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TRAVEL
January 29, 2012
For lovers of (little) pets, the Cuddle 'n Carry Shirt may be barking up just the right tree. The cotton-polyester-blend sweatshirt has a pouch sewn into the inside front of the zippered chest section that lets you keep your animal companion close to your heart - literally. A small dog, cat, ferret, or any creature under 10 pounds that is amenable can snuggle inside with head free to look around at the passing scene. The Cuddle 'n Carry is machine washable and dryable and comes in black, blue, or camel.
LIVING
September 29, 2000 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Michelle, 11, wants to be adopted by a family who will spend time with her. Just taking a walk and talking, one-on-one, is a great pleasure to this child, and being an older sister to a brother or sister would also bring her joy. She'd like two parents or a single mother, and it would be a plus if they had pets to cuddle. There is neglect and abuse in Michelle's background. She is receiving therapy that helps her to deal with feelings of loss, and is working on her behavior and issues around adoption.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Most dogs, and some cats, like to eat fruits and vegetables. In moderation, these vitamin-filled foods can make an excellent addition to a pet's rations. My old cat, Maggie, was addicted to cantaloupe. He (despite its name, the cat was very much a male) would steal it from the table when my back was turned. And I've known dogs that ate tomatoes from the vine. Samoyed fancier Judy Mears gives her dogs whole oranges. She says they first play with the oranges like balls, then gobble the tooth-marked remains.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Joan Fairman Kanes
The Main Line Emergency Center cares for animals when many veterinary practices are closed. It opened Oct. 1 at the Ardmore Animal Hospital.
NEWS
October 27, 2007 | By MARY ELIZABETH BATTLES Special to the Daily News
It's important to keep your pets safe every day, but especially so around Halloween. I grew up loving this magical day - full moons, pumpkins, ghosts, goblins and the best part: all that trick-or-treat candy. However, as I got older I found out some of the terrible things that happened to animals around this otherwise fun time of year. Without going into sad details, let me just say: Don't let your cats out, especially if they are black, until several weeks after Halloween. This could save their lives.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Don't worry, master. Just give me a sack and have a pair of boots made so that I can go into the brambles, and you will see that you are not so badly off after all. - "The Master Cat" by Charles Perrault Robert Mitchell lay awake in bed, wracking his brain for an idea. And then he saw D.C. D.C. is the 2-year-old calico Mitchell and his wife, Marlena, found on the campus of Delaware College while visiting their daughter. An unexpected addition to the Mitchells' Yeadon household, the cat had charmed her human companions.
NEWS
March 8, 2008
I'M VERY UPSET ABOUT the recent huge meat recall. I saw video of sick cattle being "shoveled" off on forklifts to be slaughtered. Reminiscent of the Holocaust. As an animal lover, I don't believe we should be breeding animals for our food. But if we must breed animals for food, then we should breed them for their products that won't kill them - like milk to make cheese, yogurt, etc. We should breed chickens for their eggs only. All should have names and be treated as pets.
NEWS
November 10, 2007 | By MARY ELIZABETH BATTLES Special to the Daily News
A few years ago the Humane Society of the U.S. had a TV commercial that told the whole story. Two men were sitting at a kitchen table with a roaring fire in the background. One guy says "Where is that cute puppy you had last year?" The other guy says "He's older so he stays outside now. " The camera shows a dog outside with its nose pressed up against the window, longingly looking to come inside. The announcer says, "Animals need warmth and comfort too. " OK, you know where this is going.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | by Joe O'Dowd, Daily News Staff Writer Staff wrtiter Julie Knipe Brown contributed to this story
A 70-year-old man died early yesterday trying to save his cat and dog from his burning rowhouse in the heart of Port Richmond. Joseph Shields, who lived on Edgemont Street near Allegheny Avenue, initially escaped the 3:30 a.m. fire with his wife, Gladys, 50, and his 20-year-old son, Joseph, authorities said. But the elder Shields couldn't bear the thought of his pooch and kitty trapped inside, so he returned to the house to rescue them. As thick smoke filled the place, Shields climbed to a second floor bedroom to find his beloved pets, but was overcome by smoke.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Fleas and other external parasites are a plague all year long, but they are particularly bothersome and health-threatening in summer. The prevalence of Lyme disease, carried by deer ticks, makes it even more important that preventive and eradicative measures be employed. Much as one would like to avoid the use of chemical compounds on or around pets, the average dog or cat owner is likely to resort to them as the simplest approach to the problem. However, don't just buy chemical flea- and tick- repellent products in a supermarket or drugstore.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 21, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
William B. Fretz Jr. and John P. Freeman thought they had hit a low point in 2009, when one of their biggest clients - and one of the state's premier power brokers - was convicted of corruption. As former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo headed to prison, their Montgomery County hedge fund, Covenant Partners, sagged under the weight of the recession and federal investigations. But the two were never charged, and Covenant carried on with the type of high-risk, high-reward investments that had made them millions.
NEWS
April 1, 2015
IN HIS OFFICE, on the mantle, Joe Lombardo has an urn with the remains of his beloved Samoyed, Butkus, named after the intimidating Chicago Bears linebacker. Butkus died in 2008. The dog, that is. The thing is, Lombardo can't be sure that's actually Butkus in the urn. After receiving Butkus' ashes, Lombardo questioned the cremation company. "They tell you, 'We're telling you,' " Lombardo tells me. "That's all well and good, but wonder if this is really . . . " he says, his voice trailing off. His suspicions motivated him to research online, which I duplicated.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to dogs and cats, Camden has long had some of the strictest ordinances in the state, including one requiring all owners to spay or neuter their pets. In fact, until recently, Camden was the only municipality in New Jersey with such a mandate. This month, after city officials became aware the ordinance was more restrictive than state law, City Council voted to amend it. Now, the city no longer tickets pet owners who don't fix their dogs as long as those dogs are licensed.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Deathly ill, Harley was marinating in his own toxins. The 4-year-old cat's kidneys had stopped performing their vital blood-cleansing function. The orange tabby from Jordan - his owner was a diplomat in Washington - was carried into the dialysis suite limp, eyes half-closed and glazed over. The veterinarians and other staff at the University of Pennsylvania were already masked and gloved. They hooked Harley up. Penn's Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital is one of a dozen dialysis centers nationally (four are on the East Coast)
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
Liz Hendley has $17 left after paying all of her bills each month. That's barely enough for a week's worth of groceries for herself, much less for her two dogs, Shadow and Chichi. "If it wasn't for Marianne, I couldn't keep up with them," the 79-year-old Warminster woman said. Marianne Iaquinto is the founder of Sam's Hope, a nonprofit that donates pet food, treats, toys, anything a pet would need, to low-income people in Philadelphia and Bucks and Montgomery Counties. In the last 19 months, Sam's Hope, named in memory of a dog Iaquinto used to have, has distributed more than 67,000 pounds of pet food through a combination of home deliveries and partnerships with food pantries and nonprofits that assist seniors.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
One man's ceiling is another man's floor. And one man's entrée is another man's pet. Today I'm talking about one of my chickens, who just died. And, yes, I had it cremated. Rather than barbecued. I can't decide if this makes absolute sense. Or is completely crazy. You be the judge. To give you some background, I keep a flock of about 15 hens, of different varieties. There are white Wyandottes, a shiny black Australorp, a few Rhode Island Reds and brown Ameraucanas, which lay greenish-blue eggs.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't let the dogs out. At least not without proper attire. Friday marked the coldest day in Philadelphia in 21 years - the high was only 17 degrees - and it's not going to get much better over the weekend. That makes the Animal Care and Control Team's offer of free straw bedding this weekend to city residents not only appealing, but possibly essential. Although some believe that an animal's fur is sufficient in freezing weather, it's still important to provide properly insulated shelter for dogs, cats and other animals, said ACCT spokeswoman Ame Dorminy.
NEWS
February 3, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last summer, Posh was just another stray cat, living out his days at Quakertown's "Last Chance Ranch. " Now, the chunky feline with deep green eyes has a home in a Delaware Valley College dorm. Posh playfully crawled last week across an organic chemistry notebook left open on the dorm-room desk. "No one's real favorite, except for, I guess, his," observed Russell Desmond, a West Chester sophomore and aspiring veterinarian who with his roommate, Nate Borger, shares custody of the cat. A couple of doors down, Sarah Boughton clutched Isla, a white rabbit that loves to hop around the room but that never scales the baby gate barring the doorway.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN AN early-December fire consumed their kitchen and filled their North Philadelphia house with smoke, Sharon McCurdy and her adult son, Wilson Washington, fled onto 27th Street near Somerset. Their beloved gray-and-white cat, Tigger, was missing. Once the fire scene was secure, former firefighter Jennifer Leary and her Red Paw Emergency Relief Team responded to Tigger's absence as intensely as the Red Cross responds to families displaced by disaster. Leary found Tigger at the scene of the fire, boarded him in her house, took him to a veterinarian and placed him in Red Paw's network of temporary foster homes until he could return to his. After staying with relatives, McCurdy and Washington were able to move back home just before Christmas.
NEWS
December 23, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the midst of last month's unwelcome arctic blast, animal-control officer Danny Rivera responded to South Philadelphia, where a dog had been left outside with no protection from temperatures that were expected to drop into the 20s. Another officer from the nonprofit Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia had visited the home on Titan Street three days earlier. Rivera was returning to make sure the dog was indoors. A woman led Rivera down into the basement to show that her tan-and-white pit bull was sheltered against the elements and appeared healthy.
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