CollectionsPetting Zoo
IN THE NEWS

Petting Zoo

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A decision on Bette Tweedie's plan to open a petting zoo with such animals as pigs, llamas and donkeys on land behind her home was once again delayed last night. The plan before the Winslow Township Zoning Board has been under fire from Tweedie's neighbors in the Treecroft development, who claim the introduction of a petting zoo in their neighborhood would attract hordes of people, trash, traffic and vermin. The Zoning Board last night decided to wait another month, until its Sept.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2007, Kahn the camel made a planned appearance at the opening of the King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute and was well-received, his owner recalled. Then-Gov. Ed Rendell also was in attendance at the black-tie event. Last Friday, Kahn showed up at a fraternity party at the University of Pennsylvania. This time, however, his appearance generated criticism, as did the inclusion of a petting zoo for the Spring Fling. Charis Matey, co-owner of the Peaceable Kingdom petting zoo in Bucks County, said the five-year-old camel was content and not abused at the Zeta Psi party, and was supervised by her staff and several nondrinking students.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Llamas and donkeys and ducks. Oh my! This may be what many of Bette Tweedie's patrons will say when she finally hangs her "open for business" sign on the entrance of her new petting zoo. Tweedie's seven-month attempt to open the business behind her New Brooklyn-Blue Anchor Road home ended early yesterday when the township Zoning Board unanimously approved the variance that has been under fire from Tweedie's neighbors in the 59-home Treecroft...
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | For The Inquirer / LINDA JOHNSON
Anna Heaney of Feasterville pauses at the window before continuing to make a colonial-style dinner at Bolton Mansion. The Fairless Hills estate hosted a summer festival Saturday featuring pony rides, petting zoo, games, and food from its working colonial kitchen.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | Photographs for The Inquirer by Elizabeth Vorhauer
More than 90 booths and a full list of activities attracted visitors to the 17th annual Mantua Fun Day. Held last weekend at the municipal complex on Main Street, the festivities included food booths, a petting zoo, a karate demonstration, face painting and a baby-crawling race.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / CARL A. BREITINGER
If it's the last Wednesday in August, it's gotta be fun. Fun Wednesday that is, a jolly day for residents of the Camden County Health Services Complex. Staff members host games, and residents are treated to a petting zoo filled with warm fuzzies and to live music from the local band, The Sentimental Gentlemen.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / J. MICHAEL McDYRE
The Springton Manor Farm and Museum is a one-stop agrarian history lesson. The complex has a modern working farm to show how crops are grown, a petting zoo for children, a nature trail and an antique farm museum, filled with implements from old-time farms. The farm is open seven days a week; there is a small charge for the farm tour.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 2007, Kahn the camel made a planned appearance at the opening of the King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute and was well-received, his owner recalled. Then-Gov. Ed Rendell also was in attendance at the black-tie event. Last Friday, Kahn showed up at a fraternity party at the University of Pennsylvania. This time, however, his appearance generated criticism, as did the inclusion of a petting zoo for the Spring Fling party. Charis Matey, co-owner of the Peaceable Kingdom petting zoo in Bucks County, said the 5-year-old camel was content and not abused at the Zeta Psi party and was supervised by her staff and several nondrinking students.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE - It started out as a simple petting zoo, with some barnyard animals, a few spider monkeys, and one aging lion. But in 37 years, the Cape May County Zoo has evolved from a one-trick-pony kind of place to a ranking on Trip Advisor as the No. 3 zoo in the nation for visitor satisfaction. It also has one of the most highly accredited breeding programs in the country for such species as American bison and snow leopards. "It truly has grown to become one of the jewels in our county," said Diane F. Wieland, director of the Cape May County Department of Tourism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2013 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
The best part of the Philadelphia Zoo's new KidZooU exhibit, at least in the eyes of my two nieces, was the barnyard. As the two stood in the exhibit, they were surrounded by colorful (goat) kids, all nuzzling them in an attempt to reach the brushes the girls held. A short distance away, they marveled over the sheep wandering in their pen. An extremely loud donkey - which made the girls think of Shrek - let it be known that he needed some attention. Lest this sound like a typical children's petting zoo, realize this: KidZooU is all that you expect - and then a little more.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
THURSDAY they treated me like an animal. OK - I'm an animal every day, and you are, too, so don't be giggling behind your hairless paw. You may think you're something special, but to biologists you are an animal, a mammal to be precise. Yes, yes, you have a really big brain, but most of it you don't use. Yes, yes, you have an opposable thumb, a high order of communication and the ability to theorize, but, really, you're just an animal. Thinking about animals leads to the zoo, and this is a big weekend for the Philadelphia Zoo, America's first.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2007, Kahn the camel made a planned appearance at the opening of the King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute and was well-received, his owner recalled. Then-Gov. Ed Rendell also was in attendance at the black-tie event. Last Friday, Kahn showed up at a fraternity party at the University of Pennsylvania. This time, however, his appearance generated criticism, as did the inclusion of a petting zoo for the Spring Fling. Charis Matey, co-owner of the Peaceable Kingdom petting zoo in Bucks County, said the five-year-old camel was content and not abused at the Zeta Psi party, and was supervised by her staff and several nondrinking students.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 2007, Kahn the camel made a planned appearance at the opening of the King Tut exhibit at the Franklin Institute and was well-received, his owner recalled. Then-Gov. Ed Rendell also was in attendance at the black-tie event. Last Friday, Kahn showed up at a fraternity party at the University of Pennsylvania. This time, however, his appearance generated criticism, as did the inclusion of a petting zoo for the Spring Fling party. Charis Matey, co-owner of the Peaceable Kingdom petting zoo in Bucks County, said the 5-year-old camel was content and not abused at the Zeta Psi party and was supervised by her staff and several nondrinking students.
NEWS
July 4, 2010 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester Park was filled with people craving the usual stuff of an Independence Day weekend festival, and there was plenty of food, vendors, games, and entertainment at Saturday's festivities to satisfy everyone. But the biggest craving this year was for something different - a reprieve from the violence that lately has engulfed the city's streets. Chester is holding its July Fourth weekend activities despite the state of emergency that Mayor Wendell N. Butler Jr. imposed last month - and that the City Council extended - after a series of shootings and homicides.
NEWS
September 24, 2006 | Inquirer staff
What it is: Hatboro will host its first Fall Fun Festival, a six-day affair beginning tomorrow. Carnival rides and games, a laser-light show, nightly entertainment, local cuisine, a petting zoo, and a search for the "Hatboro Idol" will be among the highlights. The opening ceremonies, emceed by local comedian Grover Silcox, will begin at 6 tomorrow night with a parade from the Loller Building, 414 S. York Rd. The Upper Moreland High School marching unit and the Horsham Police Honor Guard will lead the parade.
NEWS
January 23, 2002 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A father-to-daughter kidney transplant was successful yesterday for a Montgomery County girl who suffered devastating effects from an E. coli infection contracted in October 2000 from animals at a local farm. Erin Jacobs, 4, of Jeffersonville, was recovering from the surgery last night at Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington after doctors removed a kidney from her father, Rick, and implanted it in her. The transplant operation went well, and both were in stable condition last night, according to hospital spokeswoman Karen Bengston.
NEWS
December 14, 2001 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 4-year-old girl whose kidney failure was attributed to E. coli contracted at a suburban petting zoo is recovering from surgery last week to remove both kidneys, her father said yesterday. Erin Jacobs of Jeffersonville, Montgomery County, who was 3 when she was sickened after visiting Merrymead Farm in Worcester last fall, will receive a kidney from her father, Rick Jacobs, on Jan. 22. Erin had surgery Friday at Alfred I. du Pont Institute and returned home Monday, Jacobs said yesterday.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Following an outbreak of E. coli bacteria that sickened dozens of visitors to a petting zoo in Montgomery County last fall, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday issued guidelines for preventing the spread of diseases from farm animals to humans. The guidelines emphasize the importance of hand washing with running water, and of ensuring that food is not prepared or eaten near animals that can be touched. Also, children under 5 should be closely supervised around farm animals.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|