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Pete Dexter

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1992 | By Robert G. Seidenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The streets of Philadelphia have perhaps never been as mean as in Pete Dexter's ironically titled Brotherly Love. Far from being the city of brotherly love, in Dexter's book, Philadelphia is the backdrop for family violence of a particularly vicious kind. The book, which has been released in an abridged version by Harper Audio (2 3/4 hours, $16), is unrelentingly dark. It starts with a newspaper report about the deaths of two union officials on the same day, in separate locations in 1986.
NEWS
May 7, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were The Associated Press, Reuters, The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times
Former Philadelphia Daily News columnist Pete Dexter has been chosen to replace Oscar-winning screenwriter Robert Towne (Chinatown) to write the film adaptation of Kim Wozencraft's just-published novel Rush. It seems Towne was taking too long to finish up work on Days of Thunder, the Tom Cruise movie now shooting in Florida. "I couldn't wait any longer," says producer Richard Zanuck, who bought the movie rights to the cops-and- cocaine story for $1 million. Now a columnist for the Sacramento (Calif.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pete Dexter, the Philadelphia Daily News columnist who went to California to work for a newspaper named after a bug, is not exactly basking in the glow of the rave reviews his new novel is getting. He's not the basking type. "I'm glad people like it," he said, and shrugged. Pete Dexter can shrug over the telephone. Paris Trout (Random House, $17.95) is Dexter's third novel, and his most critically acclaimed. The Los Angeles Times called it "a masterpiece, complex and breathtaking.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | By Mike Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 48, Pete Dexter hobbles like a crippled old master, picking his way with a wooden cane. He settles into a soft chair amid a circle of admirers, the cane between his knees, and receives them - famous screenwriters, powerful agents, magazine editors, novelists, ex-English majors who marvel over the Faulknerian moods and references in his work. Which is a joke because Dexter "didn't even understand the f-ing Cliffs Notes to Faulkner. " Still they come - S.I. Newhouse, Jimmy Breslin, Harold Evans - to honor Dexter at a Random House party this week.
NEWS
April 10, 2007 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hanging around with Pete Dexter, you can't help but collect some characters along the way. The troupe assembled along the bar at the red-walled Doc Oliver's Brew & Cue alone is right out of the old Dexter playbook. Were it the old days, and you were making the rounds with Dexter, you might literally collect these people. "We'd have to take him with us," he says more than once, regarding the likely outcome of striking up a conversation with someone like the drooling but bucolic old man at the bar, or the not drooling but staggering man outside the pool hall, or the cackling woman whose boyfriend is picking stuff out of her hair, or the guy with a belly not unlike the one that prompted Dexter to write, back in 1980, when the belly was attached to an old Daily News police reporter named McGuire: "IF THERE IS ANY JUSTICE IN THIS WORLD SOME DAY HIS STOMACH WILL BE MOUNTED OVER THE DOORWAY OF THE GREATEST TAPROOM IN THE COUNTRY.
NEWS
November 4, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a dozen years, Pete Dexter was the scourge of Philadelphia - the most notorious and gripping newspaper columnist the city has ever had. More than a continent separates him from that wild era. He now lives on a bucolic island in Puget Sound. "When I came here there were no stop lights. You could go weeks without hearing a car horn honk or waiting in line for anything," he says from his home on Whidbey Island. "I was here a week when the headline [in the local paper] was: 'Plane Crashes; Three Cows Killed' and they got this picture of dead cows and the plane upside down and the pilot out there scratching his head.
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | BY ARTHUR J. ESTERLING
QUOTABLE If only the world could feel the power of harmony. - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The only way to learn if a person is trustworthy is to trust them. - Ernest Hemingway. All things have to happen at one time or another. - Pete Dexter. If you could kick the person responsible for most of your troubles, you wouldn't be able to sit down for two weeks. - Anonymous. If the world were perfect, it wouldn't be. - Yogi Berra. Living on this planet will kill you. - Truman Capote.
NEWS
January 10, 1992 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
There's something about a movie set in the mid 1970's - as "Rush" is - that's automatically depressing. It's something that goes beyond this movie's downbeat story about addiction and police corruption. I think it's those '70s clothes. Everybody's wearing shirts with gigantic lapels and flared pants. It's no wonder so many people in this picture turn to hard drugs. "Rush," loosely based on a book by former police detective Kim Wozencraft, stars Jennifer Jason Leigh as a young police officer drafted into a nightmarish world of undercover narcotics in a gritty Texas town.
NEWS
May 16, 1986 | BY STEPHEN A. FELDMAN
By now I am quite sure that you have received numerous letters from other lawyers decrying the "outrageous" or "irresponsible" remarks about lawyers made by Pete Dexter. I gather from his column of May 5 that most, if not all, of these letters suggest that Dexter should himself be shot. Perhaps not for expressing his views, but rather for the manner in which he chose to express them. But alas, Dexter is a journalist and the newspaper is his forum. As a lawyer, I recognize that newspapers have a duty to the public to publish views that may be unpopular (although his may not be so)
NEWS
February 17, 1999
So, the time has come to bid my readers farewell. This is my final column after more than 30 years of amusing you and sometimes upsetting you. But I did try not to be mean to anyone or any group (except the Nazis). My fading memory takes me back to the first day I went to the Daily News offices in Philadelphia to talk to Rolfe Neill, then editor of the Daily News. Rolfe had invited me to talk to him about my work as editor of the Catholic Star Herald, official newspaper of the Camden Diocese.
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NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"GOD'S POCKET" is adapted from the book of the same name by former Daily News columnist Pete Dexter, and arrives 30 years after events that inspired the story. Which involved Dexter getting beaten half to death by a group of folks who didn't care for one of his columns - an incident inscribed in newspaper lore, in the legend of Dexter, in the city's own reputation for fight-town toughness. Randall "Tex" Cobb, who accompanied Dexter on that night, and himself sustained a broken arm, later remarked that in Philadelphia "even the drunks punch in combination.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'Not Philip Seymour Hoffman!" read the post from a friend that popped up on Facebook. Found dead on Sunday from an apparent drug overdose in a Greenwich Village apartment, Hoffman was 46. Last month he was front and center at the Sundance Film Festival, premiering a pair of pictures - God's Pocket , based on the Pete Dexter novel, and A Most Wanted Man , an adaptation of the John le Carré spy thriller. Both will be released this year - with the word posthumous certain to show up in the reviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
LOCALLY BORN playwright and screenwriter David Katz found Philip Seymour Hoffman dead in his Manhattan apartment yesterday. The Oscar-winning actor tragically died at age 46 of an apparent overdose. (See Gary Thompson 's appreciation, Page 2.) Katz did not return calls for comment. Reports noted that Katz and a female friend went to check on Hoffman after he failed to pick up his children. Katz's father, Harry Jay Katz , told me Hoffman and his son "were best friends.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer "T
HE PAPERBOY" gives you an idea of what "The Help" might have been like had Lee Daniels directed it. Which is to say that a slice of poop pie would be the least notorious thing in it. Both movies, in broad strokes, are about newspaper rookies in the 1960s South who have a special relationship with the African-American women who raised them. "The Help," however, belongs to the genre of genteel race movies ("Driving Miss Daisy") stocked with politely drawn characters whose sexual feelings, if they have them at all, are deeply buried.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Gil Spencer, a legendary Daily News editor, died on Friday. See his obituary in the front of the paper. IF HE asked, I would have followed Gil Spencer anywhere - over the top at Ypres or into the Daily News sports department. The best editor I ever worked for was also one of the best men I've ever known. When he came to the DN in 1975, I was a young man with a problem with authority who'd blown a chance at a golden corporate future to become an editorial writer doubling as a rock critic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
LOOKS LIKE Ashton Kutcher will be the second XY chromosome in the "Two and a Half Men" equation. "I can't wait to get to work with this ridiculously talented 2.5 team and I believe we can fill the stage with laughter that will echo in viewers' homes," said Kutcher in a statement. "I can't replace Charlie Sheen , but I'm going to work my ass off to entertain the hell out of people!" Added "Two and a Half Men" producer Chuck Lorre : "If I was any happier, it'd be illegal.
NEWS
April 10, 2007 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hanging around with Pete Dexter, you can't help but collect some characters along the way. The troupe assembled along the bar at the red-walled Doc Oliver's Brew & Cue alone is right out of the old Dexter playbook. Were it the old days, and you were making the rounds with Dexter, you might literally collect these people. "We'd have to take him with us," he says more than once, regarding the likely outcome of striking up a conversation with someone like the drooling but bucolic old man at the bar, or the not drooling but staggering man outside the pool hall, or the cackling woman whose boyfriend is picking stuff out of her hair, or the guy with a belly not unlike the one that prompted Dexter to write, back in 1980, when the belly was attached to an old Daily News police reporter named McGuire: "IF THERE IS ANY JUSTICE IN THIS WORLD SOME DAY HIS STOMACH WILL BE MOUNTED OVER THE DOORWAY OF THE GREATEST TAPROOM IN THE COUNTRY.
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carolyn See rarely travels from California to the East Coast, so Bucks County Community College has scored a literary coup in luring the award-winning writer to Newtown for a reading tomorrow. See, author of seven novels and several works of nonfiction, will read from her latest novel, There Will Never Be Another You, as part of the college's celebration of Women's History Month: Reading and Writing Women. See's appearance is co-sponsored by the school's Cultural Programming Committee and the language and literature department.
NEWS
November 4, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a dozen years, Pete Dexter was the scourge of Philadelphia - the most notorious and gripping newspaper columnist the city has ever had. More than a continent separates him from that wild era. He now lives on a bucolic island in Puget Sound. "When I came here there were no stop lights. You could go weeks without hearing a car horn honk or waiting in line for anything," he says from his home on Whidbey Island. "I was here a week when the headline [in the local paper] was: 'Plane Crashes; Three Cows Killed' and they got this picture of dead cows and the plane upside down and the pilot out there scratching his head.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2003 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
None of them will get the Today-Larry King liftoff, not to mention a cool $8 million for its author. None will ride a Stephen King-ly tsunami to international mega-success. But as national media, which usually treat book news as slightly less hot than Sri Lankan peace talks, dismantle the coalition of the willing formed to hype two out of the 120,000 books published this year, forthcoming titles with special interest for Philadelphia and the region lurk within the hundreds of catalogs distributed by publishers last month at BookExpo America in Los Angeles.
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