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Pete Seeger

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NEWS
April 16, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
The song is as mighty as the sword when Pete Seeger brandishes his banjo. Headlining a pair of benefit concerts tonight for councilman Angel Ortiz at the Blushing Zebra coffeehouse, 7167 Germantown Ave. in Mt. Airy, Seeger has spent most of his 68 years as "America's tuning fork" - resonating topical concerns in song and rallying the forces for humanistic reform, be it pro-union or anti-fascist, anti-pollution or pro-peace. Descended from hearty New England colonial stock, Seeger rejected the staid, scholarly musical lifestyle of his parents (ethnomusicologist Charles Seeger and violinist and Julliard teacher Constance de Clyver Edison)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2007
  Directed by Jim Brown. With Pete Seeger, Toshi Seeger, Bruce Springsteen, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, and others. Distributed by the Weinstein Co. 1 hour, 33 mins. PG (adult themes). Playing at Ritz at the Bourse. Long before there was Bono, there was Pete Seeger. A singer and songwriter whose pursuit of peace, social justice, and environmental causes brought him into contact with Martin Luther King, Paul Robeson, Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan and Bill Clinton - and into trouble with the House Un-American Affairs Committee - Seeger has had a life like a great novel.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many Americans of my generation, I first met Pete Seeger through his music. I learned "This Old Man" in kindergarten. As a teenager, "If Had a Hammer" played on my transistor radio. And as the Vietnam War and civil-rights movement convulsed the nation, I marched in protest to the verses of "We Shall Overcome" and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" Then I got to know him in a more personal way. On Oct. 15, 1971, I set foot for the first time on Clearwater, the 106-foot traditional wooden sailboat he had helped to conceive and build, and which became a part of his lasting legacy.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By William W. Sutton Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Folk singer Pete Seeger came to the Blushing Zebra coffee house in Mount Airy last night to sing for Councilman Angel L. Ortiz and endorse his re- election effort. "He's outgoing, he's frank, he's witty," said Seeger of Ortiz before his campaign-benefit performance. "A lot of politicians are always whispering, saying, 'I can't say this out loud, but I'm going to do this, or I'm going to do that.' Ortiz, I believe, is going to speak out loud, whether people like it or not. " Seeger met Ortiz in Nicaragua in January when the councilman accompanied U.S. Rep. Thomas M. Foglietta and several other congressmen and journalists to the Central American nation where contra rebels, with support from President Reagan, are challenging government rule of the Sandinistas.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
A digital single and music video of the classic Bob Dylan song "Forever Young" is being released Monday by folksinger/activist Pete Seeger to mark the 50th anniversary of Dylan's eponymous first album. Seeger, who is 92, is a mentor of Dylan and his song is being pushed through a grassroots campaign www.ForeverPete.com . The effort is modeled on the successful 2010 fan-based endeavor to get then-88-year-old Betty White to host Saturday Night Live.   Weekend box office Audiences headed back to school for the update of 21 Jump Street, which opened at No. 1 this weekend at $35 million.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Pete Seeger, 94, the folksinger and social-justice advocate who popularized "We Shall Overcome" as an anthem of the civil-rights movement, wrote "Turn! Turn! Turn!", and had a career spanning more than seven decades, has died. Kitama Cahill-Jackson, the singer's grandson, told the Associated Press that Mr. Seeger died in his sleep about 9:30 p.m. Monday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he had been for six days. President Obama praised the man Carl Sandburg once called "America's tuning fork": "Over the years, Pete used his voice - and his hammer - to strike blows for workers' rights and civil rights; world peace and environmental conservation.
NEWS
March 9, 1994 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Katarina Witt performed her figure-skating program at the Winter Olympics to "Where Have All the Flowers Gone," one Delaware County resident cheered especially long and hard. Peter Blood was moved and inspired by the message embodied in Witt's performance, a remembrance of the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo and a plea for peace in the former Yugoslavia. "She couldn't have chosen a better song," he said in an interview this week. "The song is about people who have failed to learn from the legacy of hatred and killing through the generations.
LIVING
June 21, 1998 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Off the phone at last, Pete Seeger springs from a back bedroom and calls out a greeting. "Who's that guy with the gray hair?" he wants to know. I laugh; it's been 17 years since last we saw each other. I point out the white in his beard and what's left of his hair, and he laughs, too. "Hey, is it warm enough in here?" he wonders, glancing around the kitchen of his converted barn in Beacon, N.Y. I start to say it's fine, but he doesn't wait for an answer. "Think I'll put another log on," he says, and disappears.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1994 | By Ann Kolson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside the small offices here, on East Third Street in what was once a coin shop, there are stacks of tapes and CDs, shelves of albums, mountains of publications, file cabinets crammed with correspondence, newsletters and old photos. On the walls there are fading pictures of young Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger on stage. But this is no dusty museum. It's the headquarters of Sing Out! magazine, a thriving enterprise dedicated to folk music, kept alive by a band of hard-core folkies.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | By Amy Linn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adhesive tape held his glasses together. He wore a sailor's cap, a faded blue flowered cotton shirt rolled up to his elbows, brown corduroy pants, thick-soled hiking boots - a hearing aid. Thin wisps of gray hair nudged his shirt collar, and his lanky frame towered over most who stood near him. In many ways, Pete Seeger was as constant as the North Star. His appearance has never changed. Neither has his shyness. On a January night at the Bala Theater this year, Seeger was stuck in his least favorite position - singled out for special attention - but there wasn't much he could do about it. The Bala Cynwyd concert was partly in his honor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
'How could a show about Woody Guthrie go wrong at a theater called 'the People's Light?' " Performer and show cocreator David M. Lutken posed that question in his slow drawl as part of the preshow warm-up for Woody Sez: The Life and Music of Woody Guthrie . Now imagine that sentence again. Hear it as coming from a man smart enough to want to keep you guessing about his intelligence. Slow down the cadence of words to a near halt at the word "wrong. " Leave the listener (that's you)
NEWS
February 2, 2014
Schooling generations in song As a college student in 1959, I had the honor of meeting and singing along with Pete Seeger at Oberlin College. We all joined him in a hootenanny after his concert performance, singing into the wee hours ("A giant of music and activism," Jan. 29). Through the years, when I taught vocal music to elementary school children in the Philadelphia public schools, I included many songs that Seeger wrote or cowrote. I explained the songs' historical context, and how songs can be used to speak out for peace and justice, or in protest.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
A story Wednesday on a reporter's experiences with the folksinger Pete Seeger, who died Monday, misstated the town where Seeger lived, Beacon, N.Y. A story Thursday on Philadelphia city ethics policies wrongly reported on the Board of Ethics and the wording of the City Code. Ethics Board officials said in December that the code's wording made it impossible to ban cash gifts to city employees and officers, but changed their view this month after the city's lawyers informally advised them that the code allows such a ban, said Shane Creamer, the board's executive director.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Pete Seeger, 94, the folksinger and social-justice advocate who popularized "We Shall Overcome" as an anthem of the civil-rights movement, wrote "Turn! Turn! Turn!", and had a career spanning more than seven decades, has died. Kitama Cahill-Jackson, the singer's grandson, told the Associated Press that Mr. Seeger died in his sleep about 9:30 p.m. Monday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, where he had been for six days. President Obama praised the man Carl Sandburg once called "America's tuning fork": "Over the years, Pete used his voice - and his hammer - to strike blows for workers' rights and civil rights; world peace and environmental conservation.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many Americans of my generation, I first met Pete Seeger through his music. I learned "This Old Man" in kindergarten. As a teenager, "If Had a Hammer" played on my transistor radio. And as the Vietnam War and civil-rights movement convulsed the nation, I marched in protest to the verses of "We Shall Overcome" and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" Then I got to know him in a more personal way. On Oct. 15, 1971, I set foot for the first time on Clearwater, the 106-foot traditional wooden sailboat he had helped to conceive and build, and which became a part of his lasting legacy.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Toshi Seeger, 91, folk singer Pete Seeger's wife of 70 years and a close partner in his social and environmental activism, has died. Longtime family friend Thom Wolke confirmed that she died Tuesday night at the couple's home in Beacon in New York's Hudson Valley, about 65 miles north of New York City. The cause of death was not immediately known. Friends say Mrs. Seeger was an equal who perfectly complemented the idealism of her husband, 94. "To understand Pete, you have to know Toshi," Wolke said.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
A digital single and music video of the classic Bob Dylan song "Forever Young" is being released Monday by folksinger/activist Pete Seeger to mark the 50th anniversary of Dylan's eponymous first album. Seeger, who is 92, is a mentor of Dylan and his song is being pushed through a grassroots campaign www.ForeverPete.com . The effort is modeled on the successful 2010 fan-based endeavor to get then-88-year-old Betty White to host Saturday Night Live.   Weekend box office Audiences headed back to school for the update of 21 Jump Street, which opened at No. 1 this weekend at $35 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2011 | By Chris Talbott, Associated Press
Tao Rodriguez-Seeger was halfway through Friday night's march down Broadway to support the Occupy Wall Street movement, a guitar strapped over his shoulder and his grandfather Pete Seeger at his side. Suddenly a New York City police officer stepped from the crowd and grabbed his elbow. "Are you Tao Seeger?" the officer asked tersely. "Was this your idea? Did you think of this?" Rodriguez-Seeger was certain arrest was imminent. The officer reached for his hand and he readied for the cuffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
OPRAH WINFREY meditated with more than 400 women in Fairfield, Iowa, last week. "You've got a corn!" "You've got a corn!" "You've got a corn!" Transcendental Meditator Suzanne Stryker blabbed that no one in the meditation group at the Maharishi School, in Fairfield, knew that Oprah was going to be there until she arrived with a film crew. It's all part of the plan to change OWN to "OM. " The private Maharishi School specializes in "consciousness-based education" for kindergarten through 12th grade.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2011
JUST ONE nighttime concert, plus two days of song swaps and a banjo contest constituted the first Philadelphia Folk Festival, held Sept. 8-9, 1962, on the C. Colket Wilson estate in Paoli. On the bill: Tossi Aaron, the Greenbrier Boys, Reverend Gary Davis, Paul Cadwell, Bonnie Dobson, Ramblin' Jack Elliot, Mike Seeger & Sonny Miller, Professor Clearence Johnson & Mabel Washington, and headliner Pete Seeger. Noted folklorist Ken Goldstein also led a workshop. Old-timey country musician Obray Ramsey canceled 'cause his crop was coming in. Bill Keith, returning to the festival this weekend, won the banjo contest.
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