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Pew Charitable Trusts

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NEWS
May 15, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The official name is a jawbreaker, so just call it the Tiny Grant Fund. For 10 years, the Northwest Interfaith Movement has been doling out dollars from the Pew Charitable Trusts in small doses. When the next - and final - round of grants is announced in a few weeks, it'll amount to $1.7 million sliced 2,072 ways. The money has bought freezers for soup kitchens and pantries. It's underwritten racial dialogues, provided supplies for vacation Bible schools and after school tutorials, bought computers and even basketball jackets.
NEWS
August 9, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas W. Langfitt, 78, who during his tenure as president of the Pew Charitable Trusts transformed a little-known Philadelphia-based philanthropy into one of the nation's largest foundations, died of miliary tuberculosis Sunday at home in Wynnewood. Dr. Langfitt - as a board member from 1979 and as chief executive officer from 1987 to 1994 - oversaw Pew's conversion from a family-run enterprise to the nation's fifth-largest foundation, one that championed such causes as childhood development, health care and the environment.
NEWS
October 3, 1998 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet F. Haas, a specialist in rehabilitative medicine and brain trauma who is the daughter-in-law of philanthropist F. Otto Haas, has been named president of the William Penn Foundation, the region's second-largest philanthropy. Her cousin, David Haas, son of John C. Haas, will become chair of the foundation. In a prepared statement, David Haas said the appointment of his cousin to William Penn's top administrative post represented "a natural evolution. " "The William Penn Foundation is well positioned to build for the future," he said.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1996 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rendell and Gov. Ridge put aside their political differences yesterday for a good cause - helping draw more free-spending tourists to the Philadelphia region. In a joint news conference, Rendell, Ridge and Pew Charitable Trusts president Rebecca Rimel detailed how the city, the state and the foundation would spend $12 million over the next three years to advertise the region to tourists. This is 16 times what the city now spends annually to promote tourism. Compared with what other cities spend on consumer advertising to lure visitors, Philadelphia has been a piker, ranking 20th nationally in 1994 among metropolitan areas, according to a consultants' study commissioned by Pew. Las Vegas in 1994 spent $7.2 million, Los Angeles $1.4 million and Miami $1.3 million on consumer advertising, while Philadelphia spent $251,000, according to the study, conducted by Parter International Inc., of New York.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting about 3 p.m. each day, thousands of Philadelphia children wander out of school with nothing to do. Home? It's empty till Mom gets home at 6 p.m. The park? Creepy guys hang around it. School? It's closed. The library? It's only open Mondays and Thursdays. So, how about church? In many of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods, churches are often the most stable, values-rich, community-based institutions around. For that reason the Pew Charitable Trusts wants to see many of this city's latchkey children heading toward a church in the afternoons.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Philadelphia cultural organizations wistfully remember the old days when they could just drop into the offices of the Pew Charitable Trusts. "You used to be able to go to Pew and talk and they'd ask you where your big problems were and what they could do," said Stephen Goff, managing director of the Annenberg Center at the University of Pennsylvania. "Now there are consultants and directives and guidelines. I guess I miss the dialogue. " Mayor Rendell relishes the here and now with Pew, a time when foundation officials ring him up and toss out ideas about packaging the city and delivering it to visitors.
NEWS
February 5, 2015
An informational box Wednesday wrongly described the Pew Charitable Trusts' role in "The Next Mayor," a project designed to support high-quality reporting on the Philadelphia mayoral race. The Pew's Philadelphia Research Initiative is participating but is not a partner.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with big-city peers, the Philadelphia School District spends less per pupil than almost any other education system in the country - even Detroit's. Philadelphia's per-pupil price tag last school year was $12,570 - the lowest of any comparable district except Memphis, Tenn.; Tampa, Fla.; and Dallas, the Pew Charitable Trusts concluded in a report released Thursday. Detroit spent $13,419 per student, and Boston, at the top of the peer-district list, spent $18,626. Pennsylvania is one of just three states that lack an education funding formula, and city schools have paid the price in recent years, with many unable to fund full-time guidance counselors or after-school activities.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
Health club memberships, political contributions, and $3,000 line-dancing lessons are among the expenses that a well-connected Philadelphia lobbyist is accused of illegally charging to a state grant program meant to help welfare recipients land steady jobs. Now, Melonease Shaw - who has at times worked as the city's lobbyist in Harrisburg, and who was, until her arrest, seeking the job again - faces a court hearing next week on charges including theft, deceptive business practices, and tampering with public records.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The long-standing custom of giving Philadelphia City Council members complete control over land use in their districts, known as councilmanic prerogative, took a beating in federal court Wednesday when a jury said it was used by a Council member to punish a political foe. Developer Ori Feibush had accused Councilman Kenyatta Johnson of blocking his attempts to buy two city-owned lots after he announced plans to run against Johnson in the 2015 Democratic...
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NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Among the nation's largest cities, Philadelphia offers the most business tax breaks, forgoing more than $200 million a year in revenue as a result, a study by the Pew Charitable Trusts found. The report, released Thursday, looked at business tax incentives and exemptions between 2001 to 2003 and 2010 to 2012, the most recent complete set of tax data. It determined that between 2010 and 2012, the city forgave an average of $110 million annually in business incentives and $106 million in industry tax exemptions.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2016 | Mike Zebe, Staff
Anthony J. Conti has become the chair of the board of managers of the Philadelphia Foundation. A board member since 2011, Conti has chaired the nominating and governance committee and is currently leading the board's strategic planning committee. He retired as a partner at PWC, Philadelphia. Conti succeeds Lawrence J. Beaser , a partner at Blank Rome L.L.P. SolomonEdwards' managing partner Brian Markley has been named to the board of Business Leadership Organized for Catholic Schools.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
Health club memberships, political contributions, and $3,000 line-dancing lessons are among the expenses that a well-connected Philadelphia lobbyist is accused of illegally charging to a state grant program meant to help welfare recipients land steady jobs. Now, Melonease Shaw - who has at times worked as the city's lobbyist in Harrisburg, and who was, until her arrest, seeking the job again - faces a court hearing next week on charges including theft, deceptive business practices, and tampering with public records.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, STAFF WRITER
A new study by the Pew Charitable Trusts suggests that the gentrification of Philadelphia neighborhoods may be far less common than assumed. Only 15 of the city's 372 residential census tracts - 4 percent - gentrified between 2000 and 2014, the analysis found. Ten times as many tracts experienced significant drops in median income, as the number of residents living in poverty grew by more than 60,000. "I was a little surprised to see how few of the neighborhoods qualified as gentrified," said Larry Eichel, director of Pew's Philadelphia research initiative.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The long-standing custom of giving Philadelphia City Council members complete control over land use in their districts, known as councilmanic prerogative, took a beating in federal court Wednesday when a jury said it was used by a Council member to punish a political foe. Developer Ori Feibush had accused Councilman Kenyatta Johnson of blocking his attempts to buy two city-owned lots after he announced plans to run against Johnson in the 2015 Democratic...
BUSINESS
May 3, 2016 | Mike Zebe, Staff
Aqua America Inc., Bryn Mawr, has hired Susan F. Haindl as chief administrative officer. She had been a vice president at Anexinet, a provider of digital business solutions, and prior to that was managing director, operations, for the Pew Charitable Trusts. Univest Insurance, a subsidiary of Univest Bank & Trust Co., Souderton, has named Dennis Boyle senior vice president and employee-benefits practice leader. He had been vice president of sales for the eastern region at employee-benefits firm Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. Bryn Mawr Bank Corp., parent of Bryn Mawr Trust Co., has named Noel Collins, Brian K. Snyder, and Roderick A. Ward as vice presidents and relationship managers.
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
Six months before Durga Dulal arrived in Philadelphia as a refugee from Bhutan, fire swept through the U.N. camp in the Himalayas where she, her husband, and their four children lived, consuming all they owned. Five years later, the memory still makes the otherwise sunny woman's eyes well. Her family, she said, was traumatized - though it fared better than three camp neighbors who, despondent over their losses, committed suicide. Dulal, 46, was unburdening herself to a social worker at the Philadelphia Refugee Mental Health Collaborative, an innovative program that since 2011 has helped refugees not only heal from past ordeals, but also overcome the culture shock of life in America.
NEWS
April 3, 2016
Larry Eichel and Katie Martinare are with the Pew Charitable Trusts' Philadelphia research initiative, which studies key issues facing Philadelphia. Philadelphia in 2016 is a growing city undergoing a sweeping transformation, most evident in the age and diversity of those who live here. The city's population has risen for nine consecutive years, up a further 5,880 in the most recent count. The increase since 2006 stands at 78,732, a stark reversal after a decrease of nearly 600,000 over the previous five decades.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Pew Charitable Trusts said Tuesday it will give $8.59 million over the next three years to 45 Philadelphia-area groups that help the region's low-income children, youth, and their families. The Center City foundation it expected the grants annually to assist more than 22,000 local young people. The poverty rate for children in the city is 37 percent, Pew said. The grants from the Pew Fund for Health and Human Services is geared to these areas: early education and child care; prevention and early intervention services to reduce behavioral and academic problems; mental health services; quality after-school programs; and helping parents secure and retain public benefits and services to strengthen household stability.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania is one of 22 states that has not adopted "best practice" quality standards for compounding sterile drugs, a study has found. New Jersey has adopted some of the standards "but not in their entirety," according to Pew Charitable Trusts, which performed the study, commissioned after a deadly 2012 outbreak traced to a Massachusetts compounding facility. After tainted steroid injections from the New England Compounding Center caused a fungal meningitis outbreak that killed 64 people and sickened more than 750, state and federal officials reexamined laws and regulations governing drug compounding - the traditional pharmacy practice of creating custom medicines to meet individual needs of a patient.
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