FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
January 29, 2012
For lovers of (little) pets, the Cuddle 'n Carry Shirt may be barking up just the right tree. The cotton-polyester-blend sweatshirt has a pouch sewn into the inside front of the zippered chest section that lets you keep your animal companion close to your heart - literally. A small dog, cat, ferret, or any creature under 10 pounds that is amenable can snuggle inside with head free to look around at the passing scene. The Cuddle 'n Carry is machine washable and dryable and comes in black, blue, or camel.
LIVING
September 29, 2000 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Michelle, 11, wants to be adopted by a family who will spend time with her. Just taking a walk and talking, one-on-one, is a great pleasure to this child, and being an older sister to a brother or sister would also bring her joy. She'd like two parents or a single mother, and it would be a plus if they had pets to cuddle. There is neglect and abuse in Michelle's background. She is receiving therapy that helps her to deal with feelings of loss, and is working on her behavior and issues around adoption.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Most dogs, and some cats, like to eat fruits and vegetables. In moderation, these vitamin-filled foods can make an excellent addition to a pet's rations. My old cat, Maggie, was addicted to cantaloupe. He (despite its name, the cat was very much a male) would steal it from the table when my back was turned. And I've known dogs that ate tomatoes from the vine. Samoyed fancier Judy Mears gives her dogs whole oranges. She says they first play with the oranges like balls, then gobble the tooth-marked remains.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Joan Fairman Kanes
The Main Line Emergency Center cares for animals when many veterinary practices are closed. It opened Oct. 1 at the Ardmore Animal Hospital.
NEWS
October 27, 2007 | By MARY ELIZABETH BATTLES Special to the Daily News
It's important to keep your pets safe every day, but especially so around Halloween. I grew up loving this magical day - full moons, pumpkins, ghosts, goblins and the best part: all that trick-or-treat candy. However, as I got older I found out some of the terrible things that happened to animals around this otherwise fun time of year. Without going into sad details, let me just say: Don't let your cats out, especially if they are black, until several weeks after Halloween. This could save their lives.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Don't worry, master. Just give me a sack and have a pair of boots made so that I can go into the brambles, and you will see that you are not so badly off after all. - "The Master Cat" by Charles Perrault Robert Mitchell lay awake in bed, wracking his brain for an idea. And then he saw D.C. D.C. is the 2-year-old calico Mitchell and his wife, Marlena, found on the campus of Delaware College while visiting their daughter. An unexpected addition to the Mitchells' Yeadon household, the cat had charmed her human companions.
NEWS
March 8, 2008
I'M VERY UPSET ABOUT the recent huge meat recall. I saw video of sick cattle being "shoveled" off on forklifts to be slaughtered. Reminiscent of the Holocaust. As an animal lover, I don't believe we should be breeding animals for our food. But if we must breed animals for food, then we should breed them for their products that won't kill them - like milk to make cheese, yogurt, etc. We should breed chickens for their eggs only. All should have names and be treated as pets.
NEWS
November 10, 2007 | By MARY ELIZABETH BATTLES Special to the Daily News
A few years ago the Humane Society of the U.S. had a TV commercial that told the whole story. Two men were sitting at a kitchen table with a roaring fire in the background. One guy says "Where is that cute puppy you had last year?" The other guy says "He's older so he stays outside now. " The camera shows a dog outside with its nose pressed up against the window, longingly looking to come inside. The announcer says, "Animals need warmth and comfort too. " OK, you know where this is going.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer Staff wrtiter Julie Knipe Brown contributed to this story
A 70-year-old man died early yesterday trying to save his cat and dog from his burning rowhouse in the heart of Port Richmond. Joseph Shields, who lived on Edgemont Street near Allegheny Avenue, initially escaped the 3:30 a.m. fire with his wife, Gladys, 50, and his 20-year-old son, Joseph, authorities said. But the elder Shields couldn't bear the thought of his pooch and kitty trapped inside, so he returned to the house to rescue them. As thick smoke filled the place, Shields climbed to a second floor bedroom to find his beloved pets, but was overcome by smoke.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Fleas and other external parasites are a plague all year long, but they are particularly bothersome and health-threatening in summer. The prevalence of Lyme disease, carried by deer ticks, makes it even more important that preventive and eradicative measures be employed. Much as one would like to avoid the use of chemical compounds on or around pets, the average dog or cat owner is likely to resort to them as the simplest approach to the problem. However, don't just buy chemical flea- and tick- repellent products in a supermarket or drugstore.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I have two dogs, both older golden retrievers, whom I love. Here is the problem. My husband keeps moving our dogs' food and water bowls out into the garage, and because we store the food in the kitchen, I move the bowls back. He thinks the bowls are ugly and in the way. I agree, but I'm the one who feeds them, and I get sick of carting the food into the garage or the bowls into the kitchen to fill. I get that this is a silly thing to argue about. - P.D. A: Oh, I wish you'd sent in a picture of your dogs.
NEWS
July 12, 2016
IN CHESTNUT HILL on Sunday, a "Petapalooza" featured events galore for people and their pets, including arts and crafts and live music. Rescue and adoption organizations were on hand to give petless people and peopleless pets a chance to find one another and make a home. The party was put on by the Chestnut Hill Business District and the Weavers Way Co-op in partnership.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
In the animal care world, July 5 is known as the busiest day of the year. The reason? Fireworks. At the sound of the first boom, family pets will tear through screens, break windows, shoot out doors, scale tall fences and race for miles until they are completely disoriented and exhausted. "That one day can be pretty scary," said Laura Garber, manager of behavior and enrichment for the Pennsylvania SPCA. It's not just the larger firework displays but also the occasional neighborhood firework or sidewalk popper that can send pets running, said Garber.
NEWS
June 28, 2016
THE Daily News Pet of the Week is Cyrus, a 3-year-old American Staffordshire terrier mix at the Pennsylvania SPCA. Cyrus was brought to the PSPCA in mid-April as part of a cruelty case. He is a love bug, a handsome hunk who seems always to be smiling. He's happy to greet people but does have some fear of strangers. For more information about Cyrus, call the PSPCA at 215-426-6300, stop by the shelter at 350 E. Erie Ave., North Philadelphia, or visit pspca.org.  
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
Still looking for a Father's Day gift? The Animal Care & Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) is waiving all adoption fees this weekend. The "Who's Your Daddy?" promotion for all pets will run this weekend from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 111 W. Hunting Park Ave, in North Philadelphia. "Summer is an extremely busy time of year for us," Vincent Medley, ACCT Philly executive director, said in a statement. "This event makes it fun and stress-free to come find a new best friend. " The regular screening procedures that include "meet and greets" with children and and other pets in the prospective household will apply, according to the shelter.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2016 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
At Emily Sabalbaro's December nuptials at the Loews Hotel, two adorable ring bearers took part in the procession: Her 9-year-old nephew - and her 80-pound Great Pyrenees/border collie in a bow tie. Although Dempsey rejected the tux with tails Sabalbaro bought him, everything else went as planned. Their dog walker brought Dempsey to the ceremony, and Sabalbaro's brother-in-law took the dog down the aisle on a sleek black leather leash. "It was really important to us because we got Dempsey together as a couple and that was a big step for us," Sabalbaro said.
NEWS
May 29, 2016
* "PET-TERNITY LEAVE"? It's a thing in the U.K., according to research by pet insurance provider Petplan, which found that nearly 1 in 20 new pet owners is employed by a company that offers paid leave when people acquire a new pet. The time off ranges from 10 hours to several weeks and can be used for training classes, vet visits or helping the pet get settled. Companies include pet food manufacturer Mars Petcare and IT company BitSol Solutions. * One of the world's oldest dogs died last month.
NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: My wife and I have fought over whether I should be giving her open access to my personal email. I've had this account at least twice as long as I've known her (going back 20ish years), and we had a kind of cat-and-mouse situation where she would try to trick me into giving it to her. She finally forced me to tell her one time by refusing to get out of the way when we needed to check on an email in my account. She assured me she would not force me to do so again. Not long after, she did it again, and we fought over it. She thought she was being playful, but I know she was only acting playful about it because this is one sticking point she has always had about our relationship.
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
*  A vet clinic that cares for pets of people who are homeless has a full-time home. The Mercer Veterinary Clinic for the Pets of the Homeless in Sacramento, Calif., had its grand opening last month as the Tom Kendall Teaching Clinic. Started in 1992, it operated in various temporary locations for 24 years, providing pets with exams, treatments, vaccinations, parasite preventives and spay or neuter surgery, all at no cost, supported only by donations. The clinic's current goal is to purchase more surgical equipment to become fully functional.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
STONE HARBOR, N.J. - On a gray, unseasonably chilly day last week, two turtle hatchlings emerged from their winter hibernation inside a hole three inches beneath the sand at the Jersey Shore. The diamondback terrapins, a unique turtle that lives in brackish waters along the coast and Delaware Bay, would soon taste freedom for the first time. But first, a biologist with the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor would have to remove the wire cages that had been placed above their nests last fall to protect the hatchlings - each the size of a quarter - from raccoons, skunks, and other predators.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|