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Pew Charitable Trusts

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NEWS
May 15, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The official name is a jawbreaker, so just call it the Tiny Grant Fund. For 10 years, the Northwest Interfaith Movement has been doling out dollars from the Pew Charitable Trusts in small doses. When the next - and final - round of grants is announced in a few weeks, it'll amount to $1.7 million sliced 2,072 ways. The money has bought freezers for soup kitchens and pantries. It's underwritten racial dialogues, provided supplies for vacation Bible schools and after school tutorials, bought computers and even basketball jackets.
NEWS
August 9, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas W. Langfitt, 78, who during his tenure as president of the Pew Charitable Trusts transformed a little-known Philadelphia-based philanthropy into one of the nation's largest foundations, died of miliary tuberculosis Sunday at home in Wynnewood. Dr. Langfitt - as a board member from 1979 and as chief executive officer from 1987 to 1994 - oversaw Pew's conversion from a family-run enterprise to the nation's fifth-largest foundation, one that championed such causes as childhood development, health care and the environment.
NEWS
October 3, 1998 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet F. Haas, a specialist in rehabilitative medicine and brain trauma who is the daughter-in-law of philanthropist F. Otto Haas, has been named president of the William Penn Foundation, the region's second-largest philanthropy. Her cousin, David Haas, son of John C. Haas, will become chair of the foundation. In a prepared statement, David Haas said the appointment of his cousin to William Penn's top administrative post represented "a natural evolution. " "The William Penn Foundation is well positioned to build for the future," he said.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rendell and Gov. Ridge put aside their political differences yesterday for a good cause - helping draw more free-spending tourists to the Philadelphia region. In a joint news conference, Rendell, Ridge and Pew Charitable Trusts president Rebecca Rimel detailed how the city, the state and the foundation would spend $12 million over the next three years to advertise the region to tourists. This is 16 times what the city now spends annually to promote tourism. Compared with what other cities spend on consumer advertising to lure visitors, Philadelphia has been a piker, ranking 20th nationally in 1994 among metropolitan areas, according to a consultants' study commissioned by Pew. Las Vegas in 1994 spent $7.2 million, Los Angeles $1.4 million and Miami $1.3 million on consumer advertising, while Philadelphia spent $251,000, according to the study, conducted by Parter International Inc., of New York.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting about 3 p.m. each day, thousands of Philadelphia children wander out of school with nothing to do. Home? It's empty till Mom gets home at 6 p.m. The park? Creepy guys hang around it. School? It's closed. The library? It's only open Mondays and Thursdays. So, how about church? In many of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods, churches are often the most stable, values-rich, community-based institutions around. For that reason the Pew Charitable Trusts wants to see many of this city's latchkey children heading toward a church in the afternoons.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Philadelphia cultural organizations wistfully remember the old days when they could just drop into the offices of the Pew Charitable Trusts. "You used to be able to go to Pew and talk and they'd ask you where your big problems were and what they could do," said Stephen Goff, managing director of the Annenberg Center at the University of Pennsylvania. "Now there are consultants and directives and guidelines. I guess I miss the dialogue. " Mayor Rendell relishes the here and now with Pew, a time when foundation officials ring him up and toss out ideas about packaging the city and delivering it to visitors.
NEWS
February 5, 2015
An informational box Wednesday wrongly described the Pew Charitable Trusts' role in "The Next Mayor," a project designed to support high-quality reporting on the Philadelphia mayoral race. The Pew's Philadelphia Research Initiative is participating but is not a partner.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with big-city peers, the Philadelphia School District spends less per pupil than almost any other education system in the country - even Detroit's. Philadelphia's per-pupil price tag last school year was $12,570 - the lowest of any comparable district except Memphis, Tenn.; Tampa, Fla.; and Dallas, the Pew Charitable Trusts concluded in a report released Thursday. Detroit spent $13,419 per student, and Boston, at the top of the peer-district list, spent $18,626. Pennsylvania is one of just three states that lack an education funding formula, and city schools have paid the price in recent years, with many unable to fund full-time guidance counselors or after-school activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2005 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
Less than two months after resolving a three-year contract agreement, the Philadelphia Orchestra has received two major grants. First came a $500,000 grant from the Presser Foundation, earmarked for education and community outreach programs. These initiatives will be phased in over the next five years, exploring music director Christoph Eschenbach's intention of "raising the invisible curtain" between musicians and the audience. A $10 million matching grant was also announced Tuesday from the Neubauer Family Foundation.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
From the Betsy Ross house on Arch Street to author Pearl Buck's house way out in rural Erwinna, the Philadelphia area boasts the largest conglomeration of historic house museums in America. No one is sure exactly how many nonprofit house museums there are in the region - 150 is an educated guess. One thing that is known is that they can all use more money. Yesterday, the Pew Charitable Trusts announced a $2.6 million grant program to help fix leaking roofs, peeling plaster and cracked walls at some of the museums.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts has signed on a new resident company. The Curtis Institute of Music joined the roster effective Wednesday, making it the Kimmel's first new resident company since its opening in December 2001. As far as the listening public is concerned, little will change with the start of the five-year contract. Curtis ensembles have performed at the Kimmel from the start - its orchestra in Verizon Hall and operas in the Perelman Theater. But as a resident company, Curtis will receive breaks on rental fees and priority scheduling, and will be featured in Kimmel marketing and advertising.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Feeling optimistic? You've got company. More than two-thirds of Philadelphians recently surveyed said they expect the city to improve over the next five years, while fewer than one in five see worse times ahead. More young people say they plan to stay. In fact, the historically cantankerous denizens of the nation's fifth-most-populous city now report feeling more positive than at any time in the last six years, according to a poll by the Pew Charitable Trusts, which has asked the same question about residents' outlook since 2009.
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nameplates were hurriedly shuffled when Marjorie Neff took her place as chairwoman of the School Reform Commission at Thursday night's monthly meeting. The audience showered Neff with applause as she sat beside Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. She then thanked former Chairman Bill Green, seated two seats to her right, for his service. Hite addressed news, first reported by Inquirer columnist Mike Newall, that the district allowed thousands of books to pile up in a dusty, block-long basement beneath its headquarters.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Education is the most important issue to Philadelphians - more important than crime, jobs, and the economy, according to a new study by the Pew Charitable Trusts. City residents favor eliminating the School Reform Commission, want an elected school board, and "have an extremely low opinion of the performance of the public school system," according to a research study released Monday. Philadelphians were mixed on charter schools in the poll - they view them generally positively, but most back the idea of spending more money on traditional public schools rather than creating new charter schools.
NEWS
February 5, 2015
An informational box Wednesday wrongly described the Pew Charitable Trusts' role in "The Next Mayor," a project designed to support high-quality reporting on the Philadelphia mayoral race. The Pew's Philadelphia Research Initiative is participating but is not a partner.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with big-city peers, the Philadelphia School District spends less per pupil than almost any other education system in the country - even Detroit's. Philadelphia's per-pupil price tag last school year was $12,570 - the lowest of any comparable district except Memphis, Tenn.; Tampa, Fla.; and Dallas, the Pew Charitable Trusts concluded in a report released Thursday. Detroit spent $13,419 per student, and Boston, at the top of the peer-district list, spent $18,626. Pennsylvania is one of just three states that lack an education funding formula, and city schools have paid the price in recent years, with many unable to fund full-time guidance counselors or after-school activities.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A NEW REPORT on K-12 education funding finds that Philadelphia lags behind many big-city school districts in per-pupil funding. The report, commissioned by Pew Charitable Trusts, analyzes funding of 10 large school districts across the country in states with a comprehensive funding formula that takes into account need, demographics and poverty. (Pennsylvania is one of three states that does not have such a formula.) It concludes that in 2012-13, the Philadelphia School District spent roughly $12,570 per pupil - less than the average of Boston, Milwaukee, Cleveland, New York, Baltimore, Chicago and Detroit.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Even when she goes to the movies, Susan Weinstock was saying, she can't get away from a topic that has possessed her work for much of the last four years: Many banks' shamelessly opportunistic overdraft fees. Weinstock, director of the Pew Charitable Trusts' consumer banking project, had just seen Bill Murray portray a grizzled war veteran in St. Vincent - his usual charming misanthrope. Between scenes of Murray's misdeeds, he's the victim of one himself: He can't shut a bank account because he owes $112 in overdraft fees.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gregory Rowe, 63, of Berwyn, an arts and culture visionary, whose business and fund-raising strategies helped push Philadelphia's cultural progress, died at his home Friday, Oct. 3, after a 14-month battle with cancer. Mr. Rowe's knowledge of financial management led to one of the most successful periods in the history of People's Light & Theatre Company in Malvern, where he worked as managing director from 1983-1997. During that time, the theater's operating budget tripled, capital assets quadrupled, and it developed one of the country's largest arts-education programs - all while remaining free of operating debt.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new studies add to a mountain of evidence that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has done a poor job of making sure medical devices are safe. The studies, in the current issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, are accompanied by commentaries that point out that the agency recognizes the need for change and is in the midst of improving the device approval system. But critics say the FDA has an inherent conflict because of its dual role of protecting public health and encouraging medical innovation.
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