approaches to flea control that can be quite effective if used routinely once a pet is free from parasites. In his excellent book, Dr. Pitcairn's Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats ($10.96, Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pa. 18049), Richard Pitcairn, a holistic veterinarian, recommends first that the animal be bathed frequently with a natural pet shampoo that contains flea- and insect-repellent herbs, such as rosemary, rue, wormwood, pennyroyal, eucalyptus and citronella.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Sydney performed flawlessly. She honed in on her target, sniffing with trained sensitivity for just one substance. Not cocaine. Not guns. Termites. Sydney, an 18-month-old beagle, is one of about a dozen dogs on the East Coast trained to detect termites even before the insects make visible mud tunnels, according to her owner, Thomas M. Reardon, who owns Reardon Associates, Ltd., a Wilmington pest control company. The dog, trained by an Annapolis, Md., dealer to detect wood-destroying insects such as termites and carpenter ants, can pick up the distinctive odor behind walls or under floors.
SPORTS
March 4, 2013
Q: Do you have any advice on what I can do to get my aunt off my back? Before she even says hello, all she ever asks me is if I have a boyfriend. I am getting tired of it!! - Fed Up in Feltonville A: I'm sure she means well, but I understand how the constant questioning can get on your nerves. Maybe you should try answering with humor, like "I have one but he's still living on Mars. " Or, "I'm waiting for the right guy but he just hasn't been born yet. " Or you can stop auntie cold by paraphrasing that great line from "Goodfellas": "I got a boyfriend.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | By Andrew Backover, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Margaret Hsiang was bugged by the roach she found in her school locker a few years ago. Hsiang, who will be a senior at Eastern Camden County Regional High School, was partly to blame since the six-legged visitor was after Doritos crumbs left there. "Pretty gross," said Hsiang, 16, of Voorhees. "I didn't go there for a day or two. " Since then, Hsiang has done much to eliminate roaches and other intruders, as well as promote safer pest-control strategies, at the Voorhees school.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Skunks have taken over several eastern Montgomery County towns. That's not a political statement. It's a smelly reality in these parts. Families of the black-and-white creatures have been spotted walking along roads in Jenkintown, Abington, Cheltenham and Springfield. Their signature, pungent odor permeates the air. And as the locals discover dens beneath their porches and decks and burrowed in the shrubbery, they are struggling with how to deal with this population. Most local animal-control officers are referring specific complaints to private pest-control firms that will trap and dispose of the skunks for a small fee - usually between $50 and $100.
NEWS
May 30, 2004 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deborah Boroughs was driving to work west on the Schuylkill Expressway between the Vare and University Avenue exits when she saw a billboard showing a frightened middle-aged man perched on a chair with a phone to his ear. And the words: Ehrlich, The 911 of Pest Control. "My first reaction was that I didn't see that right, that no one could be that insensitive," the nurse from Wallingford said, shocked that a business would be exploiting the World Trade Center tragedy. So she looked again the next day. And she still saw exterminators using Sept.
NEWS
April 17, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
Martin Overline, in charge of Penn's pest control, said he has seen as many as three hawks at once flying around the campus. Redtail hawks have adapted well to the urban environment, said Matt Sharp, Academy of Natural Sciences ornithologist. Mice are a big part of their diet, he said.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2015
Where: Bala Cynwyd. Parent: Tokio Marine Group, Japan. Business: Sells insurance in many niches - bowling alleys, cyber security, yoga studios, pest control, zoos, professional liability. What's new: Now covers craft breweries. 2015 revenue: $2.9 billion. Employees: 2,000; 600 here.
NEWS
November 24, 1994 | By Larry Parker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Mount Laurel resident Frank Benedetti wanted to get rid of some pesky squirrels nesting above his bedroom last December, he turned to the Yellow Pages and . . . "let my fingers do the walking. " It took him only a few steps to reach All County Pest Control. Benedetti said he paid the firm's owners, Vincent and Gwen Meloni, $250 to remove the squirrels and received a one-year warranty against their return. But the squirrels, he said, did return. As for All County, its representatives returned once, then not at all. Yesterday, Burlington County Consumer Affairs director Renee Borstad announced that Benedetti was one of nine county residents who had complained to her office about All County, which lists numbers in the Cherry Hill, Cinnaminson, Delran, Marlton and Moorestown phone books.
NEWS
July 29, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Chester County Health Department puts its restaurant inspections online in early January, the reports might offer a fuller appreciation of dining in the county. The Dilworthtown Inn is one of the most highly regarded restaurants in the county. But consider a Nov. 16, 2006 report by the Health Department's Bureau of Environmental Health Protection. In response to a complaint, an inspector found "many dead roach-like insects observed on glue boards in the basement," but none in the kitchen.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 20, 2015
Where: Bala Cynwyd. Parent: Tokio Marine Group, Japan. Business: Sells insurance in many niches - bowling alleys, cyber security, yoga studios, pest control, zoos, professional liability. What's new: Now covers craft breweries. 2015 revenue: $2.9 billion. Employees: 2,000; 600 here.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
IT'S JUNE IN Pennsylvania, and that has come to mean the return of a perennial pest. We're not talking about cicadas or gypsy moths, but financial predators that usually spring to life as Harrisburg scrambles to finalize the state budget by the June 30 deadline. This year, a couple of threats are aiming to expand their tentacles into the state. The first battle is over new regulations for debt-settlement companies, and a Senate bill is likely up for consideration this week. It should be stepped on. Debt-settlement companies are in the realm of predatory lenders - like payday lenders - who promise strapped customers in the midst of financial crisis a way out. But there is no easy way out, and often these promises lead to even more trouble for consumers.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
O SWALDO QUINTERO, 45, of Willow Grove, owns Jig-Saw Exterminating in Feltonville. He got into the business in 2001 and it has been on Rising Sun Avenue near Mascher Street since 2010. Jig-Saw does mostly commercial exterminating. Quintero recently finished the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses 12-week program at Community College of Philadelphia designed to help companies grow. Q: What did you learn during the program? A: I better understand financials. Sometimes we know how to make money, but it's not how much you make but what you do with it after you make it. Q: You've grown your business since the program?
SPORTS
March 4, 2013
Q: Do you have any advice on what I can do to get my aunt off my back? Before she even says hello, all she ever asks me is if I have a boyfriend. I am getting tired of it!! - Fed Up in Feltonville A: I'm sure she means well, but I understand how the constant questioning can get on your nerves. Maybe you should try answering with humor, like "I have one but he's still living on Mars. " Or, "I'm waiting for the right guy but he just hasn't been born yet. " Or you can stop auntie cold by paraphrasing that great line from "Goodfellas": "I got a boyfriend.
FOOD
July 29, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It is an enchanting spread, Blue Elephant Farm, 75 sloping acres, dappled with stone stables, a barn-red barn or two, the occasional sculpted elephant rising in the fields. This is where - on the outskirts of Newtown Square, Delaware County - the urban-farmhouse restaurant called Supper, at 10th and South, procures its "daily [vegetarian] harvest menu. " What Supper's chef Mitch Prensky picks that morning (well, he may skip a day or two), is what you get that night: See those waxy Romanian peppers?
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 90 or so landscapers toiling over the bent grass at Aronimink Golf Club for this week's AT&T National tournament aren't the only ones charged with keeping the course immaculate. Curled up in an office during most of the golfing hours and flitting about dozens of cedar-and-redwood nest boxes scattered around the course are, respectively, a border collie who runs Aronimink's Canada goose patrol, and flocks of bluebirds and swallows whose presence is courted for their insect-eating prowess.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square will work with West 8, a Dutch landscape architecture and urban design firm, to develop a comprehensive master plan to guide the famous public garden's growth over the next 40 years. The plan will address traffic and parking needs, pedestrian flow, facilities for expanded educational and fine arts offerings, maintenance and infrastructure, and ways to "expand the Longwood experience. " That could mean greater emphasis on technology and capitalizing on the garden's little-known assets, such as the 400-acre, working farm that was the original dairy farm of Longwood founder Pierre S. du Pont.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square will work with West 8, a Dutch landscape architecture and urban design firm, to develop a comprehensive master plan to guide the famous public garden's growth over the next 40 years. The plan will address traffic and parking needs, pedestrian flow, facilities for expanded educational and fine arts offerings, maintenance and infrastructure, and ways to "expand the Longwood experience. " That could mean greater emphasis on technology and capitalizing on the garden's little-known assets, such as the 400-acre, working farm that was the original dairy farm of Longwood founder Pierre S. du Pont.
NEWS
December 17, 2008 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry J. Otterson, 77, of Northeast Philadelphia, a former Philadelphia police officer who had a long career in the pest-control business and quite literally invented a better mouse trap, died Dec. 10 at his son's home in Trooper, Montgomery County, from complications of heart disease. For more than 20 years Mr. Otterson owned and operated the White Rose termite- and pest-control company, which served a six-county area in Central Pennsylvania. Mr. Otterson's slogan was, "If the bugs don't go, call Harry O," recalled his former wife, Agnes DeLacy, with whom he ran the business, and with whom he raised three children and six foster children.
NEWS
July 29, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Chester County Health Department puts its restaurant inspections online in early January, the reports might offer a fuller appreciation of dining in the county. The Dilworthtown Inn is one of the most highly regarded restaurants in the county. But consider a Nov. 16, 2006 report by the Health Department's Bureau of Environmental Health Protection. In response to a complaint, an inspector found "many dead roach-like insects observed on glue boards in the basement," but none in the kitchen.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|