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Pew Charitable Trusts

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NEWS
May 15, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The official name is a jawbreaker, so just call it the Tiny Grant Fund. For 10 years, the Northwest Interfaith Movement has been doling out dollars from the Pew Charitable Trusts in small doses. When the next - and final - round of grants is announced in a few weeks, it'll amount to $1.7 million sliced 2,072 ways. The money has bought freezers for soup kitchens and pantries. It's underwritten racial dialogues, provided supplies for vacation Bible schools and after school tutorials, bought computers and even basketball jackets.
NEWS
August 9, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas W. Langfitt, 78, who during his tenure as president of the Pew Charitable Trusts transformed a little-known Philadelphia-based philanthropy into one of the nation's largest foundations, died of miliary tuberculosis Sunday at home in Wynnewood. Dr. Langfitt - as a board member from 1979 and as chief executive officer from 1987 to 1994 - oversaw Pew's conversion from a family-run enterprise to the nation's fifth-largest foundation, one that championed such causes as childhood development, health care and the environment.
NEWS
October 3, 1998 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet F. Haas, a specialist in rehabilitative medicine and brain trauma who is the daughter-in-law of philanthropist F. Otto Haas, has been named president of the William Penn Foundation, the region's second-largest philanthropy. Her cousin, David Haas, son of John C. Haas, will become chair of the foundation. In a prepared statement, David Haas said the appointment of his cousin to William Penn's top administrative post represented "a natural evolution. " "The William Penn Foundation is well positioned to build for the future," he said.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rendell and Gov. Ridge put aside their political differences yesterday for a good cause - helping draw more free-spending tourists to the Philadelphia region. In a joint news conference, Rendell, Ridge and Pew Charitable Trusts president Rebecca Rimel detailed how the city, the state and the foundation would spend $12 million over the next three years to advertise the region to tourists. This is 16 times what the city now spends annually to promote tourism. Compared with what other cities spend on consumer advertising to lure visitors, Philadelphia has been a piker, ranking 20th nationally in 1994 among metropolitan areas, according to a consultants' study commissioned by Pew. Las Vegas in 1994 spent $7.2 million, Los Angeles $1.4 million and Miami $1.3 million on consumer advertising, while Philadelphia spent $251,000, according to the study, conducted by Parter International Inc., of New York.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting about 3 p.m. each day, thousands of Philadelphia children wander out of school with nothing to do. Home? It's empty till Mom gets home at 6 p.m. The park? Creepy guys hang around it. School? It's closed. The library? It's only open Mondays and Thursdays. So, how about church? In many of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods, churches are often the most stable, values-rich, community-based institutions around. For that reason the Pew Charitable Trusts wants to see many of this city's latchkey children heading toward a church in the afternoons.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Philadelphia cultural organizations wistfully remember the old days when they could just drop into the offices of the Pew Charitable Trusts. "You used to be able to go to Pew and talk and they'd ask you where your big problems were and what they could do," said Stephen Goff, managing director of the Annenberg Center at the University of Pennsylvania. "Now there are consultants and directives and guidelines. I guess I miss the dialogue. " Mayor Rendell relishes the here and now with Pew, a time when foundation officials ring him up and toss out ideas about packaging the city and delivering it to visitors.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with big-city peers, the Philadelphia School District spends less per pupil than almost any other education system in the country - even Detroit's. Philadelphia's per-pupil price tag last school year was $12,570 - the lowest of any comparable district except Memphis, Tenn.; Tampa, Fla.; and Dallas, the Pew Charitable Trusts concluded in a report released Thursday. Detroit spent $13,419 per student, and Boston, at the top of the peer-district list, spent $18,626. Pennsylvania is one of just three states that lack an education funding formula, and city schools have paid the price in recent years, with many unable to fund full-time guidance counselors or after-school activities.
NEWS
February 5, 2015
An informational box Wednesday wrongly described the Pew Charitable Trusts' role in "The Next Mayor," a project designed to support high-quality reporting on the Philadelphia mayoral race. The Pew's Philadelphia Research Initiative is participating but is not a partner.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Less than two months after resolving a three-year contract agreement, the Philadelphia Orchestra has received two major grants. First came a $500,000 grant from the Presser Foundation, earmarked for education and community outreach programs. These initiatives will be phased in over the next five years, exploring music director Christoph Eschenbach's intention of "raising the invisible curtain" between musicians and the audience. A $10 million matching grant was also announced Tuesday from the Neubauer Family Foundation.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Pew Charitable Trusts said Tuesday it will give $8.59 million over the next three years to 45 Philadelphia-area groups that help the region's low-income children, youth, and their families. The Center City foundation it expected the grants annually to assist more than 22,000 local young people. The poverty rate for children in the city is 37 percent, Pew said. The grants from the Pew Fund for Health and Human Services is geared to these areas: early education and child care; prevention and early intervention services to reduce behavioral and academic problems; mental health services; quality after-school programs; and helping parents secure and retain public benefits and services to strengthen household stability.
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NEWS
April 3, 2016
Larry Eichel and Katie Martinare are with the Pew Charitable Trusts' Philadelphia research initiative, which studies key issues facing Philadelphia. Philadelphia in 2016 is a growing city undergoing a sweeping transformation, most evident in the age and diversity of those who live here. The city's population has risen for nine consecutive years, up a further 5,880 in the most recent count. The increase since 2006 stands at 78,732, a stark reversal after a decrease of nearly 600,000 over the previous five decades.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Pew Charitable Trusts said Tuesday it will give $8.59 million over the next three years to 45 Philadelphia-area groups that help the region's low-income children, youth, and their families. The Center City foundation it expected the grants annually to assist more than 22,000 local young people. The poverty rate for children in the city is 37 percent, Pew said. The grants from the Pew Fund for Health and Human Services is geared to these areas: early education and child care; prevention and early intervention services to reduce behavioral and academic problems; mental health services; quality after-school programs; and helping parents secure and retain public benefits and services to strengthen household stability.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania is one of 22 states that has not adopted "best practice" quality standards for compounding sterile drugs, a study has found. New Jersey has adopted some of the standards "but not in their entirety," according to Pew Charitable Trusts, which performed the study, commissioned after a deadly 2012 outbreak traced to a Massachusetts compounding facility. After tainted steroid injections from the New England Compounding Center caused a fungal meningitis outbreak that killed 64 people and sickened more than 750, state and federal officials reexamined laws and regulations governing drug compounding - the traditional pharmacy practice of creating custom medicines to meet individual needs of a patient.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Jack Tomczuk, Staff Writer
State lawmakers want to hold hearings on the physical condition of Pennsylvania's schools, State Sen. Vincent J. Hughes announced Friday at Locke Elementary, which lost heat last week, sending students home for the day. The legislator also asked the state Education Department to audit the Philadelphia School District. Hughes' announcement was, in part, a response to a boiler explosion this month at Edmonds Elementary School in East Mount Airy, which left a maintenance employee critically injured.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Local control of large urban school systems is no magic bullet to improve academic performance, research released Thursday indicates. Then again, neither is state control of such districts. The conclusions from the Pew Charitable Trusts come amid a growing local push for an end to the School Reform Commission, which has controlled the beleaguered Philadelphia School District since 2001. Opponents of the SRC - created during the state's takeover of the district, amid financial crisis and academic distress - say it has outlived its usefulness and ought to be replaced by some sort of locally appointed or locally elected board.
NEWS
December 15, 2015
P ATRICK CALLIHAN, 49, of Landenberg, Chester County, is executive director of Tech Impact, a North Philly-based nonprofit that helps nonprofit clients make sense of large-scale technology projects and provides tech maintenance and support services. The firm also helps young, at-risk urban adults move into IT careers. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: The company started in 2003 as NPower Pennsylvania, a nonprofit formed to help other nonprofits with tech. In 2012, NPower broke up and we rebranded as Tech Impact.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2015
Marian Baldini has been hired as president and CEO of KenCrest, a nonprofit Plymouth Meeting provider of human and social services for people across the age spectrum who have, or are at risk of having, intellectual disabilities and autism. She had been chief operating officer of Jewish Employment and Vocational Services of Philadelphia. Amy J. Goldberg has been appointed professor and chair of the department of surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University , surgeon-in-chief for Temple University Health System , and medical director of perioperative services at Temple University Hospital.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A report released Wednesday by the Pew Charitable Trusts reveals a stark divide in perceptions about Philadelphia, with the affluent feeling most optimistic about the city's future and the poor viewing it as a place whose best days have ended. The findings are not new or surprising, given that the city's increasingly wealthy downtown has remained surrounded by hundreds of thousands of impoverished people in neighborhoods farther away. But they illustrate that the optimism over redevelopment in central Philadelphia is little felt beyond the construction cranes in the city's core.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
MOST Philadelphians are either down on the city, or skeptical of its chances for future success. That's my reading of a novel city survey assessing attitudes rather than demographics, from the always engaging Pew Charitable Trusts. Rather than lump Philadelphians into the familiar categories of age, income, race, gender, religion or political party, it harnessed computer power to create four attitudinal groups: Dissatisfied Citizens, Die-hard Loyalists, Uncommitted Skeptics, Enthusiastic Urbanists.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | BY MARTHA WOODALL, Inquirer staff writer martha.woodall@phillynews.com, 215-854-2789
THE JOHN S. AND JAMES L. Knight Foundation wants to change the conversation about Philadelphia public schools to keep talented millennials from leaving the city once they have school-age children. The Miami-based philanthropy is scheduled to announce today that it has awarded $250,000 to the Fund for the School District of Philadelphia to promote what is working in district schools and highlight student achievement. "It's a one-year grant, and it's really designed to help us do things that nonprofits often don't get the money to do," said Donna Frisby-Greenwood, president and chief executive of the fund, created in 2003 to secure and manage financial gifts to the district.
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